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1993 ANNUAL 




STONY FORK 
MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



NORTH CAROLINA 



MINUTES 
of the 
STONY EXDRK MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATICN 
NORTH CAROLINA 
1992 

ONE HUNDEIED TeiRTY-SBCJOND ANNUAL SESSION 
Held with 
Long Ridge/ August 6, 1993 

and with 
Mt. Ephraim, August 7, 1993 



Bie one hundred and thirty-third session will be held with Rock ^^ing on 
August 12, 1994 and Sandy Flat on August 13/ 1994. 



TABLE OF COHTENTS 



Suggested Order of Business 2 

Associational Leaders 3 

Constitution 4 

Proceedings 12 

Foreign Missions 15 

Vacation Bible School 16 

Sunday School/WMU 17 

Finance Report 18 

Home Missions 19 

Home Mission Board 20 

State Missions 21 

Children's Homes 23 

Retirement Homes 24 

Baptist Hospital 25 

Christian Higher Education 27 

Baptist Foundation 28 

Proceedings 29 

Associational Workers 31 

Biblical Recorder 32 

Discipleship Training 33 

Cooperative Program 34 

Christian Action League 35 

Stewardship 37 

Obituaries/Resolutions 38 

Budget 39 

Tables 40 



SDGGESTED ORDER OP BUSINESS FOR 1994 
ONE HUtQIRED AND THIRTY THIRD 
ANNUAL MEETING OF STONY FOR 
MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

FRIDAY MORNING/ AUGUST 12, 1994 
ROCK SPRING 



8:30 Call to Order Moderator 

8:35 Song Song Leader 

8:40 Devotion Pastor of Host Church 

8:50 Adoption of Program Moderator 

9:00 Roll Call Clerk 

9:05 Recognition of New Pastors & Workers Moderator 

9:10 Vacation Bible School Barbara West 

9:15 Foreign Missions John McCoury 

9:25 Sunday School Bonnie Walsh 

9:30 Cooperative Program Pauline Berry 

9:40 Evangelism George Berry 

9:50 Finance Report - Budget Edith Gryder 

10:00 Break 

10:10 Home Missions Vera Dula 

10:25 State Missions Charles Smith 

10:40 Childrens Homes Jeri Triplett 

10:55 Retirement Homes Mamie Craig 

11:10 Baptist Hospital Edwana Smith 

11:25 Christian Higher Education Debbie Walsh 

11:40 Baptist Foundation Dale Luttrell 

11:53 Stewardship Speaker 

12:10 Annual Message Speaker 

1 : 00 Ad j oum-L unch 

SATURDAY MORNING/ AUGUST 13/ 1994 
SANDY FLAT 

8:30 Call to Order Moderator 

8:35 Song Song Leader 

8:40 Devotion Pastor of Host Church 

8:50 Roll Call... Clerk 

8:55 Biblical Recorder Allison Smith 

9:05 Discipleship Training , Charles Craig 

9:15 W.M.U Eunice Luttrell 

9:25 Temperance & Morals-CAL Sharon Craig 

9:50 General Board Report George Berry 

9:55 Stewardship Report Roy Gryder 

10:00 Break 

10:10 Resolutions Betty Woods 

10:15 Obituaries Clerk 

10:20 Business 

Election of Officers 

Approve Budget 

11:00 Annual Message Speaker 

12:00 Adjourn-Lunc 



ASSOCIATIONAL LEADERS 



DIRECTCe OF MISSIONS: George Berry, Rt. 1/ Box 318, Sugar Grove, N.C. 28679 

Phone: 704-297-1223 

MODERATOR: Max West, Rt. 1, Box 539, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 

Phone: 704-264-2427 

VICE MODERATOR: Ron Burgette, 2304 Maywood St., Lenoir, N.C. 28645 

Phone: 704-726-0816 

CLERK: Linda Mills, Rt. 1, Box 596, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 

Phone: 704-295-7095 

TREASURER: Edith Gryder, Rt. 2, Box 182, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 

Phone: 704-295-3410 

SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTOR: Bonnie Walsh, Rt. 5, Box 315, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 

Phone: 704-754-5696 

DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING: Charles Craig, Rt. 3, Box 730, Boone, N.C. 28607 

Phone: 704-963-4120 

MUSIC MINISTRY DIRECTOR: Pauline Eldreth, 434 Grand Blvd., Boone, N.C. 28607 

Phone: 704-264-2532 

WMU DIRECTOR: Eunice Luttrell, Rt. 1, Box 650, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 

Phone: 704-295-7732 

EVANGELISM DIRECTOR: George Berry, Rt. 1, Box 318, Sugar Grove, N.C. 28679 

Phone: 704-297-1223 

STEWARDSHIP DIRECTOR: Roy Gryder, Rt. 2, Box 182, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 

Phone: 704-295-3410 

NOMINATING COMM. CHM: Max West, Rt. 1, Box 539, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 

Phone: 704-264-2427 



Next Annual Meeting: August 12, 1994 - Rock Spring Baptist Church 

August 13, 1994 - Sandy Flat Baptist church 



OONbTlTUTlGN 



OF THE STONY FORK MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PREAMBLE 

For the declaration of its fundamental purposes and the permainent guidance 
and control of its activities/ the txx3y does adopt the following as its constitution/ 
to wit: 

ARTICLE I - Name and Membership 

Section 1. This body shall be known as the Stony Fork Missionary Baptist 
Association of North Carolina. 

Section 2. The Association is composed of Missionary Baptist Churches. 

Section 3. Any Baptist Church may be admitted into this Association upon 
recommendation of the Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitution of 
the Churches Committee and the majority vote of members present at any meeting 
as prescribed in Article IX. 

Section 4. Any Church at her discretion/ may withdraw from this body. 

Section 5. This association may, at any meeting/ after an investigation 
and report of a duly authorized committee of the Association/ by an majority 
vote/ declare a dissolution of union with any church deemed corrupt/ either 
in doctrine or practice. 

Section 6. Each church shall elect its messengers to the Annual Associational 
meeting. Each messenger must be certified in the annual church letter to the 
Association and must be appointed on the following ratio: Five messengers/ 
in addition to the pastor/ for each church having a membership not exceeding 
fifty/ and one additional messenger for each increase of fifty. In no case 
shall the total number of messengers exceed ten for any given church/ in addition 
to the pastor. 

Section 7. When any church shall fail to be represented by letter or 
messenger for two consecutive years / the Missions Committee shall confer with 
the church/ and if satisfactory reason is not given/ and there is no evidence 
that said church wishes to keep alive their affiliation with the Association/ 
the committee shall bring its findings to the next Executive Committee Meeting/ 
the Association shall/ at that time/ by a majority of present members/ vote 
to withdraw fellowship. The Association recognizes the right of any affiliated 
church to withdraw its fellowship from the Association. 

Section 8. The Annual Associational meeting shall convene on Friday at 
8:30 a.m. and adjourn at 1:00 p.m. (lunch to follow). It shall reconvene 
at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday and adjourn at the completion of business for the 
noon meal. This following the first Sunday in August. 

ARTICLE II - Purpose 

Section 1. The prime purpose of the Association shall be to counsel together 
for the enlargement and strengthening of God's kingdan and to promote unity 
and growth among the churches corrposing it. 

Section 2. It shall be the purpose of this Association to enlist all 
of the churches into full cooperation with the North Carolina Baptist State 
Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention and their agencies in the work 
of missions/ evangelism/ christian education and social service. 

ARTICLE III - Powers and Perogatives 
Section 1. The association/ when covened in meeting/ shall sit as an 
advisory council and shall have no power to infringe on any of the internal 



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rights and affairs of the mentser churches. It may advise/ however/ with the 
member churches and recommend measures of usefulness for their adoption or 
rejection. 

Section 2. When grievamces occur between any members or minority group 
of any church which is a member of the Association/ the Association/ the Executive 
Committtee/ or Missins Committee/ or the conmittee designated by and acting 
for either of these bodies/ may advise or give aid in matters which do not 
infringe on the rights of the local church/ and this only on the invitation 
of the individual or group involved. 

Section 3. Any church found unfaithful to the faith and practices common 
to the Association/ as outlined in Addendum I - ARTICLES OF FAITH (The Baptist 
Faith and Message as adopted by the Southern Baptist Convention in 1963) shall 
be encouraged to correct such errors. If the conduct of said church is not 
corrected and is of such nature as to alienate said church from the orderly 
and faithful churches of the Association/ the Executive Committee of the Associaticxi 
can recommend that fellowship be withdrawn from said church/ and upon a majority 
vote of the messengers in an Annual session/ fellowship with such church can 
be withdrawn. (See Article 1/ Section 7). 

ARTICLE IV - The Executive Committee 

Section 1. The Association shall have cin Executive Committee to serve 
as the Association between Annual Meetings/ assisting in the overall work of 
the Association with such limitations as may be inposed by the constitution. 

Section 2. The Executive Committee shall be composed of the associational 
officers aind the Pastors / and the Chairman of Deacons / along with two elected 
lay persons from each church. Sixteen members shall constitute a quorum. 
The names of these persons shall be furnished annually to the associational 
clerk/ if changes occur during the associational year, these changes shall 
be forwarded to the Clerk. 

Section 3. At the beginning of each Executive Committee Meeting/ a roll 
call will be taken of each church and its representatives. 

Section 4. The Executive Committee shall meet within two weeks after 
the Annual Associational Meeting/ the second Sunday of November/ March/ and 
July. These meetings shall be held in churches of the Association/ consecutively/ 
in alphabetical order. 

ARTICLE V - Officers 

Section 1. The officers of this body shall be: Moderator/ Vice-Moderator/ 
Clerk/ Treasurer/ Sunday School Director/ Church Training Director/ Brotherhood 
Director/ W.M.U. Director/ Vacation Bible School Director/ Music Director/ 
Pianist/ Evangelism Director and Youth Coordinator. 

Section 2. The officers of the Association shall be elected at each regular 
Annual Associational Meeting. The Nominating committee shall fill vacancies 
that may occur in their respective categories between annual meetings of the 
Association by bringing names to the Executive Committee for their approval. 

Section 3. By the virtue of the office/ the Associational Director of 
Missions is considered an ex-officio member of all Associational Committees. 
For all qualifications eind terins of office see Article VII/ Section 1. 

ARTICLE VI - Duties of Officers 
Section 1. It shall be the duty of the Moderator of the Association to 
preside over the Annual Sessions/ and at the quarterly meetings of the Executive 
Committee. As the presiding officer/ he shall open the meetings punctually 
as the appointed time, enforce the rules / preserve order/ and exercise all 
the perogatives of a presiding officer according to the principles of established 
parlimentary usage. He shall provide leadership for a progressive ideal throughout 



5 



the Association. He shall be elected for a one year term/ and he shall not 

succeed himself for a maximum of two full terms. He shall appoint in advance 

ciny other committees he may deem necessary or advisable. Each of these committees 

shall report at the Annual Meeting for which they are appointed. It shall 

be the responsibility of the Moderator to call any needed meetings at any 

time he deems necesscury. Ttie moderator is considered an ex-officio ment>er 

of all committees. 

Section 2. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to discharge 
the duties of the Moderator in his absence or as his request. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep an accurate record 
of the proceedings of the Association in regulair and special sessions; to 
keep accurate records of quarterly meetings of the Executive CcMnmittee; to 
keep on file the printed minutes and other inportant documents belonging 
to the Association; to furnish the churches with blank letter forms on which 
to make the annual reports to the Association; to superintend the printing 
of the minutes/ and to distribute them to the churches as soon after adjournment 
as possible. For this service the clerk shall be paid annually an amount 
recommended by the Finance Coirmittee and approved by the Association. 

Section 4. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive all funds 
of the Association and to disburse the same in accordance with the budget 
of the Association or for the purposes for vrtiich the funds were contributed. 
To render to the Association an itemized report of the receipts and disbursements 
at the first session of the Annual Meeting. In the treasurer's absence/ 
a member of the Finance Committee shall give the report. The Treasurer shall 
make available through the associational newsletter a quarterly report including 
the contributions of each church in the Association. A quarterly report 
shall be made available at the quarterly meetings of the Executive Committee. 
For this service/ the Treasurer shall be paid annually an amount recommended 
by the Finance Committee and approved by the Association. 

Section 5. The Sunday School Director shall take the initiative in 
promoting inspirational meetings/ study courses/ and leadership classes for 
the churches of the Association. He shall work in cooperation with the 
denominational Sunday school Agencies in promoting the denominational programs; 
and he will be responsible for coordinating and promoting Vacation Bible 
school work in conjunction with the Vacation Bible School Director. He shall 
also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 6. The Discipleship Training Director shall take the initiative 
in promoting the regular meetings projected by the State Convention and be 
available to the churches for help in strengthening the established unions 
and encourage the organization of new unions in churches without tnem. He 
shall also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for 
his organization. 

Section 7. The Brotherhood Director shall be responsible for promoting 
missionary education within our Association and be available to the churches 
to assist in strengthening orgeinizations and programs of existing units. 
He shall also work with the Nominating Correnittee in enlisting leadership 
for his organization. 

Section 8. The WMU Director shall be responsible for promoting missionary 
education within our Association eind she shall be available in the churches 
to assist in promoting and establishing new Baptist Women and Baptist Women 
Auxiliary units / and shall assist in strengthening the organizations and 
programs of existing units. She shall also work with the Nominating Committee 
in enlisting leadership for her organization. 

Section 9. The Vacation Bible School Director shall work in conjunction 
with the Sunday School Director in enlisting and training workers/ planning 



6 



and organizing for the annual Vacation Bible School Clinic. 

Section 10. The Music Directory shall the the initiative in promoting 
the meetings cind activities suggested by the state music leadership and be 
available to the churches to help in strengthening their music programs. 
The Music Director will also be responsible for the music at the associatinal 
and Executive Committee meetings. He shall also work with the Nominating 
Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 11. The Pianist will be responsible for playing the piano at 
all associational and Executive Committee meetings. 

Section 12. The Evangelism Chairman will work with the Evamgelism program 
in planning/ promoting/ and coordinating all evangelistic activities for 
the Association in conjunction with the Director of Missions. 

ARTICLE VII - Director of Missions 
Statement of Purpose and Position Title: 

The office or position will be known as the Director of Missions for the 
Stony Fork Missionary Baptist Association. The Director of Missins shall 
provide responsible leadership in the work of the Association through performing 
such basic functions as the planning/ correlation/ and iirplementation of 
programs of programs/ program services/ and ministries of the Association; 
counsel the churches; agencies of needs / problems/ and potentialities/ with 
the the Association; and interpret to the churches the program resources 
and other assistance available from the Baptist State Convention and Southern 
Baptist Convention agencies. 

Section 1. RESPONSIBILITIES 

A. Planning and Coordination 

1. Lead the Association in strategy planning; establishing and 
maintaining a long-range program. Lead the Association to set goals and 
encourage the churches to work toward them. 

2. Coordinate the associational work and meetings by serving as 
ex-officio member of all committees. 

3. Work with program officers and the Nominating Coiranittee is selecting 
and enlisting leaders for organizations and committees of the Association. 

4. Counsel/ encourage/ and lead in training the associational officers. 
B. Education and Promotion 

1. Seek to assist the pastors cind the churches in programs suitable 
for their growth and developanent / recognizing the differences in size and 
diversity or membership/ utilizing persuasion to promote fellowship and cooperation. 

2. Seek out in cooperation with the Missions Committee/ places 
of missions need and seek to enlist and appropriate church to meet these 
needs. In the event no church (es) can be enlisted/ upon the instruction 

of the Missions Committee/ the Director of Missions may lead in such a program 
in the name of Stony Fork Baptist Association. 

3. Promote church organizational programs; Sunday School/ Disciple- 
ship training/ Church Music, Brotherhood, WMU, and Vacation Bible School 

and Leadership Training. 

4. Promote church assistance programs: Evangelism, Stewardship, 
and Family Life. 

5. Plan for and promote simultaneous efforts, such as: World 
Missions Conferences, revival crusades, enlargement campaigns, training school, 
etc. 

6. Prepare in cooperation with the Missins Committee an annual 
associational calendar. Prepare a monthly associational newsletter for distribution 
in the Association. 

7. Attend denominational meetings and conferences as budget and 
time considerations permit. 



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8. Report to the executive bocird at its regular meetings and to 
the Association in annual session. 
C. Service Ministry 

1. Provide counsel and help as requested by pastors and churches. 

2. Serve as pulpit supply/ assist in church surveys/ and conduct 
studies cind revivals as requested in keeping with terms of employment. Pulpit 
supply for a period of 4 weeks. 

3. Mcinage the associational office/ supervise cissociational enployees, 
and maintain equipment of the Association. 

4. Cooperate with the Finance Conrdttee in planning the budget 
and promoting giving to the Association. 

5. Establish cind announce office hours to best utilize the division 
of time between the assocational office and field responsibilities. 

6. Always working through the pastor, the Director of Missions 
will be available to offer aid to churches in need of assistance. No program 
will be conducted for a church without the invitation of the pastor and/or 
church. In the event the church is without a pastor, the Director of Missions 
will respond to requests from the church leadership. 

Section 2. TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT 

A. Term of Office - The Director of Missions shall be called for an 
indefinite term of service. 

B. Remuneration - Remuneration will be recommended by the Missions 
and Finance Committees and approved by Stony Fork Baptist Association. 

C. Honorariums - Honorariums received for pulpit supply, weddings, 
funerals/ revivals/ and pastoral service/ not directly related to his normal 
responsibilities; shall be considered personal remuneration. 

D. Work Schedule - Work schedules will vary, with weekends normally 
being kept for services in churches in the Association. 

E. Work Accountability - The Missions Coirenittee pledges itself to a 
ministry of loyalty/ support/ and loving encouragement of the Director of 
Missins, so that under the leadership of the Spirit of God/ he may render 
the most effective service possible. 

F. Both parties must give a thirty day notice before termination. 
Section 3. QUALIFICATIONS 

A. Spiritual - A canmitted Christian with a sense of definite call to 
mission service . 

B. Educational - Preferably college and seminary degrees, or their 
equivalent. 

C. Special Knowledge and Skills - Knowledge of Baptist denominational 

life and a willingness to continue to learn; vision/ flexibility, and demonstrated 
leadership, ability in planning, conducting, and evaluating the work of the 
Association. 

D. Character - Christian integrity. 

E. Experience - Pastoral ministry, Christian education or associational 
and other missin experience are necessary. Preferably the associational 
experience should be as a Director of Missions, associational staff member 

or as an active and responsible officer in the Association. The mission 
experience may be in the establishment of and involvement in mission outreach 
and ministry in a mission, church or association. 

ARTICLE VIII - Committees and Their Duties 
Section 1. The committee of Time, Place and Preacher shall be composed 
of three memk)ers. It shall be the duty of the committee to recommend to 
the Association, the churches where the next session will be held, preferably 
to be taken in alphabetical order, and also the preacher for the annual session. 



8 



V 



In order to alleviate ciny haurdship on any one church hosting an associational 
meeting/ it is suggested that two churches may jointly host each meeting. Expenses/ 
meeting places/ and other arrangements will be coordinated by the churches selected. 

Section 2. The Caranittee on Resolutions shadl be conposed of two members. 
It shall be the duty of this comnittee to draw up and present to the Association 
suitable resolutions of appreciation eind expressions of sentiments on any matter 
chosen by the committee or cis directed by the messengers of the Association. 

Section 3. Hie Program Committee shall be cotrposed of the general officers 
of the Association. It shall be the duty of this cotimittee ot prepare and present 
a suggested order of business to be adopted by the Association. When adopted/ 
the program becomes the order of business unless changed by coirmon consent or 
by the vote of the body. 

Section 4. The Committee of Nominations shall be ccxiposed of five members 
(pastors of each church) . It shall be the duty of the committee to prepare for 
the Association the names of individuals as nominees for the following officers 
and reports: Moderator/ Vice-Moderator, Treasurer/ Clerk/ Sunday School director, 
Discipleship Training Director/ Music Director/ Vacation Bible School Director/ 
Brotherhood Director/ Pianist/ Evangelism Director/ and Associational State 
Representatives/ also persons for the following reports shall also be selected: 
Home Missions/ State Missions/ Foreign Missions/ Stewardship, Cooperative Program/ 
Ctoituaries/ Teirperance an Morals/ V.B.S./ W.M.U./ Sunday School/ and any others 
designated by the Association. Representatives for the following shall be selected: 
N.C. Baptist Hospital/ N.C. Childrens Home, Baptist Home for the Aging/ Denominational 
Colleges (Christian Higher Education)/ Denominational Literature/ Annuity Board/ 
Baptist Foundation/ and any others designated by the Association. The Committee 
on Nominations shall be responsible for selection and contacting each of these 
persons for their approval before the annual meeting. The floor shall be open 
for nominations for these officers on the day of the annual meeting. Nominations 
from the floor shall be taken first/ then the Chairperson of the Nominating Comnmittee 
shall give the nomination of the committee. All nominees must be contacted beforehand 
and permission given for acceptance of nomination. The W.M.U. will elect their 
officers. 

Section 5. The Finance Ccxnmittee shall be composed of five members, one 
of which will include the Treasurer of the Association. It shall be the duty 
of this committee to prepare and recommend a budget for the Association and to 
suggest ways and means whereby the budget can be raised by the local churches 
and to secure the cooperation of the churches in raising the budge. The Finance 
Committee will present the proposed budged on the first day of the annual cissociational 
meeting with discussion and adoption scheduled for the second day. The Finance 
Committee shall meet prior to the quarterly Executive Committee Meeting and shall 
prepare a regular form acceptable to the Association/ a detailed financial report 
which shall be given to each member present at the quarterly meeting and the 
annual associational meeting. 

Section 6. The Missions Committee shall be canposed of five members (pastors 
of each church) and this committee shall report to and cooperate with the Executive 
Committee of the Association. The duties of this committee are: (a) to coordinate 
and help promote through the organizations and committees all phases and activities 
of the associational programs, (b) to cooperate with the loca churches in making 
surveys of areas which, in the opinion of the Missions Committee, are not being 
adequately served by the local missionary Baptist work, and to promote and develop 
those new phases of the Missions programs/ (c) to serve in advisory capacity 
to the Director of Missions in all matters pertaining to his work and to serve 
with him in directing and promoting the missions programs of the Association/ 
(d) to provide information and assistance to the departments of State Missions 
of the North Carolina Baptist Convention in meeting local missionary needs / such 



9 



as Missionary peistor's assistance/ promoting mission causes, etc., (e) the Missions 
Comnittee shall meet prior to the Executive CcMiinittee of the Association or at 
any time necessary to discharge its duties, (f) this committee shall have the 
following responsibilities relating to the office of Director of Missions: 

1. Serve as a search committee for a Director of Missions. 

2. Recommend to the Executive Committee the name of the nominee. 

3. Coordinate financial matters with the Baptist State Convention. 

4. Serve as a liaison between the churches and the Director of Missions. 
Section 7. The Constitution and By-Laws Committee shall be composed of 

the Missions Committee and one selected layperson of the Association making six 
members. It shall be the duty of this committee to review and update the Constitution 
and By-Laws as it becomes necessary. This committee will recommend revisions 
and amendments concerning the constitution and by-laws to the Association as 
deemed necessary. They shall meet at least once a year before the annual meeting 
to review cind discuss the constitution. 

Section 8. The Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the 
churches: 

ARTICLE IX - Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of churches 

The Corrmittee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the Churches shall 
be made up of the Missions Committee mentoers. 

Section 1. Any group of baptized believers in Christ desiring to organize 
themselves into missionary Baptist church with the purpose of seeking the recognition 
of, and fellowship and cooperate with this Association, shall be required to 
fulfill the following requirements. They shall submit their request for admission 
to the Director of Missions or the Moderator of the Association, who will in 
turn forward it to the Committee of Petitionary Letters. In addition to the 
letter of request, a church must also furnish a report of work accomplished since 
its organization, a copy of the church covenant, and its articles of faith. 

Section 2. Any church seeking admission into the fellowship of the Association 
must be under the watchcare of the Association for a period of one year before 
it can be admitted. During this interim period, the church shall be expected 
to have part in the support of the causes fostered by the Association, the North 
Carolina State Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention. 

Section 3. the findings of the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall be 
reported at the annual associational meeting or at the Executive Committee meeting 
with a recorrmendation either for or against admission. 

Section 4. If the church is accepted under the watchcare of the Association, 
the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall recommend at the end of the year that 
the church be accepted into full fellowship provided that examination of that 
years work done and a study of the cooperative spirit of that church proves to 
be in accordance to the principles of the churches of the Association. A two-thirds 
majority vote of the Messengers or Executive Committee members present shall 
be needed for such an action to be completed. There will be an appropriate program 
conducted during the annual meeting to formally welcome this new church into 
the Association. 

Section 5. For a sister cooperative Missionary Baptist church that is affiliated 
with the Southern Baptist Convention, that wishes to join or transfer status, 
the same procedure is needful with the exception of the one year of associatinal 
watchcare. Upon receipt of letter of request, the Committee of Petitions shall 
recommend its findings to the Executive Committee, and after a thirty day period 
of investigation, the discretion of the Executive Committee shall be used if 
immediate acceptance of fellowship is possible. If accepted, a program of welcoming 
shall be presented at the annual associational meeting. 



10 



ARTICLE X - Amendnients ![ 
The constitution or any part of the constitution shall be amended at the ''j 
annual eissociational meeting in August/ with the acceptance by two-thirds majority 
vote. It is suggested that all changes and recommendations of amendments be 
submitted two months prior to the annual meeting/ to the Constitution and By-Laws 
Committee for their careful consideration; however/ ciny messenger hcis the right 
to submit proposed changes in accordance with this eirticle i 

By-Laws 

1. All associational meetings shall be c^ned and closed in prayer. 

2. "Roberts Rules of Order" shall be used as a guideline for parlimentary 
procedure in all associational meetings. The Moderator will be responsible for 
having a copy of same at all meetings an6 a copy of peurlimentary procedures and 
the gavel of the Association shall be transferred upon succession of the moderator. 

3. All associationed officers shall exercise authority over their department 
and shall give a financial accounting to the Finance Committee for monies expended. 

4. Election and installation of officers shall take place on the last 
day of the annual association meeting in August/ and these officers shall be 
responsible for planning/ coordinating/ and providing leadership for the coming 
yecir in the Association. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS 

Time/ Place and Preacher CcMnmittee will be amended to the hosting church 
pastor or a preacher of his choice will be the preacher for the associational 
meetings. Committee membership will be filled according to the number of people 
participating in associational work. 

Article VIII - Committees and their duties/ Section 4 amended to: recommendationsi 
frcxn the Nominating Committee shall be presented first/ then nominations will j 
be taken from the floor. 




11 



PROCEEDINGS 



The one hundred and thirty second annual meeting of Stony Fork 
Missionary Association was held for the first day on August 6, 1993 
at Long Ridge Baptist Church. The meeting was conducted in the 
following order beginning at 8:30 in the morning. 

8:30 Call to order by the moderator. Max West. 
8:33 Song "Precious Memories". 

8:35 Devotion - Pastor of Long Ridge, John McCoury, from Psalms 
65. Our purpose is to worship God. As the worship goes up 
and the witness goes out, then the blessings come down. 
Prayer led by George Berry. 

8:45 Adoption of Program - moved to approve program with changes 
already made and those that may become necessary. Seconded 
and approved. Reports were moved for adoption, seconded and 
approved at the time presented. 

8:55 Roll Call: Bailey's Camp 6, Doe Ridge 3, Laytown 6, Long 
Ridge 5, Mt. Ephraim 0, Rock Spring 3, Sandy Flat 4, Other 
3. Total 30. 

9:00 Recognition of New Pastors and Workers: Pastor at Long 

Ridge, John McCoury recognized. 
9:05 Vacation Bible School: Barbara West - Did not go to the 

state meeting, so did not have an associat ional meeting. 

Six churches had VBS with total attendance of 203. 

Materials will change somewhat next year, and go to a 5 days 

only curriculum. Sandy Flat and Rock Spring gave reports 

on their VBS's. 

9:10 Foreign Missions: George Berry spoke to this report. 

90, 000 people were baptized in Brazil over the past 10 
years. 

Also read a report about Walter Ford, a local person who is 
a missionary in Malawi, Africa, who was involved in a 
violent incident there. 

9:15 Sunday School: Bonnie Walsh 

9:20 WMU: Eunice Luttrell 

9:25 Finance Report: Edith Gryder. Copies of proposed budget 

were distributed. (Will vote on budget tomorrow). 
9:30 Break 

9:55 Home Missions: Vera Dula 

10:00 State Missions: Wanda Winkler. Speaker - Roy Holder. The 
Language Mission Division also receives support in addition 
to those in the report. We have many opportunities for 
missions all around us. The Baptist Men's van is already 
in the Midwest helping the flood victims, 10 men from Boone 
have gone to relieve the original crew. The Church 
Extension Dept. receives 1/2 of its funds from State 
Missions Offerings. I am a SFA representative for this 
Dept. We need new work all over N. C. today. 52. 77. of N. C. 
people are unchurched. N. C. has more people living in 
apartments, trailer parks, condos, etc. , than any other 



12 



state and 95% of them are unchurched. You have to go to 
them in ministry, they will not come to your church. My 
appeal is, with the tremendous number of people who need 
help, we need to support State Missions more than ever. 
Put the needs of our neighbor as our top priority for the 
coming year. 

10:10 Children's Homes: Jeri Triplett - Speaker - Steve Hoffman. 
BCH provides the pleasant memories of childhood for many 
children. The staff works hand in hand to stand in the gap 
for these children. So many come from broken homes and have 
unpleasant memories of their home life. Our staff is there 
to provide guidance. Thank you very much, because through 
your financial resources, you help us reach out and touch 
these children. There is so much hurt and so many cannot 
or do not share their pain. But they will walk through that 
door because they want to have that hope that comes through 
Christian faith. Live out day by day what you are taught 
in the Bible. God makes pleasant memories. 

10:30 Retirement Homes: Mamie Craig - Speaker - Linda 

Blankenship. We are all going to get older! We, as 
Baptist, are making things better for those who are older 
adults. If we, in N. C. , do not begin to change the way we 
feel and act towards older adults, we are going to face a 
crisis within the next 10 years. N. C. is tenth in the U. S. 
with population of 65 and over. The average age coming into 
our homes now is 90. 

We have Christian, quality care and we are restraint free 
at the Health Care Center in Asheville. 95% of our 
resident are Baptist. It is because of you and your 
commitment and gifts that we are able to give quality care 
to our older residents. 

10:45 Baptist Hospital: Eunice Luttrell - Bill Yates, the 
speaker, was unable to attend due to illness. 

10:55 Christian Higher Education - Debbie Walsh - Speaker - Sue 
Figzgerald, Mars Hill College. Churches on Mission - 
through your gifts, you are on mission all over the world. 
Colleges on mission - helping students to grow to be leaders 
with a foundation in Jesus Christ. N. C. Baptist students 
see the importance of being involved in missions now. They 
worked to raise money to send missionaries. 29 students 
this summer have served in N. C. , the U. S. and the world. 
Our students serve in the community. Our resource center 
is available to help you reach out to others. Pray for us 
as we try to help N. C. Baptists and pray for me and call me 
if you need help finding any resource. 

11:00 Baptist Foundation: Dale Luttrell - Speaker - Edwin Coates. 

One of my greatest joys is to assist individuals to help the 
numerous institutions you have heard about today. The 
Baptist Foundation helps individuals to be a part of the 
Retirement Homes, Baptist Hospital, Children's Homes, etc., 
or a part of everything through the Cooperative Program 



until the Lord comes again. We can also assist you with a 
will to insure that your family receives the gifts you want 
them to have. We have a toll free number if you need help 
with this. 

E. 0. Bustle spoke to this report. Through donations in 
my brother's name to the Baptist Foundation, he had been 
a part of missions for 18 years through the Cooperative 
program. We could send the Gospel around the world 40 times 
if we would all be a part of this. 
11:45 Annual Message: John McCoury - Luke 24:47 "And that 

repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his 
name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem. " Have you 
been to Jerusalem lately? The message goes out three ways- 
for times past, the present time and sometime in the future. 
Let the Lord lead, guide and direct us. Let us find 
ourselves in the work beginning in the church. Meet 
yourself in the word. Be in the center of God's will, 
not behind or ahead of him. Some basics to look back on 
and get in order: 2 Chronicles, Chapter 29. 

1. Temple - place to worship the Lord, had been torn 
down but then rebuilt. The gospel is unchangeable and 
everlasting. Are your church doors open or closed up? 
Do people feel welcome there? 

2. Come together - leadership should be strong in all 
areas. Also need followers, don't stand back and wait for 
other people, step out. 

3. Be apart from the world - church should be separated 
and sanctified. We need a house cleaning and open up 
the inner part - find the old alter. 

4. Prayer - can turn a community upside down. We need a 
closet ministry. Get things back in order. A puzzle is 
not complete until all the pieces are in place. 

5. Lay aside the things that don't work and try other 
things that could work. God has a plan to get things 
back in order. 

6. Be in harmony - song worship, offerings, tithes, 
without ceasing. Everything working good results in the 
church being ready to receive babes in Christ, ready to 
nurture until Christ comes again. 

12:30 Adjourn - Lunch 



14 



FOREIGN HISSIGN BOARD 

Your Bridge to the World: Yesterday/ today and tomorrow. 

Bridge Builders 

Southern Baptist share a rich heritage of missions that has endured for a 
century and a half. Todays Southern Baptist missionaries join a long list 
of servants like Lottie Moon/ William Bagby and Bill Wallace in sharing the 
mystery found in Colossions 1:27: "Christ in you, the hope of glory." They 
are builders laying the foundation for a bridge you can cross to reach a 
needy world. 

And the building does not end in 1992. Until the Lord comes / the Foreign 
Mission Board will be about the business of delivering the salvation message 
to people groups around the globe. We know "they are precious in His sight". 

Bridging the Distance 
In 1992 Southern Baptists joined believers in 129 countries to share the 
rich message of Christ's forgiveness. Just as for the last 148 years / that 
message brought a bountiful harvest. 

New Life 

Through churches related to Southern Baptist efforts/ 1992 proved to be another 
record-setting year for baptisms around the world: 251/901. This represents 
almost an 8 percent increase over the previous yeair. Also, 1992 was the 
fourth year since 1987 during which world-wide baptisms set a new record. 

New Fellowships 

Another record setter: 1/606 churches were bom in 1992. This 5.8 percent 
increase in one year demonstrates the aims of the FMB/ which strives for 
continual evangelism through the establishment of churches. 

New Strength in Congregations 
The total number of churches relating to Southern Baptist foreign missions 
crested the 30/000 mark for the first time/ finishing with 32/797 by the 
end of 1992. This represents a growth of more than 17 percent in one year. 

Supporting the Bridge 
As you prayed for missions in 1992, you gave missions of dollars through 
the Cooperative Program and the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering. You also 
sent special financial gifts for world hunger and relief. The Lottie Moon 
offering reached its highest total ever - more than $81.4 mission given for 
world evangelism and ministry. 

Crossing the Bridge 
Foreign mission efforts continued with milestone results in 1992. Southern 
Baptist missionaries went in all directions to spread the good news of Jesus 
Christ. Their travels took them into the heart of the worlds problems - 
hunger/ war, earthquakes/ ethnic strife/ ignorance ad hopelessness. 

Your Place on the Bridge 
God has provided Southern Baptists with a proven way to reach the world for 
Christ. Is He asking you to take a specific job in building more extensions 
cn the mission bridge? His plans for foreign missions/ and for you, are 
marvelous. We encourage your to find God's place for you - on the bridge. 



Nellie Coffey 



VACATIGN BIBLE SCHOOL 



I do not have much to report on Vacation Bible School for 1993. We did not 
attend the State VBS Clinic. I could not get enough people interested in 
going. Therefore/ our Association did not have a clinic this year. 

Some of the churches did not use Southern Baptist materials. I am not here 
to tell you what materials to use, but to assist you in an way that I can 
with your Vacation Bible School. 

Six churches in our Association had Vacation Bible Schools with a total attendance 
of 203. 

The materials will change somewhat next year cind go to 5 days curriculum 
only. 



Barbara West 



16 



SUNDAY SCBOQL 

Matthew 9:37-38: '"nien said He unto His disciples / the harvest truly is 
plenteous/ but the laborers sure few; Pray ye therefore the Lord of the harvest/ 
that He will send forth laborers into the harvest." 

It is time to pray cind make plans to make the 1993-94 Sunday School year 
a successful and enriching experience for leaders and members also. We must 
plan to reach people and honor the Lord. We should try to encourage all 
our workers in Sunday School to participate in Preparation Week cuid October 
Outreach Month. We should set a goal cuid strive hard to grow in number. 

A church should regard its Sunday School as one of the agencies by which 
it can meet its obligation to train up the rising generation in fear of God. 
When this is the case the church is really at work in the Sunday School. 
It would be a happy circumstance if facts would authorize the definition 
of a Sunday School; a church activity at work on the Lord's day for the good 
of the children. 

Bonnie Walsh 



MOHAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

We have five churches with a WMU orgsinization. All or our WMU's are doing 
a great work in their own church. 

We had five ladies go to Ridgecrest for the state meeting. We had our annual 
meeting in May at Mt. Ephraim. All five churches were represented. We had 
a missionary from Africa speak/ Mrs. Andrews. We contributed to the Marie 
Triplett fund to raise money for her liver transplant expenses. 

This year I hope that we will be more active in doing mission work together. 
This year we do not have enough people interested in a prayer retreat. I 
think a retreat is good for us as it renews our strength in our spiritual 
life. Be praying abut this for our coming year. 

Linda Mills cind I went with Clarks Creek Church to Ridgecrest for a retreat 
last year. 

I need your prayers that I will let God lead me in the coming year as to 
what he hcis for our WMU to do. 



Eunice Luttrell 



FINANCE REPOECr 



Balance July 31, 1992 $4909.68 

Contributions 6991 . 32 

Bailey's Camp $1232.10 ($50.00 mins., 582.00 N.Y.) 

Doe Ridge 448.00 ($40.00 mins., 150.00 N.Y.) 

Laytown 294.00 ( 84.00 mins.) 

Long Ridge 800.00 ( 20.00 mins., 200.00 N.Y.) 

Mt. Ephraim 320.00 ( 20.00 mins.,) 

Rock Spring 1724.72 ( 25.00 mins.) 

Sandy Flat 1761.29 (100.00 mins.) 

Other 20.00 

$11,901.00 

Expenditures 6 , 742 . 99 

Director of Missions $2500.00 

Annuity (DOM) 416.00 

Clerk Honorarium 250.00 

Treasurer Honorarium 250 . 00 

Assoc. Minutes 742.00 

Discipleship Training 110.00 

($50.00 M Night speaker 

(60.00 conference) 

WMU Expenses 100.00 

Youth Retreat 155.00 

Telephone 30.01 

Staitps 11.60 

New York Speaker 100.00 

New York Project 2078.38* 

Balance 5,158.01 

New York Mission total -1,495.70 

$3662.31 

*This amount included funds from previous year. 



Edith Gryder 



18 



BOMB MISSIONS 



Why Hocre Missions? 

To go where the hurt is, to minister in hurricane devastated Dade County, Florida, 
cr to start £< church in Detroit's inner city "I am come that ye might have life 
c<nd have it more abundantly", said Jesus. 

Every church member a witness, every churcJ-i ministering and starting churches, | 
then the hurt will begin to heal. | 

New churcheiS reache more people per-meraber cind therefore grow more rapidly and 
minister more effectively. That is why one of the Home Mission Boards 's priorities 
is starting new churches. 

Southern Baptists baptize approximately 400/000 people each year. We rejoice 
•in these decisions for Christ, but the yeaurly baptism count has changed little 
since 1953. It now takes 44 Southern Baptists to lead one person to Christ. 
The Foreign Mission Board estimates that 172 million people in the United States 
of Aircirics are lost. 

Home missions is a partnership of Home Mission Board Baptist State ccnventions , 
associations and churches. In these tough economic times, increasing numbers 
of bi vocational workers eind volunteers are needed to reach America for Christ. 

An unmet need in your area may be your call to Home Missicrs. ^ 



Vera Dula 



HUB 

Home Mission Board, sbc 

Qkrisi for Our Nation 

1992 ANNUAL REPORT 

The Home Mission Board (HMB) is a missionary-sending agency of the Southern Baptist 
Convention (SBC). Headquartered in Atlanta, Ga., the HMB's purpose is to serve Southern Baptists 
by assisting churches to proclaim the gospel of Jesus Christ, start and grow New Testament 
congregations, and minister to people in the name of Christ. 

At the end of last year, 4,868 missions personnel were serving in the United States, the 
Caribbean, American Samoa, and Canada. The HMB also had endorsed more than 2,200 chaplains 
who were serving in healthcare agencies, institutions, businesses, the military, and pastoral-care roles. 
More than 2,400 Mission Service Corps volunteers were serving on home mission fields. During the 
year there were 367,847 baptisms and 1,281 church starts. 

Approximately half the HMB's support comes from individual SBC churches through the 
annual Annie Armstrong Easter Offering for Home Missions. In 1992, gifts to the offering totaled 
$37.61 million, up almost 6 percent from the 1991 total. One hundred percent of the offering goes 
to support the work of home missionaries in the field. The 1993 Annie Armstrong Easter Offering 
goal is $38 million. About 36 percent of the HMB's income comes from the denomination's 
Cooperative Program. 

Home missions is a partnership of the HMB, state conventions, associations, and churches. 
The HMB's strategy is to help start churches, ministry endeavors, and evangelism efforts that will 
grow to self-support or be carried on by local churches or associations. 

The following is a summary of program/support ministry highlights from 1992: 

Chaplaincy Ministries--The 2.293 Southern Baptists now serving as chaplains and pastoral counselors 
reported 24,000 professions of faith and 4,600 baptisms. 

Alternatives to Abortion-- Workers in 23 crisis pregnancy centers received training from the HMB. 
As a result of the ministry of these centers, 2,164 babies were born and 832 women found faith in 
Christ. 

Church Loans-More than 1,100 churches had active loans totaling $115 million. These loans 
purchased, refinanced, remodeled, or constructed 106 buildings and purchased 9 building sites. 
Language Missions-Home missionaries and pastors in the Language Church Extension Division 
serve among 102 ethnic groups using 98 languages and dialects. 

Personal Evangelism-During the Southern Baptist Convention in Indianapolis, 1,353 volunteers 
canvassed 45,235 residences, conducted a religious survey, and shared the gospel with 2,905 
individuals, 361 of whom made professions of faith. 

Prayer and Spiritual Awakening-A national team began efforts to enhance effective prayer and 
revival ministries in churches. The Intercessory Prayeriine grew from 7,500 calls in 1985 to 130,000 
last year. 

Volunteers-Over 71,000 Southern Baptist adults, college students, and youth group members 
volunteered for long- and short-term projects. More than 58,000 volunteers resjX)nded to disaster 
relief efforts in Florida, Louisiana, and Hawaii. 

Special Ministries-Southern Baptists minister to seamen in 37 port cities and 200 missionaries are 
involved in ministries related to college students, resorts, special events, and diplomats. 

1350 Spring Street NW • Atlanta. GA 30367-5601 • (404) 898-7000 

A Southern Bapasi Convention agency supporud by the Cooperaave Pro-am and the Annie Armstrong Easter Offenn^ 



20 



I, 



STATE MISSIONS 

The 1993 State Missions goal is 1.8 million dollars. Last year we only collected 
three-fourths of that amount. 

About 10% of State Missions ironey provides scholarships for Baptist students 
attending on of the convention's colleges or universities/ help for the new 
center for Congregational Health at Baptist Hospital and 20% helps support the 
conference center at N.C. Baptist Assembly at Casewell. 

About 8% of the State Missions Offering cissists N.C. Baptist Men. This includes 
Camp Caraway, the disaster relief truck and medical dental bus/ the model agricultural 
missions farm, and RA sports events. 

About 10% helps Woman's Missionary Union with Camp I^undo Vista and other Girls 
in Action and Acteen camps. 

About 1.5% helps Fruitland Baptist Bible Institute vrtiich prepares ministers 
for service in churches. 

The Week cf Prayer and giving to State Missions is Sept. 12-19. Please do your 
part in praying and giving of your money to help in cir State Missions fund 
this year. A shortfall this year cculd prevent someone from learning about 
Christ. 



Wanda Winkler 



21 



HOME MISSION BOARD BOLD MISSION THRUST 
GOALS AND RESULTS 





1992 


1 993 




Qoais 


Results 


Goals Results 




Af\f\ AflA 
4UU ,UUU 


OCT BJT 


41 2,500 


MuU 11 


^ OA AHA 


1 ,11^4 


189.750 




1 Ol AAA 


lie 471 
OO |4 f J 


104.000 


will lUI oil 




117, 350 


118.750 


MEMBERSHIP' (Thousands) 




1 S 365 

1 3 f <* w w 


15.740 


AM WORSHIP ATT.: (Thousands) 


4,200 


4,610 


4,300 


PERCENTAGE C3F CHURCHES GROWING 


59% 


57% 


61% 


NUMBER OF CHURCHES (Constituted) 


40,000 


38,458 


40.500 


NUMBER OF MISSIONS OPERATED 


•♦,004 


O , 4 4 W 


4,830 


CONGREGATIONS 


44 ,004 


Ad AQll 
44 , 03»0 


45.330 


AnQlo 


OS, 1 0£ 


IT ASS 
•9 9 , 4 3 V 


38.534 


Ethnic 






5,451 


Black 


1 ,20^ 




1.345 


NEW CHURCH STARTS 


1 CAA 


1 9 A1 


1 .500 


AnQlo 


OA A 


RAa 

O 4 v 


900 


Ethnic 






525 


Black 




117 
1 1 f 


75 


% CHURCHES WITH MINISTRIES 


Oovo 




60% 


CHAPLAINS (Total) 


£ , ODO 


9 9Q1 


2,435 


Military 


1 1 4A 
1 , 1 4U 


1 t\'\A 
1 , U J 4 


1,180 


Hospital 


7Q 1 


/Of 


805 


Institutional 


OA. 1 
c4 1 


90 7 


255 


Business/Industrial 


ISO 


9 9 5 
^ ^ 


195 


MISSION PERSONNEL (Total) 


4 , 1 / 


4 , O O O 


4,275 


Plantors 


040 


Q 1 Q 
9 O 9 


923 


Pastors 


9 AH'l 
£ ,UoO 


1 Q RQ 
1 , 9 09 


2,109 


Ministries 


o ^ o 


AT A 
4 f 4 


647 




386 


382 


389 


Evang. Missionaries 


105 


89 


1 1 1 


Other Missionaries 


124 


1,005 


96 


VOLUNTEERS (Total) 


53,900 


71,740 


56,475 


Mission Service Corps 


1,400 


1,611 


1,475 


Short Term 


52,500 


58,673 


55,000 


Evangelism & Language 




11,456 





1 395 

1 7 w «^ 


2000 


OUalO 


Goals 


437 500 


500 000 

w V/ w , \J \J \J 


201 ,250 


230 000 


1 10,000 


1 25,000 


126,250 


145,000 


16,100 


17.000 


4,500 


5,000 


65% 


75% 


41,500 


44,000 


5,162 


6,000 


46,662 


50,000 


39,238 


41 ,000 


5,893 


7,000 


1 ,531 


2,000 


1 ,500 


1 ,500 


900 


900 


525 


525 


75 


75 


64% 


75% 


2,605 


3,000 


1 ,230 


1,360 


898 


1 ,025 


259 


310 


218 


305 


4,481 


5,000 


1 ,050 


1 ,250 


2,161 


2,300 


689 


800 


395 


410 


123 


160 


63 


80 


62,625 


77,000 


1,625 


2,000 


61,000 


75,000 



Notes: The subcategories of Mission Personnel for 1992 do not total 4.868 due to the doul 
Source: Research Division, Planning and Finance Section, HMB revised PBJ 3/24/93 



22 



c 



1993 ASSOCiATIOIMAL REPORT 

BAPTIST CHILDREN'S HOMES OF NORTH CAROLINA 
PO BOX 338 • THOMASVILLE 27361-0338 • C919] 472-1000 



hris starts college at Nordi Carolina State 
this fall on a football scholarship. After 
leading Thomasville to a state champi- 
onship in 1991, Chris also earned 
national honor society recognition, was active in the 
community counseling drug abusers... and became 
a Christian at Mills Home. 



Kaihy married a Christian young man who was 
a volimteer at Broyhill Home, where she lived. She 
continues her education at Haywood Technical 
College while working and becoming a yoimg wife. 
She and her husband, Kris, are members at Wood- 
land Baotist Church, v/here she was active in 
leading children's programs, even as a Broyhill 
resident 

Several rows of supportive staff members cried 
during the wedding when the minister asked, "'Who 
gives this woman to be married?* Child care 
worker Jim Johnson responded, *Her mother and I 
do." 

"Her mother," was Jim's wife, Vivian. Together, 
Jim and Vivian helped Kathy develop from an 
angry and withdrawn child, to a beautiful, confi- 
dent. Christian leader. 

Ashley was grozoing up too fast., and her 
parents didn't know how to handle it They wanted 
to treat her like a child; she wanted adult freedoms. 
When their constant clashing came to blows, they 
knew they needed help. 

Through the family clarification program at 
Mills Home, both Ashley and her parents learned 
the roles they played in the fcunily conflict, and how 
to listen, forgive and adjust in the futiu-e. 

"We're very grateful to Baptist Children's 
Homes," said Ashley's mother, Victoria. "I don't 
know what we would have done. I don't know 
what would have happ>ened to Ashley. I've had 
friends say to me, 1 never knew there was a place 
like that'" 

Well, there is a place like that 

Thank God, 

Baptist Children's Hon\es in 1992-93 served 
1,453 children and their families through programs 
of intentionalized services at 13 facilities across 
North Oirolina. 

Those facilities include four residential care 
campuses; seven emergency care homes; two homes 
for behaviorally troubled girls; therapeutic camping 
for boys; a maternity home; a home for teen-age 



mothers and their babies and a 
model daycare fedlity. 

Baptist Churches, 
through the Thanksgiving 
Offering, Cooperative 
Program and direct gifts 
fimded about one-third of 
BCH's $10 million budget A 
significant soiu-ce of income continues to be from 
estate gifts from those who remember children in 
their wills. 

BCH's model daycare service took a giant step 
June 27 v.-hen the new $1 million, 10,000 sq. ft 
Fleshman-Pratt Early Childhood Education Center 
was dedicated. It will accommodate 75 infants, 
toddlers and two-year olds. 

During dedication, Robin Britt N.C Secretary of 
the NC Department of Himian Resources, said BCH 
is "a true model of how young children can be 
shaped, nurtured aiui loved," and that "we will be 
looking at institutions like the Fleshman-Pratt Early 
Childhood Education Center as we find models to 
replicate." 

T. Winfield Blackwell, president of the 
Fleshman-Pratt Foundation, whose lead gift started 
construction of the building, said, "Think how many 
children will be raised and shaped by the dedicated 
staff who serve here, aixd surely a goodly nim^r 
will be developed, not only to be good citizens, but 
active ministers in Cod's service." 

Churches interested in beginiung or improving 
their daycare nunistry can get free help from direc- 
tor Mary Lou Dickey. Call (919) 472-3503. 

BCH also dedicated a counselor's ledge at 
Cameron Boys Camp; completed a strategic plan- 
ning cycle for the next three years; celebrated the 
50th anniversary of Odimi Home in Pembroke; 
completed a three-year partnership with the Baptist 
Children's Homes of Sao Paulo, Brazil; and pro- 
duced a new video about BCH, available Aug. 15. 

Swelling with emotion at the dedication of her 
itew building. Daycare Services Director Mary Lou 
Dickey promised, "we will not fail" those who trust 
BCH with their children. 

Michael C Blackwell, who celebrated his 10th 
aniuversary as president of BCH July 1, echoes that 
pronuse. "Baptist Children's Homes has been a 
cutting-edge ministry for North Carolina Baptists 
siru:e 1885. As a disintegrating society moves the 
edges further arul further, we're honing our ministry 
sharper and sharper. Thar\k you. North Carolina 
Baptists, for your suppwrt." 



23 



1993: THE BEST OF TIMES 



Did you know that: 

In 1993, North Carolina reached place 
number ten (10) among all the states in 
the United States in regard to the size of 
its adult population over the age of 
sixty-five (65) 

That one-half of all the people who 
have ever hved to be sixty-five (65) are 
now living 

The fastest growing segment of North 
Carolina Baptist life is composed of 
those adults eighty-five (85) and older 
and that by the year 2000 that age 
category will double in size 

That by the year 1996 North Carolina's 
"Baby Boomers" will be turning fifty-five 
(55) every 18 seconds 

That by the year 2010 one out of every 
two people living in North Carolina will 
be fifty (50) years of age or older? 

What do figures like those above mean 
for North Carolina Baptists? 

They point to the fact that one of the 
greatest needs facing our Convention 
as we move into the year 2000 is the 
provision of quality, affordable long- 
term cars sep/ices to functionally 
impaired Older Adults through the 
expansion of existing long-term care 
facilities, and through the development 
of creative approaches to long-term 
care such as rural home healSi 
services, community day care 
programs, and respite programs for 
homebound care providers. 

In an attempt to meet the above 
mentioned need. Baptist Retirement 
Homes of North Carolina, Inc. in 1993: 

Opened the Rickman Nursing Care 
Center in Asheville, North Carolina (a 
100 bed Medicaid certified nursing care 
facility). 

24 



The Rickman Center is a state-of-the-art 
long-term care facility that has been 
developed to meet the needs of the 
poor elderly in Western North Carolina. 
(80% of the resident population will be 
recipients of benevolent funding). 

Renovated the Albemarle Baptist Home 
in Stanly Baptist Association and 
renamed it flie Taylor House. The 
Taylor House has no financial 
requirements for admission and is 
designed to provide care to the assisted 
living level of care resident, regardless 
of his/her ability to pay for the long- 
term care services provided. 

Developed a new addition to the 
Brookridge Health Care Unit in Winston- 
Salem in order to provide an area for 
small group work with residents 
suffering from dementia. This state-of- 
the-art program will enable Baptist 
Retirement Homes' staff to improve the 
qualify of life experienced by members 
of its resident community who are 
mentally impaired. 

Baptist Retirement Homes is keenly 
aware of the fact that without the 
support of North Carolina Baptists none 
of the above would have been possible. 
As a result of the prayers and funding 
that the "Homes" receives through the 
Cooperative Program and the North 
Carolina Offering For Older Adults, it 
has been able to offer hope to many 
Older Adults whose future would have 
been uncertain without the caring 
involvement of North Carolina Baptists. 
It is because of you that our institution 
has been able to make life for many 
Older Adults in 1993 . . . The Best of 
Times. 

Thank you North Carolina Baptists for 
your support! 

William B. Stillerman, President 
Baptist Retirement Homes 
of North Carolina, Inc. 



Meeting the 
Challenges of 
Health Care 

1993 



J\eportto 

the Associations 




Touching Lives With Hope' 



pounded in 1922, Baptist 
Hospital is a missionary enterprise 
of the Baptist churches of North 

Carolina. The essence of our pur- 
pose is to carry out a ministry of 

healing as taught by Jesus Christ. 
We remain as fully committed to 

this mission as were our founding 

fathers. In the midst of changing 
health-care norms, we have not, nor 

will we, deviate from this mission. 

The following paragraphs report, 
not only basic facts, but various 
results of how we have sought in 

the last year to remain true to our 
heritage while providing quality 
health care at affordable prices. 



PROVIDERS AND RECIPIENTS OF HEALING 
Our healing team now consists of 5,852 employees. The Medical 
Center (NCBH and BGSM) {personnel total employment is fast 
approaching 9,000 people making us the second largest employer in 
Forsyth County. In our 806-bed facility, we had 23.247 inpatient 
admissions. Our Outpatient Department, physicians' clinics, and other 
related departments received 490,667 patient visits. 

Our chaplaincy division joined with our health-care professionals to 
provide spiritual and emotional healing. With 15-40 chaplains present 
at various times, 52,934 ministries were provided to patients, families, 
staff and groups. 

A new department of our Pastoral Care program named the Center 
for Congregational Health was given birth. Its purpose is to ( 1 ) train 
Intentional Interim pastors; (2) train church leaders; (3) provide a 
minister's assessment program; (4) establish a Minister's Help Line 
providing an opportunity for church leaders to receive guidance via a 
telephone call. The Pastoral Counseling Division opened a new coun- 
seling center in Wilmington bringing our total counseling centers to 
1 1 across the state. The centers provided 16,205 counseling sessions. 

POINTS OF EXCELLENCE 

( 1 ) The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organiza- 
tions ranks Baptist Hospital in the top 9% of all hospitals in the nation. 

(2) We performed our first pancreas n^ansplant and first double organ 
transplant (pancreas and kidney) this year. 

(3) We are one of only 26 comprehensive cancer care centers in the 
nation, treating more cancer patients than any hospital from Balti- 
more, Md. to Atlanta, Ga. 

(4) Quality infant through adolescence care in our Brenner Children's 
Hospital. 

(5) Our neonatal transport team is the largest in North Carolina and 
one of the 10 largest in the U.S. 

(6) Our Level I (highest awarded) Trauma Center has 2,100 admis- 
sions a year. 



The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, 



Incorporate 

25 



SUPERB FINANCIAL STEWARDSHIP 

In the midst of escalating health-care costs, we have a proven 

record of excellent stewardship. 

(1) The latest report of the North Carolina Database Com- 
mission comparing hospital major services charges vs. 
Baptist Hospital reveals, for our most frequent diagnoses: 

Duke - 36% higher 

Carolina's Medical Center (Charlotte) - 36.5% higher 
UNC-Chapel Hill - 28% higher 
Average statewide - 9% higher 

(2) We are one of only 17 similar hospitals nationally with a 
"AA" bond credit rating. 

(3) Averaging the last two years and the projection for 1993, 
the Consumer I'rice Index will average 3.9% and the 
Medical CPI will average 9.7%. Baptist Hospital charge 
increases for the same period will average 3.3%, well 
under both the above mentioned indexes. 

EXPANSION FOR MEETING 
THE NEEDS OF THE FUTURE 

Nursing Center at Oak Summit 

Opening in July, this 170-bed facility provides skilled and 
intermediate care. The center will be one of only a few in the 
state to provide care for ventilator-dependent patients. 



current ER was designed to handle 29,000 patients annuall> . 
but it is handling more than 40,000. Our new ER capacit) 
will be 70,000 annually. This building will also house three 
floors of patient private rooms, our Pharmacy Department, 
and a 35-bed Day Hospital, new kitchen and cafeteria. 

J. Paul Sticht Center on Aging and Rehabilitation 

Construction on this facility begins in November of 1993 and 
is scheduled for completion in January 1996. It will include 
geriatric care, research, and education; psychiatry; and also 
provide comprehensive acute rehabilitation services including 
nutrition assessment, physical, outpatient, speech, and recrea- 
tional therapy. 

BAPTIST BENEVOLENT CARE FUND 
Last year Baptists across our state gave $422,000 to our an- 
nual Mother's Day Offering. All of these monies went toward 
relieving the financial burden of scores of former patients 
who have httle or no health-care insurance and no financial 
means to pay their hospital bills. The churches and individuals 
help make this ministry possible and we are grateful. 

In conclusion, it is readily seen that this healing ministry 
we share together says to our patients and their families: 
"We care about your health-care needs, your spiritual and 
emotional needs, and your financial burdens, and we express 
our caring through service." 



Emergency Department/Dietary 

Under construction at the present time to be completed by 
June 1995, this facility will total 750,000 square feet. Our 

Respectfully submitted. 

Len B. Preslar, Jr. 
President 

The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated 



26 



"Touching Lives With Hope" 



1993 BAPTIST COLLEGE REPORT 



CAMPBELL UNIVERSITY 

Opened as Bules' Creek Academy, January 5, 1887. 
Became Buies' Creek Junior College, August 21, 1926. 
Authorized by Baptist State Convention to become 

Campbell College December 17, 1926. 
Campbell College began a senior college program with 

the junior class in the year 1961. 
School of Law founded in 1976. 
Graduate program in Education launched in 1977; 

Business, 1978. 
Became Campbell University on June 6, 1979. 

School of Business founded in 1983; School of 

Pharmacy and School of Education founded in 1985. 
Norman A. Wiggins, President 

CHOWAN COLLEGE 

Founded and opened for students as Chowan Female 

Institute.October 11, 1848. 
First called Chowan Female Collegiate Institute in 1851. 
First called Chowan Baptist Female Institute in 1868. 
Became Chowan College, May 17, 1910. 
Became coeducational Senior College, 1931. 
Changed to a Junior College, September, 1937. 
Senior College Status Fall, 1992. 
Jerry F. Jackson, President 

GARDNER-WEBB UNIVERSITY 

Chartered first as Boiling Springs High School, 

December 2, 1905. 
Opened as Boiling Springs Junior College, 

September 3, 1928. 
The name was changed and a new charter granted to 

Gardner-Webb Junior College, Inc., June, 1942. 
Charter amended in conformity to the Constitution of the 

N.C. Baptist State Convention, November, 1946. 
Gardner-Webb College became a fully accredited senior 

college December 1, 1971. 
Became Gardner- Webb University on January 1, 1993 

and ojiened School of Divinity, Fall, 1993. 
M. Christopher White, President 

MARS HILL COLLEGE 

First commencement as French Broad Baptist Institute 

July 4, 1856. 
Chartered as Mars Hill College, February 16, 1859. 
Opened as Mars Hill Junior College, August 14, 1922. 
Mars Hill College began a senior college program in 1962. 
Fred B. Bentle\;, President 



1992 COLLEGE DATA 

Total Enrollments: (Regular and Summer School) ... 20,495 Student Financial Aid* 

Graduates 3,789 Federal and State $15,587,89 

Faculty 1,245 Institution Funded 9,039,54 

Administration 1 69 $24,627 ,44 

Church-Related Vocations Students 414 *Wake Forest University not included. 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 

Incorporated as Baptist Female University of N.C, 

February 27, 1891. 
Opened for students, September 27, 1899. 
By legislative enactment became Baptist University for 

Women. January 20, 1905. j 
Became Meredith College by legislative enactment, 

January 24, 1911. 

John E. Weems, President 

WINGATE COLLEGE , 

Authorized as Wingate School of Union Baptist 
Association, 1895; Opened 1896; Chartered 1897. 

Became a junior college in 1923. 

In 1925 the Baptist State Convention of N.C. assumed 
sponsorship; withdrew in 1930 and returned Wingate 
College to support by Union and other associations. 

In 1949 the trustees were first appointed by the Baptist 
State Convention of N.C. 

Became a senior college in 1977. 

Began offering graduate work in 1985. i 

Jerry £. McGee, President 

WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

Opened as Wake Forest Institute, February 3, 1834. 
Chartered as Wake Forest College, Wake Forest, 

December 28, 1838. 
Bowman Gray Medical School of Wake Forest College, 

Winston-Salem, officially opened July 1, 1941; first 

class September 10, 1941. 
Wake Forest College authorized by special session of 

Convention meeting in Greensboro, July 30, 1946 to 

move to Winston-Salem. 
First session in Winston-Salem began with the summer 

term, June 18, 1956; Wake Forest College became a 

university June 12, 1967. 
On November 11, 1986, the Baptist State Convention 

and Wake Forest University established a new relation- 
ship described in the Convention's Constitution, 

Article XIV. 
Thomas K. Heam, Jr., President 



27 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST FOUNDATION, INC. 
ANNUAL REPORT TO BAPTIST ASSOCIATIONS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

June, 1993 

The North Carolina Baptist Foundation works diligently in service to Christ as 
directed by the agency's Mission Statement: 

"The North Carolina Baptist Foundation is an agency of the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina committed under the guidance of the Holy Spirit to 
serving North Carolina Baptists and others in generating an increased awareness of 
Christian estate stewardship principals as a means of financially undergirding 
churches, institutions and mission endeavors on a permanent basis. 

And further, the Baptist Foundation Staff and Board of Directors are 
committed to being scrupulously moral, legal, efficient and accurate in carrying out 
the intent of each donor and trustor whose funds are placed under management of the 
Foundation as a means of sustaining a tangible and perpetual involvement in 
presenting the Gospel, meeting human needs and strengthening all bodies of Christian 
fellowship where Christ is the Head." 

The total market value of the assets of the Foundation at the end of 1992 was 
$41,880,638., an increase of almost S5.6 million over the end of 1991. Typically, assets 
are either held as endowments paying interest income in perpetuity to named Baptist 
causes, or they are held in trust with current income being paid to individuals and 
future income to be paid to Baptist causes in perpetuity. Additionally, the Foundation 
offers fund management for Baptist causes on a revocable basis. 

Earned income distributed and paid 
to Baptist churches, institutions & 

mission causes during fiscal year 1992: SI, 182,203. 

Earned income distributed and paid 
to individuals (with Baptist causes 
named as future beneficiaries) 



In 1992, and continuing into 1993, the Long Range Planning Committee of the 
Board of Directors met extensively to lay the groundwork for the Foundation's goals 
and objectives for the next five years. The previous five years were quite successful 
with ambitious financial goals being met early on. It is anticipated that the Board's 
work in evaluating the past and present status and in laying a road map for the future 
will result in exciting times ahead. 

The staff of the Foundation consists of seven full time employees and two 
persons who provide part-time service in accounting and legal services. The office is 
located in Cary next to the Baptist State Convention building. Visitors are welcome 
and are encouraged to stop by for professional assistance or just to say hello. 



during the fiscal year 1992: 



$1,024,007. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Edwin S. Coates 
Executive Director 



28 



PROCEEDINGS 



The second day of the one hundred and thirty second annual meeting 
of Stony Fork Missionary Association was held on August 7, 1993 at 
Mt. Ephraim. The meeting was conducted in the following manner: 



8:30 Call to Order - Moderator 
8:35 Song 

8:40 Devotion - Burl Jones, Matthew 25: 31-40. 

8:46 Roll Call - Clerk. Bailey's Camp 5, Doe Ridge 3, Laytown 
5, Long Ridge 4, Mt. Ephraim 6, Rock Spring 3, Sandy Flat 
4, Visitor 3, other 1. Total 34. 

8:50 Biblical Recorder - Allison Smith 

8:55 Discipleship Training - Charles Craig. 

9:05 Cooperative Program - Pauline Berry. Speaker Talmadge 

Williams. Support of world missions is our mission. Jesus 
said "all power is given to me in heaven and earth. Go ye 
therefore into all the world". All of us have the 
responsibility to share the gospel with everyone. Missions 
are part of what God wants us to be concerned about. I 
attended Mars Hill College because N. C. Baptist put away 
money to help people like me who could not afford it 
otherwise. 

9:30 Temperance and Morals - Christian Action League - Sharon 

Craig. 
10:00 Break 

10:20 Director of Missions - Will be planning an Evangelism 

Conference but will call it an associational revival this 
year as there was some confusion last year as to what type 
of meeting it was. In 1995 there will be simultaneous 
revivals throughout N. C. involving all the associations and 
hopefully all the churches. 

General Board - George Berry has been elected to this by the 
nominating committee. No report at this time. 

10:30 Stewardship - Roy Gryder - Speaker Talmadge Williams. 

This word has a more profound meaning than we give it. 
The basic meaning is to manage something according to the 
owner's wishes. Stewards of the gospel - we are responsible 
for how we share, tell and live the good news. We are 
stewards of life and of others. Through relationships with 
others we are responsible for spiritual growth. God has 
gifted each of us and we are responsible to Him as to how 
we use those gifts and the possessions He gives us. Giving 
is not an obligation - Jesus said "God loves a cheerful 
giver". If we love God supremely, we will find great joy 
in giving to Him. 

10:45 Resolutions - Betty Woods. 

10:46 Obituaries - Clerk. 

10:48 Election of officers. See attached list. 

11:05 New Business - New York trip. Roy Gryder reported they will 



29 



be leaving in a month going to New Hope Baptist Church in 
Watertown, N. Y, established in 1986. They have the building 
under construction and bricked. The studs are in place, 
wiring and plumbing has been roughed in. Due to resistance 
from inspectors, etc. they have had many stumbling blocks. 
We plan for 10-12 men to go, worship with them on Sun. , and 
begin sheetrock work on Mon. and the other finish work 
needed. We will use the available funds for food and 
travel, would like permission to use this, and make 
available $1, 000 from general fund if needed. Burl Jones 
moved to do this, seconded and approved. 

Budget - moved to accept as presented, seconded and 
approved. 

11:20 Annual Message - Sherrill Dunn. 1 Kings 14: 25-28. There 
is something missing from our denomination, church and 
individual lives, worshiping God. We get caught up in 
denominational, church and personal things and fail to 
worship God. There is a fine line between worldliness and 
worship in the house of God. Many of us are content and 
just do not want to change. Worship should be our delight 
and the high-light of our sabbath day. Worship should also 
be our duty, it is a requirement of God. It also our 
distinction, making us different from the world. 

Rehoboam had turned the glory of God into deadness. What 
kind of worship do you experience? Shishak took away the 
treasure of the house of the Lord and the world has done the 
same thing to our churches today. You can't worship God 
without being changed. Worldliness draws attention away 
from God. There is nothing that can be substituted for 
worship of God, nor will he accept a substitute. Formalism 
fools us into thinking it is worship. I like it when God 
comes in and takes over the service. It is time for us to 
adore God. God is not a spiritual Santa Clause. He can be 
provoked and will bring judgement. We transport our sins 
in and transport them out and wonder why there is no 
revival. There is no revival because there is no repentance 
or renewal. Imitation of worship - Rehoboam was satisfied 
with less than the best. Are we like that? Do we proudly 
parade the imitation of worship: If it looks good in the 
eyes of the people, it is alright but it is not alright. 
Do we passionately protect the imitation of worship? If we 
are going to go back to the way things used to be, lets go 
back to the first New Testament church and do things the way 
they did. We've taken away the gold and settled for the 
brass. We've become too religious for the glory of the 
cross. Lets go back to the pure, uninhibited worship of 
God. 

12:05 Adjourn - Lunch 



LIST OP ASSOCIATIONAL WORKERS ' 


POSITICN- 


NAME AND ADDRESS 


PHONE NO 


^* Director of Missions 


Gecrge Berry, Rt.l/Box 318 /Sugar Grove, N.C. 28679 


704- 

297-1223 


2. Moderator 


Max West, Rt. 1, Box 539, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 


264-2427 


3. Vice-Moderator 


-Ron Burgett/ 2304 Maywood St., Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


726-0816 


4. Treasurer 


Edith Gryder, Rt. 2, Box 182, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 


295-3410 


5. Clerk 


Linda Mills, Rt. 1, Box 596, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 


295-7095 


6. Vacation Bible School 


Barbara West, Rt. 1, Box 539, Blowing Rock, N.C.286C5 


295-2427 ^ 


^* Discipleship Training 


Charles Craig, Rt. 3, Box 730, Boone, N.C. 28607 


963-4120" 


o 

**• stewardship 


Roy Gryder, Rt. 2, Box 182, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 


295-3410 


^' Sunday Schocl Director 


Bonnie Walsh, Rt. 5, Box 315, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


754-5696 


Youth Director 


Pauline Berry, Rt. 1, Box 318, Sugar Grove, N.C. 28679 


297-1223 i 


11. Children's Hoir.'es 


Jeri Triplett, Rt. 10, Bex 642, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


754-4795 


Baptist Hospital 


Edwana Smith, Rt. 5, Box 327, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


757-0617 


13. Retirement Homes 


Mamie Craig, Rt. 3, Box 730, Boone, N.C. 28607 


963-4120 i 


14.Foreign Missions 


John McCoury, Rt. 3, Box 307, Roan Mtn., Tenn. 37687 


615- 
772-3807 


15.Christian Action Leagu 


J Sharon Craig, Rt. 3, Box 730, Boone, N.c. 28607 


963-4120 1 


Horpe Missions 


Vera Dula, Rt. 1, Box 102, Ferguson, N.C. 28624 


758-8982 


17 

"State Missions 


Charles Craig, ^Rtr-57-^ox-322^:rrt^io-i-^' N.C. 28645 


757-0617 


18 

Christian Education 


Debbie Walsh, Rt. 5, Box 306, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


754-1101 


19 

^•Evangelism 


George Berry, Rt. 1, Box 318, Sugar Grove, N.C. 28679 


297-1223 ' 


^^•Cooperative Program 


Pauline Berry, Rt. 1, Box 318, Sugar Grove, N.c. 28679 


297-1223 ; 


21. Song Leader 


Pauline Eldreth, 434 Grand Blvd. Boone, N.C. 28607 


264-2532 \ 


22. WMU Director 


Eunice Luttrell, Rt. 1, Box 650, Blowing Rock, N.C. 2860 


295-7732 


23. Resolutions 


Betty Woods, Rt. 2, Box 43, Ferguson, N.C. 28624 


919- 
97.-^-31 54 


24 

"Biblical Recorder 


Allison Smith, Rt. 5, Box 327, Lenoir, N.C. 28645 


757-0617 


25.Baptist Foundation 


Dale Luttrell, Rt. 1, Box 650, Blowing Rocck, N.C. 28605 


295-7732 



31 



THE BIBLICAL RECORDER 



Associational Report — 1993 

The only thing that is unchangeable is change itself! For most of us it 
is impossible to comprehend the radical and often destructive changes which 
are taking place in our world. In politics, morals, economics and church 
life, our Baptist world is faced with decisions and issues without equal. 

Whatever one's view may be, there is an indispensable need for correct 
and reliable information. The Biblical Recorder was born and continues to 
serve for that purpose. Never was the Recorder more needed than now. 

People are reading less than any time in recent history. It is true of 
secular publications, it is true of wholesome books from respected libraries, 
it is true of religious publications. We live in an electronic age where we 
often think we know the answers to the issues only to discover we do not. 

An informed Baptist is a better Baptist; an uninformed Baptist may be an 
uninvolved or disruptive Baptist. No democracy, including our local 
churches, can survive long without an informed, involved constituency which 
makes decisions based upon accurate information from reliable sources. 

The most important thing facing us at this point is to get the Recorder 
into more Baptist homes than ever before. Your support as a subscriber and 
reader and your encouragement to others will enable the paper to better serve 
the constituency with accurate and helpful information delivered to Baptist 
homes and churches. We need your help! 

In order to save churches large amounts of money and to increase the 
readership of the Recorder , Church News Service (CNS) was launched in 1990. 
This system lets any congregation have their church newsletter incorporated 
into the Biblical Recorder which saves staff time, postage and printing 
costs. Usually, for less than what it costs to produce the church 
newsletter, CNS gives the entire Baptist communication package to each family 
in the congregation. Anticipated increases in mailing costs makes CNS a 
greater value in 1994 than even when it was started in 1990. 

The paper focuses more and more attention on North Carolina Baptists 
with news, features and inspirational articles which will encourage in- 
dividuals and churches in their witness and ministry. One sure way to conquer 
problems and overcome the barriers to effective witness and ministry is to 
have the facts, know the issues and be adequately informed. 

That is why the Recorder was born; that is why it serves today. For 
more information on how your church can subscribe or use CNS, contact: 

The Biblical Recorder 
232 West Millbrook Road 
Raleigh, NC 27609 
(919) 8A7-2127 



32 



ISCIPLESHIP 
TRAINING 



Discipleship Training is an appropriate name for the work to which God has called you and 
me. Being a disciple has been the purpose and goal of every follower of Jesus Christ since 
our Lord began calling disciples two thousand years ago. For a century, under a variety of 
names, the work of training disciples has continued. Today, the need is obvious and the disci- 
pleship challenge is great. 

If churches are going to be New Testament churches, training disciples is not an option. It is a 
scriptural requirement for Christians and for the church. - " 

Discipleship Training is a verb more than it is a noun. It is more what we do as followers of 
Jesus than something we have. Discipleship Training is a Christ-like action more than it is an 
organization or a program. 

Every problem in the church and every concern Christians face is a discipleship issue. To train 
disciples is to equip them to live a powerful Christian life. To fail to train disciples is to ignore 
the command and model of our Lord; to neglect the Church of Jesus Christ; and to allow Chris- 
tians to face life spiritually unprepared. 

All Christians need Discipleship Training. All churches need Discipleship Training. The world 
needs trained disciples. 

This part of the church's work has had a variety of names. But the name Discipleship Training 
reveals and proclaims it's work. Let there be no misunderstanding — we are in the business of 
training disciples. 

Discipleship Training is the best way to make disciples. Making disciples is the best way to 
change the world. : , 

Stony Fork Associational "M" Night 1992 was held at Bailey's Camp on Saturday, 
Oct. 3. Five churches were represented including 4 visitors and 3 pastors / 
total attendance of 32. 

The Associational Traning team (ADTT) attended the state conference at 
Camp Caraway on August 27th and 28th of this year. The team included: Charles 
Craig, Director, Edith Gryder, Adults, Pauline Berry, Youth, Mamie Craig, 
Children and Linda Mills, Preschool. If we can be of any assistance in starting 
Discipleship Training at church or help one already established, we are available 
to help in any way we can. 

Charles Craig 



33 



COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 



Today/ Southern Baptist working together are doing God's work through the Cooperative 
Program. 

Voluntary cooperation has been a major factor in the growth of the Southern 
Baptist Convention from 4,100 churches with 352/000 members in 1845 to more 
than 38/000 churches and 15,000,000 members in 1993 

Gifts through the Cooperative Program plan of doing God's work supports some 
9,000 missionaries and thousands of ministries nationally and internationally. 
We support educational institutions, children's homes / homes for the elderly 
and hospitals: we broadcast the gospel on radio and television- We publish 
state papers/ church literature and books. We minister through home and foreign 
mission fields. 

Every time we give to our church and our church sends a portion of our gifts 
through the Cooperative Program/ we participate in what God is doing through 
out Baptist State convention/ in our nation/ and around the world. 



Pauline Berry 



34 



CHRISTIAN ACTION LEAGUE of north Carolina, ini 

POST OFFICE BOX 2126 - RALEIGH. NORTH CAROLINA 27602 



REPORT TO THE ASSOCIATIONS 
1993 



Do you believe in miracles? They still occur, and we 
experienced one in the 1993 session of the N.C. General 
Assembly. No gambling legislation was enacted during that 
legislative session. . 

When the legislators came to Raleigh on January 27, 
1993, veteran legislature observers admitted that this was 
the year for a state-operated lottery bill to get out of the 
General Assembly. Both Governor James B. Hunt and Lt. 
Governor Dennis Wicker, both former lottery opponents, had 
endorsed the proposed lottery legislation. Furthermore, 
there were 42 new House members, and a large majority of them 
had campaigned supporting the lottery. Out of the key 
elected state officials, gambling opponents had only one 
friend. House Speaker Dan Blue, and he made no apologies 
about his oppo&ition to state-sponsored gambling. 

What happened? Concerned Christians began to speak up 
and contacted their legislators. By the time. Senate Bill 
11, The State Lottery Act, had passed the Senate by a vote of 
27-23, House members who had campaigned supporting lottery 
legislation began contacting members of the House Committee 
on Constitutional Amendments and Referenda to keep the bill 
in committee. i 

In the meantime, some 20 workshops were conducted i 
throughout the state educating and motivating the Christian 
community about this insidious evil under the sponsorship of 
the League, N.C. Baptist Men, Woman's Missionary Union, the 
Council on Christian Life and Public Affairs, and the N.C. 
Christian Coalition. Resource leaders included Dr. Norman 
Geisler, author, GAMBLING A BAD BET; Dr. Patrick Anderson, 
Professor of Criminology, Florida Southern College; Dr. Paul 
Jones, Executive Director, Mississippi Christian Action 
CoTTunis^icn; Bill Brooks, Executive Director, CITIZENS AGAINST 
THE LOTTERY; from the Baptist State Convention, Doug Cole, • 
Executive Director, Christian Life Council; along with George i 
Reed, Director of Christian Citizenship; and members of i 
Gamblers Anonymous . 

In the closing days of the legislative session. Rep. ^ 
David Redwine, ( D-Brunswick ) , who has introduced lottery 
legislation for the past 10 years, requested that the bill be 
held over until the 1994 session. 

Of course, this will give the $300 billion gambling 
industry some 10 months to re-group their supporters. Also 
it will give concerned Christians the time to get their 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION "TOMORROW 
AFRUATED WITH THE AMERICAN COUNCIL ON ALCOHOL PROBLEMS 



35 



message to lawmakers that gambling is bad public policy, and 
such legislation ought to be defeated. 

There is also a pari-mutuel gambling proposal (horse 
racing with off-track betting parlors) before the General 
Assembly. The Senate Bill has already passed a Senate 
Committee and is currently in the Senate Finance Committee. 
The House Bill has also passed a House Committee and is 
currently in the House Appropriations Committee. Both bills 
are eligible for the 1994 session. 

Someone has said: "The only lesson we learn from history 
is that we don't learn from history." North Carolina had an 
experience with pari-mutuel gambling with dog tracks in 
Currituck and Carteret Counties in the early 1950 's. The 
N.C. Supreme Court closed them down as being a public 
nuisance . 

Fexhaps there is no industry that is "riddled" with 
corruption as much as the gambling industry. Last year we 
had legislators indicted in S.C. for accepting bribes from 
gambling lobbyists. Some 10 public officials have pled 
quilty to corruption charges in Kentucky over a gambling 

scam , and 12 others are under investigation. In Arizona, 
legislators have gone to prison due to a gambling scandal. We 
have had Governors from West Virginia and from Maryland to go 
to prison due to gambling scandals in their respective 
states. Wherever you have legalized gambling, undoubtedly, 
you will find corruption in government. 

This is why it is urgent for committed Christians to 
contact their legislators and urge them to oppose any 
gambling proposals. 

DRUNK DRIVING: When you deal with politicians, tenacity 
is a key. For ten years, we have sought legislation that 
would establish .08 breathalyzer reading as the standard for 
drunk driving in North Carolina. In the past, we were able 
to get such legislation through the House, but the Senate was 
the graveyard. The measure would always be referred to a 
hostile Senate Committee composed largely of trial lawyers, 
and that would be "death" to such a proposal. 

V7ith a change in Senate leadership, the .05 breathalyzer 
legislation will become law on October 1, 1993, which will be 
a useful tool in helping to remove drunk drivers from the 
highways. 

The League continues to assist local communities in 
combating our No. 1 drug problem, alcohol. Let us know if a 
liquor referendum is to be held in your area, and we will be 
ready to help. 

Thank you for standing with us in the cause of Applied 
Christianity through your prayer and financial support. 

Sincerely , 



Joe S . Lennon , 
President 



Coy C. Privette, 
Executive Director 



STENAEOISHIP REPORT 



STEWARDSHIP. We use the word a lot/ but have we stopped to carefully examine 
the meaning of stewardship. After sOTie thought/ I have come to realize that 
this/ like so many terms is relative and can mean many different things to differen 
people. Some heeir the work and think only of the idea of burdensome giving, 
while others may consider good stewardshiop as actions that lead only to gain 
for themselves. 

Neither of these concepts can be true for Christian people. Since we do not 
accpet these/ let me offer a definition that seems to me to fit our ideas better. 
I submit that Christian stewardship is, and must be, the using of the talents 
and material goods that God has entnasted us to bring the greater glory to His 
name. If we accept this challenge/ then we here today have the awesone responsibilit 
of using not only that which has been bestowed on us as individuals/ but also 
that placed in our caire by those in our churches as well. Our people have trusted 
us with the funds that they contribute to boldy and wisely use them to the glory 
of God. 

As we consider the proposed budget cind requests for funds, we must assure ourselves 
that no hint of waste is allowed to creep in. But we must be equally vigilant 
not to hesitate to act when action is needed. Having so dealt/ we can go back 
to the people in our churches and confidently report to them that their offerings 
are being faithfully used. 

No only have our churches entrusted us with their funds, but they have given 

us a clear indication of their wishes as to how they want their funds used. 

For the last three years / our mission giving, as a percentage of our total receipts, 

has increased at about 1.0% per year. The question comes to mind, are we leading 

the churches or are the churches leading us? Whichever is true, we can only 

praise God for mission-minded people and their desire to tell others about Jesus, 

for there is no greater goal. 



Roy Gryder 



37 



OBITOARIBS 

Special Recognition (Boone Fork) - Mrs. Maggie Ecirp, Mrs. Pearl Daye Hatten 
Doe Ridge - Mr. Boyd Lunceford 

Laytown - Mrs. Rosetta Dula - former Song Leader 
Long Ridge - Mrs. Coileen Thompson/ Mrs. Margaret Webb 
Mt. Ephraim - Mr. Virgil Cox, Mrs. Pearl Triplett 

BESOLunans 

Let it be so resolved that Stony Fork Association expresses its appreciation 
to Long Ridge and Mt. Ephraim churches for their hospitality and good food. 

We also appreciate the Christian fellowship and the excellent reports and speakers 
that we have heard this yeeir. 

Betty Woods 



38 



PROPOSED BUDGET FOR STONY FORK ASSOCIATION 

1993-1994 



Director of Missions S3, 000. 00 

Annuity - Director of Missions 624. 00 

Cler ical-Misc 50. 00 

Clerk Honorarium 250. 00 

Treasurer Honorarium 250. 00 

Vacation Bible School 200.00 

Phone 100. 00 

Discipleship Training 150. 00 

Evangelism 125. 00 

WMU Expenses 150.00 

Associational Retreats 250. 00 

TOTAL $5, 349. 00 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



40 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE ' 

I' 



Year 


Churches 


Moderator 


Clerk 


Preacher 


1862 


Zions Calc Meeting 










House, Wilkes Co. 


Larkin Hodges 


Larkin Pipes 


Elder Larkin Hodf 


1863 


Yellow Hill 


Larkin Hodges 


Larkin Pipes 


Wilson Bradshaw 


1864 


Minutes were not printed, manuscript got lost. 






1865 


Mt. Ephriam 


Larkin Hodges 


|. R. Hodges 


loseph Harrison 


1866 


South Kork 


Larkin Hodges 


Elijah Trivett 


Larkin Hodges 


1867 


Watauga 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


|. R. Carlton 


1868 


Union 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


lames Parsons 


1869 


Stony l-orl. 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


W. H. Phillips 


1870 


Old Meld 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


William Wilcox 


1871 


Elk 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


lames Parsons 


1872 


Mt. Vernon 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


|. R. Carlton 


1873 


Watauga 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


Larkin Hodges 


1874 


Yellow Hill 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


james Parsons 


1875 


Laurel Fork 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


Levi Wilson 


1876 


Stony Fork 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


Larkin Hodges 


1877 


Poplar Grove 


Larkin Hodges 


Elijah Trivett 


james Parsons 


1878 


Old Field 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


|. R. Carlton 


1879 


Elk 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


Monroe Gragg 


1880 


Mt. Vernon 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


Monroe Gragg 


1881 


Watauga 


Larkin Hodges 


Elijah Trivett 


Levi Wilson 


1882 


Mt. Ephriam 


J. F. Eller 


John R. Hodges 


lames Parsons 


1883 


Y How Hill 


I.F.EIIer 


Elijah Trivett 


Larkin Hodges 


1884 


Boones Fork 


Larkin Hodges 


Thomas Pipes 


Larkin Pipes 


1885 


Buffalo Cove 


). F. Eller 


Thomas Pipes 


j. F. Eller 


1886 


Stony Fork 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


E. M. Gragg 


1887 


Union 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


David Eller 


1888 


Laurel Fork 


lames Parsons 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M.Lee 


1889 


Poplar Grove 


F.M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


|ohn F. Eller 


1890 


Mt. Vernon 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


E. M. Gragg 


189V. 


Watauga 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1892 


Mt. Paran 


E.M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


E. M. Gragg 


1893 


Boones Fork 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


S.T.Carroll 


1894 


Yellow Hill 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


lohn F. Eller 


1895 


New River 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


Geo. W. Trivett 


1896 


Elk 


E.M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1897 


Laurel Fork 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1898 


Buffalo Cove 


). C. Miller 


Wm. M. Lee 


). F. Davis 


1899 


Mt. Vernon 


E. M. Gragg 


R. H. Pipes 


1 . |. 1. Sherwood 


1900 


Watauga 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


D. C. Harman 


1901 


Stony Fork 


I.e. Miller 


Wm. M.Lee 


|ohn Crisp 


1902 


Poplar Grove 


I.C.Miller 


A. |. Shull 


|. C. Blaylock 


1903 


Boones Fork 


F. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1904 


Mt. Ephriam 


F. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


F. M. Gragg 


1905 


Mt. Paran 


E.M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1906 


Yellow Hill 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


Asa Brown 


1907 


New River 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


|. F. Davis 


1908 


Middle Cane 


lames F . Church 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1909 


Elk 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1910 


Laurel Fork 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1911 


Mt. Vernon 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


D. M. Wheeler 


1912 


Poplar Grove 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M.Lee 


R. F. Wilcox 


1913 


Watauga 


Thos. L. Day 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1914 


Mt. Ephriam 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1915 


Boones Fork 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


D. M. Wheeler 


1916 


Rock Springs 


B. F. Wilcox 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1917 


Mt. Paran 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1918 


Due to the outbreak ot in 


luenza no Association was held. 






1919 


Yellow Hill 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. 5. Hampton 


B.F.Wilcox 


1920 


Mt. VernoD 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1921 


Laurel Fork 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


D. M. Wheeler 


1922 


Watauga 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


Oscar Dellinger 


1923 


Poplar Grove 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1924 


Boones Fork 


B. F. Wilcox 


1 . Amos Hampton 


W. D. Ashley 


1925 


Mt. Ephriam 


B. F. Wilcox 


1 . Amos Hampton 


j. A. Hampton 


1926 


Rock View 


D. M. Wheeler 


1 . Amos Hampton 


G. M. Watson 



41 



» 



1927 


Elk 


D. M. Wheeler 


R. F. Wilcox 


A. C. Hambv 


1928 


Watauga 


D. M. Wheeler 


B. F. Wilcox 


B. F. Wilcox 


1929 


Sandy Flat 


D. M. Wheeler 


B. F. Wilcox 


G. M. Waison 


1930 


Middle Cane 


W. D. Ashley 


B. F. Wilcox 


Linney Barnes 


1931 


Laurel Fork 


W. D. Ashley 


B. F. Wilcox 


B. F. Wilcox 


1932 


New Hopewell 


G. M. Watson 


B.F. Wilcox 


I . T. McGuire 


1933 


Yellow Hill 


B. F. Wilcox 


Roy Keller 


G. M. Watson 


1934 


Mt. Vernon 


G. W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


R. H. Shore 


1935 


Grandmother Gap 


G. W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


W. J . Cook 


1936 


Mt. Ephriam 


G. W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


Carl Triplett 


1937 


Mt. View 


B. F. Wilcox 


G. M. Watson 


Raymond Hendrix 


1938 


Watauga 


Carl Triplett 


F . L. Hampton 


W. D. Ashley 


1939 


Laurel Fork 


Carl Triplett 


F. L. Hampton 


W. J. Cook 


1940 


Bailey Camp 


Carl Triplett 


F. L. Hampton 


G. M. Watson 


1941 


Sandy Flat 


Lee J . Church 


N. L. Harrison 


Roy Keller 


1942 


New Hopewell 


Lee J. Church 


N. L. Harrison 


B. F. Wilcox 


1943 


Boones Fork 


Lee ) . Church 


N. L. Harrison 


W. B. Bryant 


1944 


Watauga 


N. L. Harrison 


W. M. Brown 


Frank Knight 


1945 


Laytown 


N. L. Harrison 


W. M. Brown 


W. D. Ashley 


1946 


Mt. Vernon 


G. M. Watson 


W. M. Brown 


W. D. Ashley 


1947 


Yellow Hill 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Watson 


Roscoe Greene 


1948 


No Minutes, Manuscript lost at printers. Held with Doe Ridge Church. 




1949 


Mt. Paran 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Watson 


Roscoe Greene 


1950 


Rock Springs 


Theo Hendrix 


N. L. Harrison 


R. L. Barnes 


1951 


New Hopewell 


Theo Hendrix 


N. L. Harrison 


Barney Oliver 


1952 


Boones Fork 


G. M. Watson 


J. Merritt Coffey 


W. J. Cook 


1953 


East Flats 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Watson 


R. L. Barnes 


1954 


Mt. Ephriam 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Watson 


Lloyd J. Duller 


1955 


Bailey Camp 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Watson 


W. |. Cook 


1956 


Laurel Fork 


Theo Hendrix 


J. Merritt Coffey 


W. M. Brown 


1957 


Mt. Vernon and 










Sandy Flat 


Theo Hendrix 


J. Merritt Coffey 


W. J.Cook 


1958 


Laytown and 










Rock Springs 


Theo Hendrix 


). Merritt Coffey 


Carson Eggers 


1959 


New Hopewell and 










Long Ridge 


Carson Eggers 


J . Merritt Cotfcy 


W. J. Cook 


1960 


Mt. Paran and 










Boones Fork 


Carson Eggers 


J . Merritt Coffey 


Wendell Critcher 


1961 


Watauga and 










Yellow Hill 


Carson Eggers 


J. Merrill Coffey 


Dupree Gowan 


1962 


Mt. Ephriam and 










Sandy Flat 


Carson Eggers 


Miss Winifred Hampton 


Roby McNeil 


1963 


Doe Ridge and 










Rock Springs 


Carson Eggers 


Miss Winifred Hampton 


W. M. Brown 


1964 


Bailey's Camp 


E. 0. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Wm. Quinn 




Boones Fork 


E. O. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 




1965 


Laurel Fork 


E. O. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Stone 


W. M. Brown 




Laytown 


E. 0. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 




1966 


Longridge 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Phillip Martin 




Mt. Paran 


A . C. Moody 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Lyie (Pete) Vanno 


1967 


Mt. Vernon 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Basil Tester 




New Hopewell 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


E. O. Bustle 


1968 


Rock Springs 


A. C. Moody 


Mrs. Clark Slorie 


A. C. Moody 




Sandy Flat 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Rayner Maiheson 


1969 


Baileys Camp 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Lewis Hodge 




Boones Fork 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs. Clark Sione 


Herring Crisp 


1970 


Laurel Fork 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Max West 


David Austin 




Doe Ridge 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Max West 


Archie Clawson 


1971 


Laytown 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Raymond Turbyfi 




Longridge 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Sherrill Welborn 


1972 


Mt. Ephriam 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Gurney Robbins 




Mount Paran 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


A. C. Moody 


1973 


Mt. Vernon 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Everette Watson 




New 1 lope well 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Sherrill Welborn 


1974 


Rock Springs 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Merle Johnson 




Sandy Flat 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Dale Milstead 


1975 


Yellow Hill 


Merle Johnson 


Mrs. Max West 


Dean Hodges 




Bailey's Camp 


Merle Johnson 


Mrs. Max West 


Max West 


1976 


Boones Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


A. C. Moody 




Doe Ridge 






Lloyd Hollman 


1977 


Laurel Fork 


Charles Craig 


. Barbara West 


Raymond Hendri> 




Laytown 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Max West 



42 



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Sherrill Dunn 



The churches/ Buffalo Cove, Cool Springs, Wilkes County Elk, Stony Fork, and Yellow 
Hill, formerly belonging to other associations. 

Met at the Stony Fork Baptist Church and organized the Stony Fork Baptist Association 
on November 9th. and 10th. , 1880. For this meeting appointed Elder Larkin Hodges, 
Moderator and Brother Elijah Trivette, Clerk. 



43 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 



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TASL E 1 SPECIAL INFORMATION 


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/ 



I 



HOWARD 
CREEK RD. 



DOE RIDGEI 



BOONE 



SEVEN 
DEVILS 



AVERY CO. 



SANDY FLATI 



BOONE FORKB 



227 



blowing! 

ROCK 



22/ 



73 



NEW HOPEWELL 
1517 



LONGRIDGE 



GRAGG 



6> 



GLOBE 

'3. 



^0 



stony Fork Missionary Baptist Association Churches 




TO 
NORTH 
WILKESBORO 
— ■ 421 



WILKES CO. 



BAILEYS 
CAMP ■ 



1500 



BAILEYS 
CAMP 



ROCK SPRING 



'4- 



CALDWELL CO. 



LAYTOWN I 



BUFFALO COVE RD. 



268 



26» 



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1994 ANNUAL 




STONY FORK 
MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

NORTH CAROLINA 



1994 
MINUTES 
OF THE 
STONY FORK MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION 

HELD WITH 
ROCK SPRING, AUGUST 12, 1994 
AND 

SANDY FLAT, AUGUST 13, 1994 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Associational Leaders 1 

Suggested Order of Business 2 

Constitution/Bylaws 3 

Proceedings 11 

Proposed Budget 19 

Home Missions 20 

Home Mission Board 21 

Foreign Missions 23 

Financial Report 25 

Vacation Bible School 26 

Biblical Recorder 27 

Retirement Homes 29 

Hospital 30 

Christian Higher Education 32 

Baptist Foundation 33 

Cooperative Program 34 

State Missions 35 

Children's Homes 37 

Woman's Missionary Union 38 

Discipleship Training 40 

Christian Action League 41 

Stewardship 42 

Resolutions 43 

Obituaries/Messengers to Association 44 

History and Historical Table 45 

Tables 



FHEnN BAPTIST CON^^ENT'ON 

jOCIATlONAL LEADERS - 1994 



Please provide the upcoming name (new church year), mailing address, and telephone number of the tollowlng positions in your association. If th« positlon(s) listed 
IS not the exact title used by your association, change the title !o conform to 'he name o( the position used by your association. 



POSITION 


NAME 


MAILING ADDRESS. CITY, AND ZIP CODE 


PHONE NO. 


) r. of Assoc Missions 
] Full-Time S Part-Time 


! 

George Berry 


Rt. L, Box 318, Sugar Grove, N.C.28679 


--- 


297-1223 


^ssoc. Office Secretary 
] Full-Time □ Part-Time 










eligious Educ or 
hurch Dev. Dir. 

1 Ci 1 1 1 Ti ^r^ a f""* P a r+ T i m o 

J rUli~ I iiTic L_j r an- i iino 










;St^ Director 

] Full-Time □ Part-Time 










)ther Paid Staff (Specify) 
1 Full-Time □ Part-Time 






f 




)ther Paid Staff (Specify) 
] Full-Time □ Part-Time 






5 




/loderator 


Ron Burgett 


2304 Maywood St., Lenoir, N.C. 28645 




726-0816 


'Ice Moderator 


John McCourey 


Rt . 3, Box 307, ROAN MtN. Tenn. 3/ bo/ 




f^ 1 A-7 79_1S 


:ierk 


Linda Mills 


Rt. 1, Box 596, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 




295-7095 


'reasurer 


Edith Gryder 


Rt. 2, Box 182, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 




295-34 10 


'astoral Ministries Dir 










Sunday School Dir 


Bonnie Walsh 


Rt. 5, Box 315, Lenoir, N.C, 28645 




754-5696 


)iscipieship Training 


Charles Craig 


Rt. 3, Box 730, Boone, N.C. 28607 






/lusic Ministry Dir. 


Pauline Eldreth 


567 Grand Blvd, Boo^e, N.C. 28607 




264-2532 


Jrotfierhood Dir 










VMU Dir 


Linda Mills 


Rt. 1, Box 596, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 




295-7095 


ivangelism Dir 


George Berry 


Rt. 1, Box 318, Sugar Grove, N.C. 2867^ 


1 


297-1223 


Stewardship Dir 


Roy Gryder 


Rt. 2, Box 182, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 




295-3410 


i^issions Development Dir 










^edia Library Dir 










Recreation Dir 










-amily Ministry Dir 










christian Life Dir 
or Committee Chm ) 










jeminary Extension Dir 










Student Ministries Dir. 
or Committee Chm ) 










\dministrative 
3omm Chm 










communications 
2omm. Chm 










-inance Comm Chm 


Edith Gryder 


Rt. 2, Box 182, Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 




295-34 10 


History Comm Chm 










Nominating 
Oomm, Chr 


Max West 


Rt. 1, Box 539, Blowing Rock, N.C. 2860: 


i 




Strategy Comm Chm 









































North Carolina 



Association 



Stony Fork 



295-7095 



70^ 



NEXT 
VNNUAL 
1EETING 



Location (Churches or Places) 
Bailey's Camp and Doe Ridge 



opening 0:ve 

8-11-95 



Time ot Opening Session 
X Morning Atter.-ioon 



Closing Date 
-Even.rg 8-12-95 



Time of Closing Session 

Xl Morning □ Afternoon C Evening 



■ f 

; 't 



SUGGESTED ORDER OF BUSINESS FXDR 1995 
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY FOURTH 
ANNUAL MEETING OF STONY PORK 
MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 11, 1995 
BAILEY'S CAMP 



8:30 Call to Order Moderator 

8:35 Song Song Leader 

8:40 Devotion Pastor of Host Church 

8:50 Adoption of Program Moderator 

9:00 Roll Call Clerk 

9:05 Recognition of New Pastors & Workers Moderator 

9:10 Vacation Bible School Barbara West 

9:15 Foreign Missions John McCoury 

9:25 Sunday School Bonnie Walsh 

9:30 Cooperative Program Pauline Berry 

9:40 Evangelism George Berry 

9:50 Finance Report - Budget Edith Gryder 

10:00 Break 

10:10 Home Missions Vera Dula 

10:25 State Missions Charles Smith 

10:40 Childrens Homes Jeri Triplett 

10:55 Retirement Homes Mamie Craig 

11:10 Baptist Hospital Edwana Smith 

11:25 Christian Higher Education Debbie Walsh 

11:40 Baptist Foundation Dale Luttrell 

11:53 Stewardship Speaker 

12:10 Annual Message Speaker 

1:00 Adjourn-Lunch 

SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 12, 1995 
DOE RIDGE 

8:30 Call to Order Moderator 

8:35 Song Song Leader 

8:40 Devotion Pastor of Host Church 

8:50 Roll Call Clerk 

8:55 Biblical Recorder Allison Smith 

9:05 Discipleship Training Charles Craig 

9:15 W.M.U Linda Mills 

9:25 Temperance & Morals-CAL Rick Turbyfill 

9:50 General Board Report George Berry 

9:55 Stewardship Report Roy Gryder 

10:00 Break 

10:10 Resolutions Betty Woods 

10:15 Obituaries Clerk 

10:20 Business 

Election of Officers 

Approve Budget 

11:00 Annual Message Speaker 

12:00 Adjourn-Lunch 



-2- 



CONSTITUTION 



OF THE STONY FOE^^ MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PREAMBLE 

For the declaration of its fundamental purposes and the permanent guidance 
and control of its activities/ the body does adopt the following as its constitution/ 
to wit: 

ARTICLE I - Name and Mentoership 

Section 1. This body shall be Icnown as the Stony Fork Missionary Baptist 
Association of North Carolina. 

Section 2. The Association is composed of Missionary Baptist Churches. 

Section 3. Any Baptist Church may be admitted into this Association upon 
recommendation of the Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitution of 
the Churches Committee and the majority vote of members present at any meeting 
as prescribed in Article IX. 

Section 4. Any Church at her discretion/ may withdraw from this body. 

Section 5. This association may, at any meeting/ after an investigation 
and report of a duly authorized committee of the Association/ by an majority 
vote/ declare a dissolution of union with any church deemed corrupt/ either 
in doctrine or practice. 

Section 6. Each church shall elect its messengers to the Annual Associational 
meeting. Each messenger must be certified in the annual church letter to the 
Association and must be appointed on the following ratio: Five messengers/ 
in addition to the pastor/ for each church having a membership not exceeding 
fifty/ and one additional messenger for each increase of fifty. In no case 
shall the total number of messengers exceed ten for any given church/ in addition 
to the pastor. 

Section 7. When any church shall fail to be represented by letter or 
messenger for two consecutive years / the Missions Committee shall confer with 
the church/ and if satisfactory reason is not given/ and there is no evidence 
that said church wishes to keep alive their affiliation with the Association/ 
the committee shall bring its findings to the next Executive Committee Meeting/ 
the Association shall/ at that time/ by a majority of present members/ vote 
to withdraw fellowship. The Association recognizes the right of any affiliated 
church to withdraw its fellowship from the Association. 

Section 8. The Annual Associational meeting shall convene on Friday at 
8:30 a.m. and adjourn at 1:00 p.m. (lunch to follow). It shall reconvene 
at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday and adjourn at the completion of business for the 
noon meal. This following the first Sunday in August. 

ARTICLE II - Purpose 

Section 1. The prime purpose of the Association shall be to counsel together 
for the enlargement and strengthening of God's kingdom and to promote unity 
and growth among the churches composing it. 

Section 2. It shall be the purpose of this Association to enlist all 
of the churches into full cooperation with the North Carolina Baptist State 
Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention and their agencies in the work 
of missions/ evangelism/ christian education and social service. 

ARTICLE III - Powers and Perogatives 
Section 1. The association/ when covened in meeting/ shall sit as an 
advisory council and shall have no power to infringe on any of the internal 



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rights and affairrs of the member churches. It may advise/ however/ with the 
member churches and recommend measures of usefulness for their adoption or 
rejection. 

Section 2. When grievances occur between any members or minority group 
of any church which is a member of the Association/ the Association/ the Executive 
Coramitttee/ or Missins Committee/ or the committee designated by and acting 
for either of these bodies/ may advise or give aid in matters which do not 
infringe on the rights of the local church/ and this only on the invitation 
of the individual or group involved. 

Section 3. Any church found unfaithful to the faith and practices common 
to the Association/ as outlined in Addendum I - ARTICLES OF FAITH (The Baptist 
Faith and Message as adopted by the Southern Baptist Convention in 1963) shall 
be encouraged to correct such errors. If the conduct of said church is not 
corrected and is of such nature as to alienate said church from the orderly 
and faithful churches of the Association/ the Executive Committee of the Association 
can recommend that fellowship be withdrawn from said church/ and upon a majority 
vote of the messengers in an Annual session/ fellowship with such church can 
be withdrawn. (See Article 1/ Section 7). 

ARTICLE IV - The Executive Committee 

Section 1. The Association shall have an Executive Committee to serve 
as the Association between Annual Meetings/ assisting in the overall work of 
the Association with such limitations as may be irrposed by the constitution. 

Section 2. The Executive Committee shall be composed of the associational 
officers and the Pastors / and the Chairman of Deacons / along with two elected 
lay persons from each church. Sixteen members shall constitute a quorum. 
The names of these persons shall be furnished annually to the associational 
clerk/ if changes occur during the associational year/ these changes shall 
be forwarded to the Clerk. 

Section 3. At the beginning of each Executive Committee Meeting/ a roll 
call will be taken of each church and its representatives. 

Section 4. The Executive Comnittee shall meet within two weeks after 
the Annual Associational Meeting/ the second Sunday of November/ March/ and 
July. These meetings shall be held in churches of the Association/ consecutively/ 
in alphabetical order. 

ARTICLE V - Officers 

Section 1. The officers of this body shall be: Moderator/ Vice-Moderator/ 
Clerk, Treasurer/ Sunday School Directory/ Church Training Directory/ Brotherhood 
Director, W.M.U. Directory/ Vacation Bible School Directory/ Music Director, 
Pianist/ Evangelism Director and Youth Coordinator. 

Section 2. The officers of the Association shall be elected at each regular 
Annual Associational Meeting. The Nominating committee shall fill vacancies 
that may occur in their respective categories between annual meetings of the 
Association by bringing names to the Executive Comm.ittee for their approval. ; 

Section 3. By the virtue of the office, the Associational Director of 
Missions is considered an ex-officio member of all Associational Committees. 
For all qualifications and terms of office see Article VII, Section 1. 

ARTICLE VI - Duties of Officers 
Section 1. It shall be the duty of the Moderator of the Association to 
preside over the Annual Sessions, and at the quarterly meetings of the Executive 
Committee. As the presiding officer, he shall open the meetings punctually 
as the appointed time, enforce the rules, preserve order, and exercise all 
the perogatives of a presiding officer according to the principles of established 
parlimentary usage. He shall provide leadership for a progressive ideal throughout 



the Association. He shall be elected for a one year term, and he shall not 

succeed himself for a maximum of two full terms. He shall appoint in advance 

any other committees he may deem necessary or advisable. Each of these committees 

shall report at the Annual Meeting for which they are appointed. It shall 

be the responsibility of the Moderator to call any needed meetings at any 

time he deems necessary. The moderator is considered an ex-officio member 

of all committees. 

Section 2. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to discharge 
the duties of the Moderator in his absence or as his request. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep an accurate record 
of the proceedings of the Association in regular and special sessions; to 
keep accurate records of quarterly meetings of the Executive Committee; to 
keep on file the printed minutes and other important documents belonging 
to the Association; to furnish the churches with blank letter forms on which 
to make the annual reports to the Association; to superintend the printing 
of the minutes / and to distribute them to the churches as soon after adjournment 
as possible. For this service the clerk shall be paid annually an amount 
recommended by the Finance Committee and approved by the Association. 

Section 4. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive all funds 
of the Association and to disburse the same in accordance with the budget 
of the Association or for the purposes for which the funds were contributed. 
To render to the Association an itemized report of the receipts and disbursements 
at the first session of the Annual Meeting. In the treasurer's absence/ 
a member of the Finance Committee shall give the report. The Treasurer shall 
make available through the associational newsletter a quarterly report including 
the contributions of each church in the Association. A quarterly report 
shall be made available at the quarterly meetings of the Executive Committee. 
For this service, the Treasurer shall be paid annually an amount recommended 
by the Finance Committee and approved by the Association. 

Section 5. The Sunday School Director shall take the initiative in 
promoting inspirational meetings/ study courses/ and leadership classes for 
the churches of the Association. He shall work in cooperation with the 
denominational Sunday school Agencies in promoting the denominational programs; 
and he will be responsible for coordinating and promoting Vacation Bible 
school work in conjunction with the Vacation Bible School Director. He shall 
also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 6. The Discipleship Training Director shall take the initiative 
in promoting the regular meetings projected by the State Convention and be 
available to the churches for help in strengthening the established mions 
and encourage the organization of new unions in churches without them. He 
shall also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for 
his organization. 

Section 7. The Brotherhood Director shall be responsible for promoting 
missionary education within our Association and be available to the churches 
to assist in strengthening organizations and programs of existing units. 
He shall also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership 
for his organization. 

Section 8. The WMU Director shall be responsible for promoting missionary 
education within our Association and she shall be available in the churches 
to assist in promoting and establishing new Baptist Women and Baptist Women 
Auxiliary units / and shall assist in strengthening the organizations and 
programs of existing units. She shall also work with the Nominating Committee 
in enlisting leadership for her organization. 

Section 9. The Vacation Bible School Director shall work in conjunction 
with the Sunday School Director in enlisting and training workers/ planning 



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and organizing for the annual Vacation Bible School Clinic. 

Section 10. The Music Director shall tcke the initiative in promoting 
the meetings and activities suggested by the state music leadership and be 
available to the churches to help in strengthening their music programs. 
The Music Director will also be responsible for the music at the associatinal 
and Executive Committee meetings. He shall also work with the Nominating 
Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 11. The Pianist will be responsible for playing the piano at 
all associational and Executive Committee meetings. 

Section 12. The Evangelism Chairman will work with the Evangelism program 
in planning, promoting, and coordinating all evangelistic activities for 
the Association in conjunction with the Director of Missions. 

ARTICLE VII - Director of Missions 
Statement of Purpose and Position Title: 

The office or position will be known as the Director of Missions for the 
Stony Fork Missionary Baptist Association. The Director of Missiois shall 
provide responsible leadership in the work of the Association through performing 
such basic functions as the planning, correlation, and implementation of 
programs of programs, program services, and ministries of the Association; 
counsel the churches; agencies of needs, problems, and potentialities, with 
the the Association; and interpret to the churches the program resources 
and other assistance available from the Baptist State Convention and Southern 
Baptist Convention agencies. 

Section 1. RESPONSIBILITIES 

A. Planning and Coordination 

1. Lead the Association in strategy planning; establishing and 
maintaining a long-range program. Lead the Association to set goals and 
encourage the churches to work toward them. 

2. Coordinate the associational work and meetings by serving as 
ex-officio member of all committees. 

3. Work with program officers and the Nominating Committee is selecting 
and enlisting leaders for organizations and committees of the Association. 

4. Counsel, encourage, and lead in training the associational officers. 
B. Education and Promotion 

1. Seek to assist the pastors and the churches in programs suitable 
for their growth and development, recognizing the differences in size and 
diversity or membership, utilizing persuasion to promote fellowship and cooperation. 

2. Seek out in cooperation with the Missions Committee, places 
of missions need and seek to enlist and appropriate church to meet these 
needs. In the event no church (es) can be enlisted, upon the instruction 

of the Missions Committee, the Director of Missins may lead in such a program ■ ■ 
in the name of Stony Fork Baptist Association. 

3. Promote church organizational programs: Sunday School, Disciple- 
ship training. Church Music, Brotherhood, WMU, and Vacation Bible School 

and Leadership Training. 

4. Promote church assistance programs: Evangelism, Stewardship, 
and Family Life. 

5. Plan for and promote simultaneous efforts, such as: World 
Missions Conferences, revival crusades, enlargement campaigns, training school, 
etc. 

5. Prepare in cooperation with the Missins Committee an annual 
associational calendar. Prepare a monthly associational newsletter for distribution 
in the Association. 

7. Attend denominational meetings and conferences as budget and 
time considerations permit. 



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8. Report to the executive board at its regular meetings and to 
the Association in annual session. 
C. Service Ministry 

1. Provide counsel and help as requested by pastors and churches. 

2. Serve as pulpit supply, assist in church surveys/ and conduct 
studies and revivals as requested in keeping with terms of employment. Pulpit 
supply for a period of 4 weeks. 

3. Manage the associational office, supervise associational employees, 
and maintain equipment of the Association. 

4. Cooperate with the Finance Committee in planning the budget 
and promoting giving to the Association. 

5. Establish and announce office hours to best utilize the division 
of time between the assocational office and field responsibilities. 

6. Always working through the pastor, the Director of Missions 
will be available to offer aid to churches in need of assistance. No program 
will be conducted for a church without the invitation of the pastor and/or 
church. In the event the church is without a pastor, the Director of Missions 
will respond to requests from the church leadership. 

Section 2. TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT 

A. term of Office - The Director of Missins shall be called for an 
indefinite term of service - 

B. Remuneration - Remuneration will be recommended by the Missions 
and Finance Committees and approved by Stony Fork Baptist Association. 

C. Honorariums - Honorariums received for pulpit supply, weddings, 
funerals, revivals, and pastoral service, not directly related to his normal 
responsibilities; shall be considered personal remuneration. 

D. Work Schedule - Work schedules will vary, with weekends normally 
being kept for services in churches in the Association. 

E. Work Accountability - The Missions Committee pledges itself to a 
ministry of loyalty, support, and loving encouragement of the Director of 
Missins, so that under the leadership of the Spirit of God, he may render 
the most effective service possible. 

F. Both parties must give a thirty day notice before termination. 
Section 3. QUALIFICATIONS 

A. Spiritual - A committed Christian with a sense of definite call to 
mission service . 

B. Educational - Preferably college and seminary degrees, or their 
equivalent. 

C. Special Knowledge and Skills - Knowledge of Baptist denominational 

life and a willingness to continue to learn; vision, flexibility, and demonstrated 
leadership, ability in planning, conducting, and evaluating the work of the 
Association. 

D. Character - Christian integrity. 

E. Experience - Pastoral ministry. Christian education or associational 
and other missin experience are necessary. Preferably the associational 
experience should be as a Director of Missions, associational staff member 

or as an active and responsible officer in the Association. The mission 
experience may be in the establishment of and involvement in mission outreach 
and ministry in a mission, church or association. 

ARTICLE VIII - Committees and Their Duties 
Section 1. The committee of Time, Place and Preacher shall be composed 
of three members. It shall be the duty of the committee to recommend to 
the Association, the churches where the next session will be held, preferably 
to be taken in alphabetical order, and also the preacher for the annual session. 



-7- 



I 



In order to alleviate any hardship on any one church hosting an associational 
meeting/ it is suggested that two churches may jointly host each meeting. Expenses, 
meeting places, and other arrangements will be coordinated by the churches selected. 

Section 2. The Committee on Resolutions shall be composed of two members. 
It shall be the duty of this committee to draw up and present to the Association 
suitable resolutions of appreciation and expressions of sentiments on any matter 
chosen by the committee or as directed by the messengers of the Association. 

Section 3. The Program Committee shall be composed of the general officers 
of the Association. It shall be the duty of this committee ot prepare and present 
a suggested order of business to be adopted by the Association. When adopted, 
the program becomes the order of business unless changed by common consent or 
by the vote of the body. 

Section 4. The Committee of Nominations shall be composed of five members 
(pastors of each church). It shall be the duty of the committee to prepare for 
the Association the names of individuals as nominees for the following officers 
and reports: Moderator, Vice-Moderator, Treasurer, Clerk, Sunday School directory, 
Discipleship Training Director, Music Directory, Vacation Bible School Director, 
Brotherhood Director, Pianist, Evangelism Director, and Associational State i 
Representatives, also persons for the following reports shall also be selected: I 
Home Missions, State Missions, Foreign Missions, Stewardship, Cooperative Program, 1 
Obituaries, Temperance an Morals, V.B.S., W.M.U., Sunday School, and any others 1 
designated by the Association. Representatives for the following shall be selected: I 
N.C. Baptist Hospital, N.C. Childrens Home, Baptist Home for the Aging, Denominational 
Colleges (Christian Higher Education), Denominational Literature, Annuity Board, 
Baptist Foundation, and any others designated by the Association. The Committee 
on Nominations shall be responsible for selection and contacting each of these 
persons for their approval before the annual meeting. The floor shall be open 
for nominations for these officers on the day of the annual meeting. Nominations | 
from the floor shall be taken first, then the Chairperson of the Nominating Commmittee 
shall give the nomination of the committee. All nominees must be contacted beforehand 
and permission given for acceptance of nomination. The W.M.U. will elect their 
officers. 

Section 5. The Finance Committee shall be composed of five members, one 
of which will include the Treasurer of the Association. It shall be the duty 
of this committee to prepare and recommend a budget for the Association and to 
suggest ways and means whereby the budget can be raised by the local churches 
and to secure the cooperation of the churches in raising the budge. The Finance 
Committee will present the proposed budged on the first day of the annual associationa 
meeting with discussion and adoption scheduled for the second day. The Finance 
Committee shall meet prior to the quarterly Executive Committee Meeting and shall 
prepare a regular form acceptable to the Association, a detailed financial report 
which shall be given to each member present at the quarterly meeting and the 
annual associational meeting. 

Section 6. The Missions Committee shall be composed of five members (pastors 
of each church) and this committee shall report to and cooperate with the Executive 
Committee of the Association. The duties of this committee are: (a) to coordinate 
and help promote through the organizations and committees all phases and activities 
of the associational programs, (b) to cooperate with the loca churches in making 
surveys of areas which, in the opinion of the Missions Committee, are not being j 
adequately served by the local missionary Baptist work, and to promote and develop 
those new phases of the Missions programs, (c) to serve in advisory capacity 
to the Director of Missions in all matters pertaining to his work and to serve 
with him in directing and promoting the missions programs of the Association, 
(d) to provide information and assistance to the departments of State Missions 
of the North Carolina Baptist Convention in meeting local missionary needs, such 



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as Missionary pastor's assistance/ promoting mission causes, etc., (e) the Missions 
Committee shall meet prior to the Executive Committee of the Association or at 
any time necessary to discharge its duties, (f) this committee shall have the 
following responsibilities relating to the office of Director of Missions: 

1. Serve as a search committee for a Director of Missions. 

2. Recommend to the Executive Committee the name of the nominee. 

3. Coordinate financial matters with the Baptist State Convention. 

4. Serve as a liaison loetween the churches and the Director of Missions. 
Section 7. The Constitution and By-Laws Committee shall be composed of 

the Missions Committee and one selected layperson of the Association making six 
members. It shall be the duty of this committee to review and update the Constitution 
and By-Laws as it becomes necessary. This committee will recommend revisions 
and amendments concerning the constitution and by-laws to the Association as 
deemed necessary. They shall meet at least once a year before the annual meeting 
to review and discuss the constitution. 

Section 8. The Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the 
churches: 

ARTICLE IX - Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of churches 

The Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the Churches shall 
be made up of the Missions Committee members. 

Section 1. Any group of baptized believers in Christ desiring to organize 
themselves into missionary Baptist church with the purpose of seeking the recognition 
of, and fellowship and cooperate with this Association, shall be required to 
fulfill the following requirements. They shall submit their request for admission 
to the Director of Missions or the Moderator of the Association, who will in 
turn forward it to the Committee of Petitionary Letters. In addition to the 
letter of request, a church must also furnish a report of work accomplished since 
its organization, a copy of the church covenant, and its articles of faith. 

Section 2. Any church seeking admission into the fellowship of the Association 
must be under the watchcare of the Association for a period of one year before 
it can be admitted. During this interim period, the church shall be expected 
to have part in the support of the causes fostered by the Association, the North 
Carolina State Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention. 

Section 3. the findings of the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall be 
reported at the annual associational meeting or at the Executive Committee meeting 
with a recommendation either for or against admission. 

Section 4. If the church is accepted under the watchcare of the Association, 
the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall recommend at the end of the year that 
the church be accepted into full fellowship provided that examination of that 
years work done and a study of the cooperative spirit of that church proves to 
be in accordance to the principles of the churches of the Association. A two-thirds 
majority vote of the Messengers or Executive Committee members present shall 
be needed for such an action to be completed. There will be an appropriate program 
conducted during the annual meeting to formally welcome this new church into 
the Association. 

Section 5. For a sister cooperative Missionary Baptist church that is affiliated 
with the Southern Baptist Convention, that wishes to join or transfer status, 
the same procedure is needful with the exception of the one year of associatinal 
watchcare. Upon receipt of letter of request, the Committee of Petitions shall 
recommend its findings to the Executive Committee, and after a thirty day period 
of investigation, the discretion of the Executive Committee shall be used if 
immediate acceptance of fellowship is possible. If accepted, a program of welcoming 
shall be presented at the annual associational meeting. 



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ARTICLE X - Amendments 

The constitution or any part of the constitution shall be 
amended at the annual associational meeting in August, with the 
acceptance by two-thirds majority vote. It is suggested that all 
changes and recommendations of amendments be submitted two months 
prior to the annual meeting, to the Constitution and By-Laws 
Committee for their careful consideration; however, any messenger 
has the right to submit proposed changes in accordance with this 
article. 

By-Laws 

1. All associational meetings shall be opened and closed 

in prayer. 

2. "Roberts Rules of Order" shall be used as a guideline 
for parliamentary procedure in all associational meetings. The 
Moderator will be responsible for having a copy of same at all 
meetings and a copy of parliamentary procedures and the gavel of 
the association shall be transferred upon succession of the 
moderator . 

3. All associational officers shall exercise authority 
over their department and shall give a financial accounting to the 
Finance Committee for monies expended. 

4. Election and installation of officers shall take 
place on the last day of the annual associational meeting in 
August, and these officers shall be responsible for planning, 
coordinating, and providing leadership for the coming year in the 
Association. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS 

Time, Place and Preacher Committee will be amended to the 
hosting church pastor or a preacher of his choice will be the 
preacher for the associational meetings. Committee membership will 
be filled according to the number of people participating in 
associational work. 

Article VIII - Committees and their duties. Section 4 amended 
to: recommendations from the Nominating Committee shall be 
presented first, then nominations will be taken from the floor. 



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THE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-THIRD 
ANNUAL MEETING 
OF 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION 

The meeting was called to order at 8:30 a.m. on August 12, 1994 at 
Rock Spring Baptist Church in Darby, N.C. by the Moderator, Rev. 
Max West. The meeting was conducted in the following order: 

8:35 Song - What a Friend we Have in Jesus". 

8:40 Devotion was led by Rev. Ron Burgett, pastor of Rock 

Spring Church, from Mary 12:41-43. Do we give our all 
to God? Several testimonies were shared followed by 
prayer. 

8:50 Adoption of program. Moved for the adoption of the 

program with changes to be made as necessary. Will 
switch Vacation Bible School with Home Missions. 

8:55 Roll Call - Bailey's Camp 5, Doe Ridge 2, Laytown 4, 

Long Ridge 3, Rock Spring 11, Sandy Flat 4, Director 
of Missions and 7 visitors. 

9:00 Recognition of new pastors and workers - Rick 

Turbyfill pastor from Laytown was recognized. 

9:05 Home Missions - Speaker - Jennifer Black. Ms. Black is 

a senior at ASU and a member of the Baptist Student Union. 
She went to Amherst, near Buffalo, N.Y. for 10 weeks last 
summer. She noted the number of apartment complexes and 
decided to work with the children of the church and the 
community. The average attendance was 120-125 but used to 
be 900. The church had had some divisions but was 
rebuilding. She stayed with different families each week 
or so. The people were very friendly. The area had lots 
of farmland, not part of the city. She was part of the 
church outreach program and helped pass out over 2,000 
fliers in 2 days. It something was going on at the 
church, all the members were there. Most of the people in 
the area are Catholic and there are few Baptist Churches. 
"We can be missionaries where ever we go. There is such 
a need for other Christians in the New York area. It was 
very hard to leave Amherst and I left unsolved problems - 
teaching a child to read, a homeless person I thought 
possessed by demons and was trying to help. God uses us 
to our capabilities. Pray for Amherst Baptist Church. 

9:15 Roy Gryder spoke to this report as he related to the 

speaker with similar experiences. George Berry also 
stated that he had spent 6 years in the area which gives 
a greater foresight among our own people. "Thank God for 
these young people who spend their summers as 
missionaries." Rev. E.O. Bustle spoke of the time he 
spent in Washington State, Montana, Ohio and Utah as a 
missionary. "Now my greatest mission is just 2 miles from 
my house at the Linville Falls camping area where I 
witness to campers and fishermen, mission action one on 
one . " 



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9; 25: Foreign Missions - Speaker - Skip Greene, building 
contractor in Boone. Scripture - Romans 12, we all 
have different gifts. Christ gives each of us unique 
gifts and no two people have the exact same combination. 
Christ calls us to use those talents. Doors are more 
open in many foreign countries than ever before. I first 
worked in the West Virginia partnership, then went to 
West Africa in the Togo partnership several times, building 
a relationship with the people there. We have a universal 
kin-ship with people all over the world. Next month, I 
will be a part of the Poland partnership when 25 North 
Carolina Baptist will go to the dedication of the seminary 
built there. Also the Ukraine partnership has chosen to 
work with a local community where no other Americans have 
been, helping plumbing and building a church in Ivanovka. 
People are still corresponding with us because of the 
relationships created. We have one more year of the 
partnership, but it may be extended 2 years. We are also 
sponsoring a home missionary going out to establish new 
work. We have a medical team in Czechoslovakia and Zaire. 
There are individuals on small projects all over the world, 
some are still in Brazil. There are only 4,000 Southern 
Baptist foreign missionaries to impact the world. 12,000 
men and women have given their time and resources to go to 
places and to walk with people different from themselves as 
volunteers. The rewards cannot be described. 

9:40 Break - refreshments. 

10:00 Evangelism - Speaker Milton Hollifield - as Missionary 
Southern Baptists we are evangelists, tied together. 
Missions and evangelism are what our SBC is about. 1.8 
billion people claim to be Christians. 2.3 billion people 
have heard about but not received Jesus. 1.8 billion 
people in our world have never heard the story of Jesus. 
Some of them are around us in N.C. 

We do a variety of things in training evangelists. We 
work with youth in camps and conferences, teaching them 
how to share their faith with others. We help churches 
to prepare for revivals. Churches and associations like 
Stony Fork make up our convention. We could not exist 
without them. We are people joining hands across the 
nation to reach the loss, leading them to trust Jesus. 
The world is coming to your area, work in the resort 
ministries to reach them. In 1995 our major evangelism 
emphasis will be "Here's Hope - Share Jesus Now". We are 
asking people to make a commitment between 1-9-95 and 
3-9-95 to intensify their efforts for personal witnessing 
and attempt to share their faith with someone else 60 times 
in 60 days. Leaflets will be sent to pastors with 60 ways 
to share the gospel. Make a commitment now to be involved. 
Then we will have harvest revivals. The possibilities are 
exciting. 



-12- 



10:20 Finance Report - Edith Gryder, treasurer gave out copies of 

the proposed budget for 1994-1995. Nothing has changed. 

If you have any changes that need to be made, let us know. 

(see proposed budget) 
10:30 Vacation Bible School/Sunday School - Speaker - Lewis 

Gentry - In a Southern Baptist Church we divide the work 

into 5 areas. 

1. Music - good Christian music to help us worship. 

2. Discipleship training - to train our workers in all 
areas. 3. WMU/Brotherhood - teaches us missions and how 
to do them. 4. Worship services - preaching. 5. Sunday 
School - to teach the message of the Bible. One of these 
5 is no more important than the other. The Sunday school 
tasks are to reach, teach, win and develop. Teachers are 
taught to evangelize as they teach. New member Christians 
need to be taught as they grow in Christ. There are 5 
steps in Sunday school growth: 1. Know your possibilities 
- keep an enrollment file of prospects. 2. Enlarge your 
organization - plan a Sunday school of classes that will 
meet the needs of the possibilities. 3. Train your 
workers - Discipleship training will help with that. 4. 
Provide adequate facilities and resources. 5. Go and 
get them! ! . If they are not going to any other church, 
they are prospects for mine. Matthew 28: 18-20 is the 
great commission as is Deut. 31:12. Jesus looked out on 
the fields ready for harvest and wept. 

When we are excited, those who come into our churches 
will be excited. If we are not, neither will they be. 

Vacation Bible School is a happy, exciting time. We win 
more children in VBS than we do in the Sunday School Dept. 
You can have VBS anytime. Do not overlook it, but train 
your workers in how to teach and conduct VBS. 
10:45 State Missions - Speaker - Roy Holder - We have 80 

associations in 100 counties in N.C. In 1993 over 1992 
Stony Fork Association increased its giving 38% to State 
Missions. The State Missions offering is in Sept. 
Sometimes we give little thought to this offering but all 
our mission work is affected by this offering - WMU, Youth 
Ministries, the disaster van. Brotherhood, language 
ministries, and the Church Extension Dept. that promotes 
establishing new churches. 

Please promote this in your church. The materials have 
been mailed to your pastor. 



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10:55 Biblical Recorder - Speaker - R.G. Puckett - The Biblical 
recorder was birthed about this time 168 years ago. About 
60 delegates voted to begin the state Baptist paper, The 
Biblical Recorder. It is only a means to an end. Our 
vision is to tell N.C. Baptist what is happening across the 
state. Me may not like the news, but we need to know. The 
good has the opportunity to address itself to the bad. 
There are three key words in being a Baptist in 
relationship to other Baptists - missions, education and 
benevolence. We have the freedom to work together with 
other Baptist to spread the gospel of Jesus Christ. We do 
what we think is right to do where we are with the 
resource we have. (1 Cor. 16:8-10) Our purpose is to tell 
Baptist what has happened so they can tell others. 

11:15 Retirement Homes - Speaker - Calvin Knight - The number of 
older adults is steadily growing in this country. 12% of 
the people today are 65 or older. The fastest growing age 
group is 85 or older. Many people are living to be 100! 
We are facing an increasing number of people who are 
disabled and need some assistance with activities of daily 
living. Who is responsible for these people? We are. As 
Christians we are responsible. God decreed it in his word 
- "Ye shall honor your father and mother". We are 
accountable for the care of our parents and other older 
people. When they cannot be cared for at home, they are 
cared for in some type of institution. We began this 
ministry in 1943 and have 4 homes spread across the state, 
featuring various levels of care from independent living in 
apartments to skilled nursing care, providing care for 500 
residents. Not all of their expenses are covered by 
insurance and that is why we have our Home for the Aged 
offering each year. 

On a personal note, my mother was a resident for 5 years 
and died at age 98 10 days ago. I came to appreciate the 
level of care she received there and the North Carolina 
Baptists for helping to provide the funds to provide the 
care. 

11:30 Baptist Hospital - Speaker - Harold Bennett - Thank you 
in a very special way for your support and caring for the 
hospital. Thank you for giving to the Mother's Day 
offering. Some of the stories we hear are sad but the 
benevolent funds have made a difference. 100% of the 
funds from the Mother's Day offering goes to the Benevolent 
Care Fund for N.C. Baptist. The Christian faith is the 
soul of our institution. 

11:40 Christian Higher Education - Speaker - Sue Fitzgerald - 
Much building and changes are going on at Mars Hill. 
Sometimes we prefer to old way of doing things but would 
you like to go back to no computers or calculators? In 
your colleges we want to keep up with the changes, to give 
your children the best skills. But skills are not enough. 
They need to see that skills are a part of ministry in 



-14- 



their life. We seek to help students have faith. We want 
to help them grow in faith, and to know that faith has to 
be exposed through service. Most students work in 
community services, mission trips, National Parks, local 
churches, etc. Thank you for your support of your Baptist 
schools . 

11:45 Baptist Foundation - Speaker - Coy Jeans - In 1995 the 
Baptist Foundation will be 75 years old. In 1919 the 
Southern Baptist Convention voted for establishing the 
Fund. It began with $2,000 and now has $46,000,000 
(in 1993). "Let not your heart be troubled" about death. 
No matter what age group, you need to put down on paper 
what you want to be done with the assets you leave. 

Seize the opportunity to leave a lasting memorial in our 
kingdom work through the Baptist Foundation. This work 
will continue until Christ returns. 
11:55 Cooperative Program/Stewardship - Speaker - Talmadge 
Williams - Stewardship: Romans 8-29, 2 Peter 3:18. 
Growing as a Christian means feeding on the word and 
praying every day and trying to serve others in their 
Christian growth. We have been predestined to be 
conformed to the likeness of Jesus. It is not instant, 
but a process of growing. All of us do not have the same 
understanding of what stewardship is. We are all 
accountable to God for what he has entrusted us. Five 
things he has entrusted to us include: 1. The gospel - 
and how to share it. 2. Our lives - and how to live them. 

3. Other people - and how we relate to and care for them. 

4. Spiritual gifts - and how we are responsible to Him for 
them. 5. Material things - and how we use them. 

The Cooperative Program is a funding program for all the 
ministries the SBC feels we ought to be about. We pool 
our resources to do together what we feel God has called 
us to do. Give to the Cooperative Program so something 
important can be achieved. 
12:10 Annual Message - Richard Baird - 2 Corinthians 5:10-18. 

- Discouragement unto Determination - Discouragement is 
something we all go through, not only as an individual 
but as a church and even as an association. It comes 
every way in every form. Pastors are very discouraged. 
Laypeople are turning their backs on the church. Our 
families discourage us. Discouragement is tearing us 
down and stealing our encouragement but we can move from 
discouragement to determination by: 1. Being aware of the 
fear of God - respect what He is. 2. Persuading men to 
come to God because they are lost and dead. 3. Preaching 
the word of God to the believers. 4. Being aware of the 
coming of the Lord Jesus Christ and the time of judgement. 
The church must be about the Father'^ business. 5. Being 
aware of appreciation - the love of God, give everything in 
service to Him. 6. Being aware of the amazement of 



-15- 



Calvary. God's love is expressed in Christ. Remember 
He arose again. He lives within us. We are not in this 
battle alone, He is with us. 7. Being aware God's grace 
can change anyone, turn them inside out and make them a 
new creature. 8. Being aware there is an appointment, a 
call of God. We are all ministers and servants of God. 
He has given us the ministry of reconciliation. 9. Being 
aware that we are God's ambassador or representative, we 
speak for Him. 10. Being aware that the fields are white 
unto harvest. Rise up, put our eyes on Jesus and determine 
time is short and share the good news. 
1:00 Adjournment - Lunch 

AUGUST 13, 1994 - SANDY FLAT 

8:30 The second day of the 133 annual meeting of Stony Fork 

Association was called to order by the moderator. 
8:35 Song - "Victory in Jesus". 

8:40 Devotion - Leon Silver, Pastor at Sandy Flat. Psalms 1: 
1-5. Prayer. 

8:45 Roll Call - Bailey's Camp 4, Doe Ridge 3, Laytown 3, Long 
Ridge 2, Mt. Ephraim 0, Rock Spring 3, Sandy Flat 7, 
Visitors 4, Director of Missions. 

8:50 Children's Homes - Wilma Greene - 15,000 Children in 

N.C. are being helped in our homes. They are there because 
there is no othe help. I thank God for everyone of you 
who has helped in any way. Our kids in our Baptist Homes 
do not have anyone else who loves or cares for them. Will 
you care? That is the question we must ask ourselves. We 
have three drives each year to help the homes. Maybe you 
would like to be involved. Some of the cottages at 
Thomasville have leaked and the cilings have fallen in and 
repairs are needed. If you can't do this, make little tray 
favors with Bible verses to give the children on Sunday 
morning. I will be glad to come speak at any church. This 
burden for the children has never left me. There is a job 
to do, and it is up to us. 

9:05 Woman's Missionary Union - Speaker - Ruby Reese - The 

foundation of the WMU is found in Matt. 28:18020. This 
commission was not limited to just the few people Jesus 
was speaking to. The scriptures say to go. Now, 2,000 
years later, modern day disciples are you, sitting on the 
pews here today and great things will happen to you and 
your people. Woman's Missionary Union's purpose is to 
evangelize, study, teach and do missions. Missions are 
essential to every church. WMU tries to help church 
members to learn who their neighbors are and how to 
minister to them. Mission studies are held to help 
members lear what missions are about. The presence of a 
WMU makes a very healthy church. We have 8,843 
missionaries serving us at home and abroad, but what are 
we doing here at home in Watauga County? Our magazines and 
programs will change over the next year but WMU will not. 
When we care, we give and we go. 



-16- 



9:25 Temperance and Morals - Speaker - Joe Moody. I have spent 
25 years in law enforcement in Watauga County. We are 
servants of the people. Our rules and regulations come out 
of Raleigh. Our code of conduct comes out of the local 
office. If the Sheriff is a Christian, this is reflected. 
Some of our code of conduct is on a national level. We are 
to serve mankind. My decisions will not be compromised. 
If an officer is not doing what he should be, just speak to 
Sheriff Lyons and he will check into it. Crimes are solved 
in Watauga County because we interact with the people and 
they cooperate with us. You can make a difference in the 
type of law enforcement you have. The church is a big 
deterrent to crime. Law officers are duty-bound to take 
action and so are you as church members. 

9:: 50 Discipleship Training - Speaker - Mabel Couch - Church 

Growth Multiplier. We represent the Convention when they 
are unable to go to every church and association where 
there is a need. 

We need to pray about something before we say "I can't do 
that". God has promised to go with us. We do work shops, 
missions fairs, conferences, and we will help in training 
on how to use Southern Baptist literature. There are going 
to be some changes coming in all our literature in the fall 
of 1995. The best way to learn is to talk to the Lord and 
let him lead us. This would be an excellent year to use 
your multipliers to help you with training in using our new 
literature. In the midst of this world, God can still 
speak in a still small voice but we have to hold on to what 
we believe. He calls us through his work also, and through 
sermons from a pastor who is burdened. (Eph. 4: 11-13) If 
you ever need me in your church or association, I am 
available, just give me a call. Keep us in your prayers. 
10:05 Break 

10:25 Stewardship - Roy Gryder - (see report) N.Y. Missions 

update. The Executive Committee voted last month to send 
$900. to Trinity Church in N.Y. for a baptistery. We plan 
to go up in Sept. to install this and work on the 
parsonage. We plan to take anyone interested, lades are 
invited. We will also work on the roof. We will be 
leaving Saturday, Sept. 3. 

10:40 Resolutions - Betty Woods 

10:45 Obituaries - Clerk. Special note of Rosetta Hollifield, 
a faithful member of the association. Prayer and a moment 
of silence. 

10:50 Director of Missions - George Berry - The FMB needs over 
1,000 volunteers to go to Kenya in June, 1995. Pray for 
all our work. Take care of your pastors. Your work and 
your giving are never in vain. 

10:55 Business Meeting. 

1. Moved to add $200.00 for expenses for delegates to the 
State Convention. Seconded and approved and budget 
approved. 



-17- 



2. Election of officers: Director of Missions - George 
Berry, Moderator - Ron Burgett, Vice Moderator - John 
McCoury, Treasurer - Edith Gryder, Clerk - Linda Mills, 
Vacation Bible School - Barbara West, Discipleship 
Training - Charles Craig, Stewardship - Roy Gryder, 
Sunday School Directory - Bonnie Walsh, Children's 
Homes - Jeri Triplett, Baptist Hospital - Edwana Smith, 
Retirement Homes - Mamie Craig, Foreign Missions - John 
McCoury, Christian Action League - Rick Turbyfill, Home 
Missions - Vera Dula, State Missions - Charles Smith, 
Christian Higher Education - Debbie Walsh, Cooperative 
Program - Pauline Berry, Song Leader - Pauline Eldreth, 
Resolutions - Betty Woods, Obituaries - Clerk, Biblical 
Recorder - Allison Smith, Baptist Foundation, Dale 
Luttrell . 

Committees: Missions - Pastors of each church. 
Nominating - Max West, Chairman, pastors each church. 
Finance - Moderator, DOM, Treasurer, Vice Moderator, 
Roy Gryder, Clerk. Moved to approve above officers 
for the coming year, seconded and approved. 

3. Moved, seconded and approved to drop Assoc. Youth 
Leader - each church will coordinate own events and 
invite associational youth if desired. 

4. Moved to make $1,000 available to Roy Gryder for the 
N.Y. trip to be used if necessary. Seconded and 
approved. 

5. Moved to adjourn business meeting. Seconded and 
approved. Closed with prayer 

11:20 Annual Message - Leon Silver - John 1:1-14, Christians as 
Light Reflectors. The moon is a giant light reflector, 
also the earth is a reflector of heat. Jesus is the life 
of man. John uses the work light 54 times in his writings. 
Jesus Christ's light is still shining today. He was sent 
to be the light of the world and darkness cannot over-power 
His light. The darkness is the unbelief and sin of men. 
The word light is used to describe many things from Genesis 
to Revelation. Jesus came to deliver the light from the 
darkness. Some of our older Christians are such light 
reflectors that it is almost like a halo. Their lives are 
a shining example for us all. Jesus chose 12 disciples to 
help him spread the light while he was on earth. We all 
need this light. People walking in darkness are light lost 
sheep, they need the light to guide them through the dark 
fog. When they accept Christ as savior, the dark clouds 
roll away and everything is beautiful. Without the light, 
there would be no spiritual life. We all need that light 
in our lives today. The light brings the fruit. Christ 
brought us abundant life and we are to reflect the light to 
the lost world. Where there is light, there is heat. Have 
we Christians grown cold? Is that why people do not see 
the light in our lives? Today, I am asking all of you to 
be light reflectors. 

11:50 Adjournment - Ron Burgett, Moderator, Prayer 
Lunch 



-18- 



PROPOSED BUDGET FOR STONY FORK ASSOCIATION 

1994 - 1995 



Director of Missions $3,000.00 

Annuity - Director of Missions 624.00 

Clerical-Misc . (postage) 50.00 

Clerk Honorarium 250.00 

Treasurer Honorarium 250.00 

Vacation Bible School 200.00 

Phone 50.00 

Discipleship Training 150.00 

Evangelism 125 . 00 

WMU 150 .00 

Associational Retreats 250.00 

Expenses for State Convention 200.00 

Assoc. representative 

Total $5,549.00 



-19- 



f 

I' 

I, 




REPORTS 



HOME MISSIONS 

The Home Mission Board was started in 1845. It is almost 
150 years old. It was started the same year the Southern 
Baptist Convention was formed. 

There are 4,882 home missionaries now working in all 50 
states, the Carribean, American Samoa, Guam and Canada. 

The Home Mission Board estimates that 115 million people in 
the United States are not claimed by any denomination. 
Through Bold Mission Thrust, Southern Baptists set a goal of 
50,000 churches by A.D. 2000. 

Southern Baptists started 1500 new congregations in 1993. 
Of thiese, it is significatn to not that 795 were black and 
ethnic congregations, while 705 were Anglo. 

We support the Home Mission Board and the home missionaries 
through the Annie Armstrong Easter offering. This offering 
is vital to home missions. It provides 46% of the total 
budget, and 100% goes to the field. 

150 years ago. Southern Baptists had a vision for reaching 
their homeland for Christ. Let us pray that Southern 
Baptists will continue their strong support of home missions 
through their prayers, their sacfifical gifts, and their 
volunteer support. 



Vera Dula 



-20- 



Home Mission Board, sbc 

Christ for Our Nation 



HUB 



1993 ANNUAL REPORT SUMMARY/fflGHUGHTS 



The Home Mission Board (HMB) is a missionary -sending agency of the Southern Baptist Convention 
SBC). Headquartered in Atlanta, Ga., the HMB's purpose is to serve Southern Baptists by assisting churches 
3 proclaim the gospel of Jesus Christ, start and grow New Testament congregations, and minister to people in 
lie name of Christ. 



At the end of last year, 4,882 missions personnel were serving in the United States, the Caribbean, 
juam, American Samoa, and Canada. The HMB also had endorsed more than 2,300 chaplains who were serving 

1 healthcare agencies, institutions, businesses, the military, and pastoral-care roles. More than 1,700 Mission 
ervice Corps volunteers were serving on home mission fields. During the year there were 1 ,500 church starts 
more than four per day) and 349,073 baptisms. 

Approximately half of the HMB's support comes from individual SBC churches through the aimual Annie 
Armstrong Easter Offering for Home Missions. In 1993, gifts to the offering totaled $36.31 million, about 3 
ercent less than the 1992 total. One hundred percent of the offering goes to support the work of home 
lissionaries in the field. The 1994 Armie Armstrong Easter Offering goal is $40 million. About 36 percent of 
\t HMB's income comes from the denomination's Cooperative Program. 

f 

The following is a summary of program/support ministry highlights from 1993: 

Chaplaincy Ministries—The 2,325 Southem Baptists now serving as chaplains and pastoral counselors reported 
lore than 24,000 professions of faith and 4^00 baptisms. 

Church Loans— .Approximately 1,056 churches had active loans totaling $131.1 million. The Church Loans 

)ivision closed 120 church loans totaling $32 million, including $3.8 million of refmancing. 

.anguage Missions— Home missionaries and pastors in the Language Church Extension Division serve among 

02 ethnic groups using 98 languages and dialects. 

Evangelism— During Crossover Houston, the Mass Evangelism Department coordinated 35 street evangelism 
vents, 25 block parties, nine evangelistic rallies, and 68 special Harvest Revivals and events. These activities 
esulted in 1^53 conversions. The Personal Evangelism Department produced and shipped materials for "Here's 
lope. Share Jesus Now." This emphasis will include 60 Days of Soul-Winning, January 9-March 9, 1995. 
Volunteers— More than 74,860 Southem Baptist adults, college students, and youth group members volunteered 
or long- and short-term projects. In addition, several thousand more were involved in disaster relief efforts in 
he Midwest. 

Zhurch Evangelism Development— Over 1 million teens participated in "See You At The Pole," gathering at 
heir flagpoles to pray for the schools of our nation. 

Administration— The Home Mission Board broke ground for a new national office building which will be 
;ompleted in 1995. Customer Services received more than 51,000 calls and shipped almost 5 million pieces of 
■iMB material. 



1 ^iC Spnnij Street NW • Atlanta, Georgia lO^nTodOl • (404) 898-700i 



'0 



A SnmKcra Baptist Comvmum a.?enc% .upp,mcd K the O^npcr.nnc Pn-cram and the .Annie Armsmmt; Easter O/fcrm^; 

-21- 



HOME MISSION BOARD BOLD MISSION THRUST 
GOALS AND RESULTS 





1993 


1994 


4 A A f 

19B5 


2000 




Goals 


Rasults 


Qoils 


Qoais 


Qoais 


BAPTISMS (TDTAL) 


412,500 


349,073 


425,000 


KAA 

437,500 


KAA AAA 

500.000 


Adult 


189. 7S0 


184,747 


• AC BAA 

Ivo.aOO 


201 ,250 


AAA AAA 

230,000 


Youth 


104,000 


•0,481 


107,000 


1 10,000 


125,000 




1 18,750 


113,S8f 


« AA >AA 

122.900 


a AA AKA 

1 26,250 


% AK AAA 

145.000 


MEMBERSHIP: (ThauMnds) 


15.740 


IS, 405 


1 0,920 


4 A 4 AA 


1 7 AAA 


AM WORSHIP ATT.: (TnoUMnOi) 


4.300 


4,810 


A A A A 

4,400 


A KAA 

4,500 


A AAA 
5,000 


^'bHUernAueUr OHURCrCSu-lJVVNi 


61% 


58% 


63% 


ASM 

65% 


75% 


NUMBcn Or CWjhCtES (ConsstuMO) 


40.500 


38,741 


41 ,000 


A 4 KAA 

41 ,500 


A A AAA 

44.000 


k ■ A JBCB AC LAfitt^AJD AfiCBA Yen 


4.830 


7,971 


A AAA 

4,996 


C 4 K9 

5.16Z 


A AAA 
O.OOO 


CCNQ^uMnuNS 


45.330 


48,712 


A B AAA 

45,996 


46,662 


A A AAA 
50,000 


Angm 


38.534 


38,497 


M A AAA 

38.000 


4 A A4 A 

39,238 


A 4 AAA 

41 .000 


etnnic 


5.451 


8,588 


O.O/Z 


C SOI 

9.6*9 


7 AAA 

f ,000 




1.345 


1,627 


1 ,436 


1 ,531 


2.000 


NEW CHURCH ST Am IS 


1,500 


1,500 


1 ,500 


4 C AA 

1 ,500 


4 KAA 
1 ,500 




900 


70S 


AAA 
WOO 


AAA 

wOO 


AAA 
• 00 


eirtnic 


525 


521 


929 


K 9K 

9Z9 


3Z9 


BUCK 


75 


274 


75 


75 


75 




60% 


84% 






f 9T» 


vnArlAINS ( 1 Olal) 


2.435 


2,331 


9 CAK 
Z,909 


9 £nK 
Z,OU9 


9 AAA 

i9,WUU 


Militaiy 


1,180 


1,018 


4 1 A A 
1 ,1*0 


4 99A 

1 ,Z90 


4 9£ A 

1 ,960 




805 


771 




aofl 
o vo 


1 09^ 
1 ,Uc9 


Ingtitutionai 


255 


303 


257 


259 


310 


Bu«n«M^ndustial 


195 


237 


204 


218 


305 


MSSON PER90MCL (ToaO 


4.275 


4,882 


4.378 


4.481 


5,000 


Piantan 


923 


1,018 


1.000 


1.050 


1,250 


Pastors 


2.109 


1.848 


2.135 


2.161 


2,300 


MlnittPM 


647 


472 


668 


689 


800 


DOlMk 


389 


345 


392 


395 


410 


EwiQ. MnsioruhM 


111 


93 


117 


123 


160 


Mttskm Sorvica Corps 




977 








Olhar Missionarias 


96 


129 


66 


63 


80 


VOLUNTEERS (TotiO 


56.475 


74,860 


59.550 


62.625 


77.000 


Mission Sarvioa Corps 


1.475 


1,753 


1,550 


1.625 


2.000 


Short Tarm 


55.000 


62.241 


58.000 


61.000 


75.000 


Evangalisffl A Language 




10,866 









Sourca: Rasaarch Division, Planning and Financa Saction, HMB 



-22- 



FOREIGN MISSIONS REPORT 1994 



I am proud to be a part of Foreign missions. Our praysers, 
gifts and missionaries helped make many things possible. 
First, I would like to give some past history. "We have, in 
all 94 missionaries, and 9 native assistants. 629 baptisms 
were reported last year (1893), making a total membership of 
3,328". (The Foreign Mission Journal, June 1894) This was 
100 years ago. Look what Foreign Missions have advanced to 
in June, 1994. Current count: 4,011 FMB missionary 
personnel in 12 countries of service. 

1993 set many records: 1. Churches have nearly doubled in 
six years with a 7.29% increase this year.l 2. Church 
membership showed an 8.26% increase over the previous year. 

FOREIGN MISSIONS 1993 

1993 totals in major categories of ministries from Baptist 
groups overseas with with FMB personnel work 

35,188 churches 
2,019 new churches 
3,735,949 church membership 
262,758 baptisms 

2,230,282 Bible-teaching ministries 
25,327 preaching points 
29,061 pastors 



KENYANS FIRST-YEAR HIGHLIGHTS 

40 joint projects 

3,935 Kenyans accepted Christ 

17 Baptist Congregations begun 

Training for 5,400 Kenyans 

Medical care for 2,225 Kenyans 

28 construction projects 

127 volunteers involved 



John McCoury 




1993 \oi3ls irom'Dverseas^ Baptislsj^^.-y^:^,iy 



2,500 



1,000 



' . ' 500 




- 1988 ,'1989'- 1990 1991 ' 1992 1993 

Source: Foreign Mission Board Office of Research and Planning 



Prayer as missions strategy 



Kentucky youtii 'called' to Japan after witnessing at liome 



Adam Dedman wants to get child- 
hood over with so he can do 
things, like be a missionary to Ja- 
pan, says his father, David Dedman. 

In a letter to the FMB, Adam, 13, 
of Lexington, Ky., v/rote: "I have 
seen God work in my life....Japan 
needs more missionaries. Look at 
Billy Graham. He's brought millions 
of people to Christ. I'm not saying 
that I can bring millions, but even if I 
just bring one, that's something." * 

Adam's exposure to Japanese 
culture began in 1987 when Toyota 
opened an assembly plant near his 
home. In second grade at the time, 
Adam was unaffected by the fanfare 
touting the plant's economic impact. 
But he did notice a slightly dazed 



child who was ushered into his class 
one day. The student, Tonohiro 
Nakazawa, did not know English. 

Adam became friends with Tono- 
hiro. Later, after Tonohiro learned 
English, Adam learned Japanese. 
Today he can keep up with conver- 
sations Detween Tonohiro ano other 
Japanese friends. Some of the con- 



versations turn toward God. 

"My Japanese friends are just lik 
anybody," Adam says. They have 
questions about who they are and 
what they believe in. ...A lot.. .don't 
believe in anything. So I just talk to 
them and witness to them because 
me good news is too good noi to 
share with others." 



if U.S. agencies ranked by income 
V for overseas missions 

■ ..- . jil.- ... ^^;^.<.. ■ - 

I 176 Ot 

worSviSr'^ , ■■ ■ ■ " 

' lesfl 

Ponlfn MttkWn Bo«f«. SBC 



Asa*mbH«t of Qod 



Wycttn* BlbW Trvnslctera 



52 0| - 



Cbifrcti«a of Chiltl 



MAP lnt*matlon«l 



Camput CrusMM tor Cnrtd 



CompMtton tmvmatlofVI / 

"Souro*. MARC Missiom M«n(ft>CT.-« (For eoino«rt»oni ItMltg- 



Gifts to FMB turn downward in 1993 



In 1993. total gifts 
to the FfvlB were 
down compared 
with the previous 
year's gifts for the 
first time since 
1932. Gifts to the 
board have been 
down relative to 
inflation, howev- 
er, every year but 
one since 1986. 

(Gifts adjusted to 1993 

ftnllarg fip pmph ) 




76 77 78 79 '80 '81 '82 '83 '84 '85 '06 '87 '88 '89 "90 "91 "92 "9! 



-24- 



Financial Report 
for 

STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Annual Meeting 
August 12, 1994 



Balance August 1, 1993: $5158.01 





_ t_ 1 i LA X 


Vi ^ Q ' 




— Bailey's 'J amp 


3) O J L- . 


u u 


I 4> J LI 


--Doe Kidge 


•J i : . 


U U 


{ DU 


- - La/town 


3 99. 


00 


( 8 4 


--Long Ridge 


520 . 


00 


( 20 


--Mt. Ephriam 


150 . 


00 




--Rock Spring 


13 7 'j . 


91 




--Sandy Fiat 


15 8 4 . 


86 


( 100 


Other: 








--Sue Fitzgerald 


20 . 


00 




--N C Convention 


99 . 


81 




--('ieorge Berry 


5 1 j . 







--Offerings for 








New York Mission 


244 . 


00 





mm . 



Total Contributions 



Expenditures : 








— Ceorge Berry 


( Travel ) 


$3000 


. 00 


- -Annul ty 


( G . B . ) 


624 . 


00 


--Linda Mills 


(Clerk Hon) 


250 


. 


--Edith Gryder 


( Treas . Hon . ) 


250 , 


, 00 


--Precision Printing (Min) 


147 


. 2 7 


--Convention Ex 


pense 






(George Berry & 


Charles Craig) 


155 


. 00 


--Disciple Trai 


ning Conf . 


45, 


. 00 


--Telephone 




25 


. 18 


- -Postage 




11 , 


.■60 


- - New Yo r k Miss 


ion 


720 


. 




Total E 


xpendi tures 



Total Balance in Treasure 7/31 ''94: 
Total in New York Mission Fund: 
Total in Association General Fund: 



5405 . 58 



$10563 . 59 



5226 .05 
'$5T335~54 
1019 . 00 
4316 . 54 



An offering of $196.90 was taken at the 

March Executive meeting and given to 

William Kanupp to apply to his trip to Russia. 

Additional contributions to the New York trip: 

Laurel Fork Baptist Church gave $50 for gas plus the use of 

trieir van. 

Blue Ridge Mitsubishi loaned the use of a van. 
Bill Miller gave a tank of gas. 



$726.35 was given by Sandy Flat, Doe Ridge, and Bailey's Camp 
to be divided between the workers who went to New York. 



-25- 



VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 



Three of our churches had Vacation Bible School this year 
with a total attendance of 147. All three churches used our 
Southern Baptist materials. 

Please remember I am available to help you with your Vaction 
Bible School if needed. If you have any questions or 
concerns, give me a call. 

Remember, many of our children attend Vacation Bible School 
that do not come to our churches at any other time. This is 
an important field that needs to be harvested. Follow up on 
the children that do not attend other services and encourage 
them to come to Sunday School. 



Barbara West 




JOURNAL OF THE BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION OF NORTH CAROLINA 
P BOX 26568 • RALEIGH NORTH CAROLINA 2761 1 



G Pucketl Editor 



MEMORANDUM 
22.6.94 



TO: 



Associational Leaders 



FROM: 



Editor R.G. Puckett 



RE: 



Biblical Recorder report for annual meeting 



Attached is a copy of the report for the Biblical Recorder to your 
association for the annual meeting in 1994. 

As it has been done for years, the report has been designed so that you 
may photocopy it for inclusion in your book of reports. Some may choose to 
reproduce the page and distribute it individually to the messengers. Some 
associations have indicated they would like for the Recorder to supply an 
adequate number of copies for the annual meeting. We can do that, if you 
will notify us. 

You are well aware of the fact that this is a most crucial time in 
Southern Baptist history. The controversy in the national convention has 
created much pain and stifled the progress of our cooperative Baptist work 
as was evidenced in the annual SBC meeting in Orlando this past June, The 
conflict has damaged some churches and could conceivably damage the 
associations and the Baptist State Convention. 

There is a tremendous need for Baptists to be better informed. Despite 
the fact we have access to so much information, there is still a great 
amount of misunderstanding and misinformation circulating. Never a week, and 
hardly a day, passes without calls or letters to the Recorder asking for 
information (and often documentation) on some erroneous perception or 
misguided issue which have potential for harming Baptists. We are always 
glad to help. 

The Recorder needs your help and you will be helping the entire Baptist 
family as we inform and enlist others in the Great Commission which has been 
given to each of us as disciples and our churches. 

We can supply you with a computer printout of the number of subscribers 
in each church in your association, if that would be helpful to you in the 
promotion of subscriptions. 

If I can help you in any way to inform Baptists better, please call or 
write. The address and telephone numbers on this letter are correct. 



-27- 



Editorial ■ (919) 847 2127 • Circulation & Business (919) 847-2128 



THE BIBLICAL RECORDER 



Associational Report — 199A 



The rapid changes taking place in our world have produced distorted 
values, violence, threats and uncertainty and the surrender of much that is 
good and wholesome while creating false heroes who fail. Baptists must rise 
up to face these decisions and issues before our window of opportunity is 
lost forever. We must not squander our heritage from yesterday and our 
mission for tomorrow. 

There is no way to address these issues without correct and reliable 
information. The Biblical Recorder was born and continues to serve for that 
purpose. Never was the Recorder more needed than now, with charges and 
countercharges flying, with people trying to use and manipulate others. 

People are reading less than any time in recent history. It is true of 
secular publications, it is true of wholesome books from respected 
libraries, it is true of religious publications. We live in an electronic 
age where many think they know the answers to the issues only to discover 
they do not. It is impossible to know in depth what is happening when we 
depend on "60-second sound bites" of news on television or radio. 

An informed Baptist is a better Baptist; an uninformed Baptist may be 
an uninvolved or disruptive Baptist. No democracy, including our local 
churches, can survive long without an informed, involved constituency which 
makes decisions based upon accurate information from reliable sources. 

The most important thing facing us at this point is to get the Recorder 
into more Baptist homes than ever before. Your support as a subscriber and 
reader and your encouragement to others will enable the paper to better 
serve the constituency with accurate and helpful information delivered to 
Baptist homes and churches. We need your help! 

In order to save churches large amounts of money and to increase the 
readership of the Recorder , Church News Service (CNS) was launched in 1990. 
This system lets any congregation have their church news incorporated into 
the Biblical Recorder which saves staff time, postage and printing 
costs. Usually, for less than what it costs to produce the church 
newsletter, CNS gives the entire Baptist communication package to each 
family in the congregation. Anticipated increases in mailing costs makes CNS 
a greater value in 1995 than even when it was started in 1990. 

The paper focuses more and more attention on North Carolina Baptists 
with news, features and inspirational articles which will encourage in- 
dividuals and churches in their witness and ministry. One sure way to 
conquer problems and overcome the barriers to effective witness and ministry 
is to have the facts, know the issues and be adequately informed. With all. 
the stress and disturbance in the world, "The North Carolina Baptist Way" 
has become even more important to us than ever before. 

That is why the Recorder was born; that is why it serves today. For 
more information on how your church can subscribe or use CNS, contact: 

The Biblical Recorder 
232 West Millbrook Road 
Raleigh, NC 27609 
(919) 847-2127 



-28- 



Making Life for Older Adults. . . 

The Best of Times 



As a result of the wonderful support given 
by North Carolina Baptists, 1994 will be 
remembered as one of the finest years in 
the 43 year history of Baptist Retirement 
Homes. The following are some highlights 
from the year: 

In recognition of its commitment to 
the spiritual well-being of the 
residents that it serves. Baptist 
Retirement Homes hired W. Paul 
Riggs to serve as Chaplain to the 
residents of the Prince Nursing 
Care Center in Winston-Salem and 
the Rickman Nursing Care Center 
in Asheville. 

Reaffirming its commitment to the 
idea that retirement should be a 
"step-up" for Older Adults, the 
renovation of the Taylor House in 
Albemarle was completed and 
renovation of the Hamilton Baptist 
Home in Martin County was begun. 
When the renovation of the 
Hamilton Baptist Home is 
completed in mid-1995, all of the 
facilities operated by the Baptist 
Retirement Homes will be "State-of- 
t he -Art " 

In recognition of the changing 
profile of institutionalized Older 
Adults (477c of the "oldest old" in 
North Carolina suffer from some 
form of dementia), a special small 
group approach to the care for 
institutionalized Older Adults 
suffering from dementia was 



instituted at the Prince Nursing 
Care Center in Winston-Salem. 
Through the implementation of this 
program, Baptist Retirement Homes 
once again demonstrated its 
commitment to the principle that 
everyone has the right to age with 
dignity and to enjoy a certain 
quality of life throughout the aging 
process. 

In an effort to provide Older Adults 
with affordable care, a sub-acute 
unit was developed at the Prince 
Nursing Care Center in Winston- 
Salem ... a unit where frail Older 
Adults can receive such treatments 
as IV therapy, infusion, wound care, 
and stroke and bone fracture 
rehabilitation outside of a hospital 
setting. 

In response to the need to provide 
quality long-term care services to 
the ever growing number of frail 
Baptist Older Adults, Baptist 
Retirement Homes expanded its 
nursing services in 1994 to include 
an additional 100 Older Adults 
(80% of that group being classified 
as the poor elderly . . . men and 
women who lack sufficient financial 
resources to pay for the 
institutional services they receive). 

Thank you North Carolina Baptists for 
helping us make life for Older Adults . . . 
The Best of Times! 



-29- 



I 

i 



I 



Meeting the 
Challenges of 
Health Care 

1994 



J\eport to 

the Associations 




'Touching Lives With Hope' 



pounded in 1922, Baptist 
Hospital is a missionan enterprise 
of the Baptist churches of North 
Carolina. The essence of our pur- 
pose is to earn out a ministiy of 
healing as taught by Jesus Christ. 
We remain as fidly committed to this 
mission as were our founding 
fathers. In the midst of changing 
health-care norms, we have not. nor 
will we, deviate from this mission. 
The following paragraphs report, 
not only basic facts, but various 
results of how we have sought in 
the last year to remain true to our 
heritage while providing quality 
health care at affordable prices. 



PROVIDERS AND RECIPIENTS OF HEALING 

Our Hospital healing team now consists of 5,777 employees. The Medical 
Center (North Carolina Baptist Hospital and Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine) personnel total employment is fast approaching 9.000 people 
making us the second largest employer in Forsyth County. In our 806-bed 
facility, we had 23,545 inpatient admissions during our fiscal year 1993-94. 
Our Outpatient Department, physicians' clinics, and other related depart- 
ments received 523,672 patient visits. 

DEPARTMENT OF PASTORAL CARE 

Our chaplaincy division joins with our health-care professionals to pro- 
vide spiritual and emotional healing. With 15 to 35 chaplains present at 
various times, 58,747 ministries were provided to patients, families, staff 
and groups. Mission dollars from the Cooperative Program enabled this 
ministry to be carried out. 

The Center for Congregational Health, in its second year of ministry 
as a part of our Department of Pastoral Care, continues to expand and 
strengthen. To date thru 1993, 40 ministers have completed intentional 
interim training and 29 are in training. The number of churches calling 
intentional interim pastors continues to increase. The training of consult- 
ants for conflicted churches and leadership training for young ministers 
were both begun. 

The Pastoral Counseling Division now operates 12 counseling centers 
across the state. These centers provided 26,716 hours, a five percent 
increase over the previous year. 

In December 1994, Dr. Dewey Hobbs will retire as Director of the 
Department of Pastoral Care. His eleven years of leadership and ministry 
have brought quality and expansion in every facet of the department. 

BAPTIST BENEVOLENT CARE FUND 

Last year Baptists across our state gave $425,734 to our annual Mother's 
Day Offering. .Ml of these monies went toward relieving the financial 
burden of scores of former patients who have little or no health-care 
insurance and no financial means to pay their hospital bills. The churches 
and individuals help make this ministry possible and we are grateful. 



J o 



1 n 



B 



a p t 1 
-30- 



H o 



1 t 



1 s. 



I n c. 



EXCELLENT FINANCIAL STEWARDSHIP 

In the midst of escalating health-care costs, we have a proven 
record of superb stewardship. 

( 1 ) The latest report of the North Carolina Database Commission 
comparing the average of other state academic medical 
center charges vs. Baptist Hospital for our most frequent 
diagnoses reveals our charges are 21% lower. 

(2) We are one of only 17 hospitals nationally with a "AA" 
bond credit rating. 

(3) Averaging the last two years and the projection for 1994, 
the Consumer Price Index will average 2.8% and the 
Medical CPI for hospitals will average 8.9%. Baptist 
Hospital rate increases for the same period will average 
1.8%, under both the above-mentioned indexes. 

MEETING THE CHALLENGES OF THE FUTURE 

The health care environment is and will continued to be 
changing. Baptist Hospital is proactively facing these changes 
on a daily basis. Below are listed several visions which have 
recently been or will soon be realized. 

Nursing Center at Oak Summit 

Opened in July 1993 this 170-bed facility offers four levels 
of care. It is also one of only a few nursing centers in North 
Carolina that provides care for ventilator-dependent patients. 

Emergency Department/Dietary Building 

Progressing toward a late 1995 opening, this facility will ex- 
pand our ED capacity to 70,000 visits annually. It will also house 
three floors of patient private rooms, our Pharmacy Department, 
a new kitchen and 900-seat cafeteria, and a 35-bed Day Hospital. 

J. Paul Sticht Center on Aging and Rehabilitation 

This building will usher in a new era in rehabilitation at our 
Medical Center. Housing a total of 128 beds, it will contain a 
geriatric day hospital which will aid the transition from hospital 
to home, inpatient rehabilitation nursing units, a psychiatric 
floor, geriatric research and education. Completion is targeted 
for 1996. 



therapy and pain management. Home Health Specialists provides 
nursing care, personal care and physical and occupational therapy. 

Center for Research on Human Nutrition and Chronic 
Disease Prevention 

Our continued partnership with Bowman Gray School of Medi- 
cine enables our Medical Center to provide the highest quality 
of research, education, and patient care. Quoting Dean Richard 
Janeway, "We are trying to prevent the major killers such as 
cancer, strokes, and heart attacks. With this facility we'll be able 
to transfer the infonnation straight to the patient's bedside." 

COMMUNITY HOSPITAL ASSISTANCE 

Developing relationships with community hospitals such as 
Stokes Reynolds in Danbury and Hoots Hospital in Yadkinville 
enables us to assist them in lowering costs as well as providing 
quality hospital and outpatient care. We anticipate expanding 
this endeavor to include other smaller, outlying hospitals. We 
also have significant affiliate relationships with hospitals in 
Wilkesboro, Lexington, and Mt. Airy and are in the process of 
developing other affiliate relationships. 

QUALCHOICE OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Joining with BGSM and Wake Forest University, Baptist 
Hospital has developed a managed care plan. Our design is one 
which offers affordable quality health care while providing the 
insured freedom of choice. This plan will be opened for public 
enrollment beginning January 1, 1995. 

A CLOSING WORD 

We continue to esteem our heritage, celebrate our current 
capabilities, and strive to position ourselves for the future. Your 
partnership, prayers, and utilization of our services inspires our 
dedication to our mission. We are grateful to God and to the 
North Carolina Baptist family. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Len B. Preslar, Jr. 




President 



At home health care 

Our Home Health Solutions provides our local region with 
parenteral nutrition and intravenous antibiotic theraov. chemo- 



The North Carolma Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated 

-31- 



" Touching Lives With Hope" 




Gardner^bb 



UNIVERSITY 



SCHOOL 




Thank you for the interest, prayer and support as we have begun the Gardner- Webb 
University School of Divinity. Let me report our progress to this point by answering the 
questions we are most often asked. 

WKof 15 a School of Divinity? 1$ it purely academic in contrast to the professiorud education offered 
hy seminaries? 

Our purpose is to provide professional education for Christian ministry in a local church. We also help student min- 
isters shape their ministry through courses such as models for ministry, Christian spirituality and religion and personality. 
Each student meets regularly with a mentor/ teacher. We also offer courses in professional areas such as preaching, teaching, 
worship leadenhip, church administration, organizational leadership, counseling, evangelism and pastoral care. You can see 
that we balance classical disciplines with knowledge of practical church leadership and continued penonal spiritual growth. 

The name "School of Divinity" is usually used when ministerial education is offered by a university. The word "sem- 
inary" usually describes a free-standing institution. 

Why offer ministerial education in a university? 

As a university affiliated with the North Carolina Baptist State Convention, we can provide an excellent ministeri- 
al education based on historic Baptist principles. From the beginning we can enjoy the resources of the university such as the 
programs for the deaf and/or blind students, and masten level studies in other areas such as psychology and business. 

How many students do you have? 

The School of Divinity is off to a good start. The first semester (Spring 1993) we enrolled 23 students. The fall and 
spring semesters of our first full year we had 51 students. Projections for enrollment for die fall indicate that we will contin- 
ue to grow. 

Who are your teachers? 

Faculty members with long experience such as Dr. Donald E. Cook in New Testament, Dr. Roy B. Wyatt in Old 
Testament, and Dr. Robert Lamb in church administration form a core full-time faculty. Dr. Albert Meiburg directs Clinical 
Pastoral Education. Other faculty from the university and from churches and agencies along witti missionaries in residence 
also teach. 

How are you doing financially? 

The strength of the university has helped us launch the School of Divinity. We are grateful for the Theological 
Education Grants the Baptist State Convention ot North Carolina has made available. Many churches and individuals have 
helped us. The Christian Service Organization is engaged in a drive to secure additional scholarships. 

WKere do you stand theologically? 

We take the bible seriously, believing its message about sin, salvation and grace should he applied to every aspect of 
life. We take a traditional, inclusive Baprist approach, welcoming both men and women who answer God's call to prepare 



with us. 



Please call 1-800-619-3761 for additional information 

-32- 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST FOUNDATION, INC 
ANNUAL REPORT TO BAPTIST ASSOCIATIONS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

June, 1994 



Income Distributions 

1920-1993 



8,000,000 
7,000,000 
6,000,000 
5,000,000 
4,000,000 
3,000,000 
2,000,000 
1,000,000 





1920-1978 1979-1981 1982-1984 1985-1987 1988-1990 1991-1993 



To Baptist causes □ To individuals 



With the 75th anniversary of the chartering of 
the N. C. Baptist Foundation approaching, it is 
exciting to reflect on the falfillment of dreams of the 
founding fathers. The prayerful deliberation that led to 
the vote in the 1919 Baptist State Convention meeting 
for the beginning of "a trust agency" envisioned a 
viable entity which would promote and manage funds 
given by individuals for perpetual suppon of several 
struggling instimtions and the mission programs at the 
heart of this missionary minded denomination. 

As of December 3 1 , 1993, the Foundation held 
$45,878,748 under management. In 1993. $1,243,217 
was distributed to Baptist work and $1,196,748 was 
distributed to individuals for a total income distribution 
of $2,439,965. 

The income distributions for the entire 74 year 
history of the N. C. Baptist Foundation totals: 
$7,009,154 income paid to individuals and 



$10,011,893 to Baptist churches, instimtions and 
mission causes for a grand historical total of 
$17,021,047. 

In 1993, the staff of the Foundation consisted 
of seven full time employees and two persons who 
provided pan-time service in accounting and legal 
services. In May of 1994, Rev. Coy H. Jeans, Jr. was 
employed by the Foundation Board as Western Area 
Manager of Trust and Endowment Development. Rev. 
Jeans will serve individuals in western North Carolina 
through estate stewardship planning to better provide 
for families and Christian endeavors. He will also 
work very closely with Associations and churches in 
the area. We encourage western North Carolina 
Baptists to contact Rev. Jeans at his office in Marion 
at 704-652-9548. The Foundation's main office is 
located at 201 Convention Drive, Cary, N. C. 27511. 
telephone 919-380-7334. 



-33- 



COOPERATIVE PROGRAM 



Today, Southern Baptist working together are doing God's 
work through the Coioperative Program. 

Gifts through the Cooperative Program's plan of doing God's 
work support some 9,000 missionaries and thousands of 
ministrires around the world. 

We support educations institutions, Children's Homes, Homes 
for the elderly and out Baptist Hospitals. We also 
broadcast the gospel on radio and television. We publish 
state papers, church literature and books. We minister 
through home, state and foreign missions. 

Everytime we give through our churches and our churches give 
through the Cooperative Program, we have a part in spreading 
the gospel around the world. 



Pauline Berry 



-34- 



STATE MISSIOtiS 



PERCENTAGE 
OF MINISTRY 
& PROGRAM 
BUDGETS 
SUPPORTED BY 
NC MISSIONS 
OFFERING: 

88% of Womans 
Missionary Union of 
NC; 

56% of NC Baptist 
Men (Brotherhood); 

47% of Mission 
Ministries (includes 
66% of all Language 
Missions and 50% of 
new church starts and 
ministries); and 

44% of Youth and 
Campus Ministries 
(local BSU Centers 
and projects). 



Because of the North 
Carolina Missions Offering, 
millions of people find the help 
and hope that so often eludes them in 
the world today. Prisoners are visited, 

homeless people are fed, poor people 
receive medical care— and all experience 
firsthand the love of Christ, Your gift 
to this special offering makes it 
possible to share Christ with 
North Carolinay one per- 
son at a time. 



•Gherokee ministries 
•Christian Action League 
•Christian High Adventure 

(backpacking program) 
•Church growth assistance 
•City/urban missions assistance 
•Cooperative ministries with General 

Baptists 
•Day care ministries assistance 
•Disaster Relief missions 
•Ethnic leadership development 
•European refugee resetdement 
•Fruitland Baptist 
Bible Instimte 
• Gifts to 
missionary 
£unilies 



REPORT OF CHURCH GROWTH MULTIPLIERS 
TO ASSOCIATIONS IN REGIONS 7, 8, 9, & 10 

and Woman's Missionary Union. 

:^^ran:%%°';.:iP chirches"tha"t' are pfateaued and/or decUnlns to 
grow through the Sunday School. 



be much in prayer 
If we can be of 
us . 



We ask those of you who read this report to 

Respectfully submitted, 
Rev. Fred B. Lunsford 
Team Leader 



Rev. Fred B. Lunsford 
Rt . 1, Box 72 
Marble, NC 28905 
704-837-2605 



Helen Allan 
PO Box 372 
Ridgecrest, NO 
7 4 •v. 9 i S 5 3 



28770 



Martha E. Hicks 

bo Sulphur Springs Rd 

Asheville, NC 28806 

704-252-1257 

Mabel Couch 
143 Wilkes St 
Elkin, NC 28621 
910-526-2208 



Miss Sharon Kephart 
Rt . 3, Box 227 
Murphy, NC 28906 
704-837-6530 



J 1 m CI ouse 
Rt . 2, Box 256 
Hendersonvi lie, 
704-685- 3892 



NC 28792 



Suthell Walker 
202 Bf^rtley St 
Spindale, NC 28160 
704-286-2737 



-36- 



Baptist Children's Homes of North Carolina 

Michael C. Blackwell, President 



No matter how much adults try to 
convince themselves otherwise, 
children suffer when parents 
divorce. 
Amber suffered. Because 
she blamed her mother for 
household turmoil, and because she was young 
and confused. Amber told her mother she hated 
her. She stopped communicating and became 
withdrawn. She chose wrong friends and at- 
tempted to take her own life. 

In today's atmosphere, when divorce rocks 
as many marriages as it misses, thousands of 
children like Amber look for anchors. And in 
today's atmosphere, just as in the atmosphere of 
the 1880s, and every year since. Baptist Children's 
Homes provides that anchor for hundreds of 
children. 

In 1992-93 BCH served 
1,469 young people and their 
families, probably an all- 
time high. 

Through services pro- 
vided at 13 facilities state- 
wide, BCH offered residen- 
tial care, maternity care, a 
home for teenage mothers 
and their babies, therapeutic 
camping, model day care, emergency care and 
behavioral change. 

Through the Cooperative Program, church 
budgets and the Thanksgiving Offering, Baptist 
churches provided about one-third of the $11 
million necessary to care for those children . 
Other revenue comes from payment for services 
on a sliding scale, foundations and corporations 
and individual gifts. A significant source of help 
comes from individuals who remember Baptist 



"I'm glad 

people support 

this place because 

there's a lot of 

kids who need it." 

-Amber 




Children's Homes, and the chil- 
dren it serves, in their estate 
planning. 

"I couldn't 
handle what was 
going on at 
home," Amber 
said, after a year in 
the intensive group 
process at Kennedy 

Home. "\ wanted a way out. I saw (suicide) as the 
only way. I had totally turned my back on God." 

Under the tutelage of Kennedy Home Baptist 
Church's pastor. Amber has rededicated her life 
to the Lord and was baptized. She is now memo- 
rizing Scripture and doing devotions. 

Between her renewed faith and the peer 
group process. Amber has begun to resolve the 
differences with her mother. When she graduates 
from Kennedy Home, she plans to live with her 
mother and sister. 

'7ust being able to talk through it with group 
and with staff helped make it better," Amber said. 
"They helped me understand mom may have 
moved out, but she never left me. She's always 
been supportive." 

Working through problems at BCH involves 
identifying your problems, putting a name to 
them. That helps a child realize he/ she is not a 
"problem child" but is a "child with problems." 

'If I was alive without this place, I wouldn't 
be in a happy life," Amber said. "I'm really 
thankful there are places like this. 

Amber's gratitude expresses the feelings of 
himdreds of children each year, and the staff who 
serves them. Many young people need BCH. 
Thankfully, many Baptist adults are committed 
to providing their needs, for Jesus' sake. 



-37- 



i 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION REPORT 



All five of our churches in the association that have a WMU 
organization have been very busy over the past year. I am very 
proud of the work that has been done in each community, each local 
church and around the world through these ladies. 

We are all committed to seeing that the "Good News" is spread to 
all parts of the world, but we are also aware that we have to begin 
at home . 

I have compiled the information sent to me by each church below. 
You can see our ladies have really been involved in the work they 
were called to do. 

Bailey's Camp promoted Home Missions and Foreign Missions in 
support of their church. Special mission projects included mild of 
pennies for the Children's Homes, an angel tree and a gift for a 
needy person. 

Laytown has a special project - every third Saturday they take 
supper to Hospice for the families. When there is a death in the 
church, they take food for the families. A special project in 
support of the church is cooking breakfast and supper at the church 
for the wagon train two times a year. The wagon train then makes 
a donation to the church for the building fund. They also give a 
love offering to the graduates. This year they sold tickets for a 
glider chair and obtained Stanley orders to raise money for Willie 
Kanupp to go to Russia. They also promote the Annie Armstrong and 
Lottie Moon offerings and raise money with bake sales and Stanley 
orders . 

Long Ridge's special project was a spaghetti supper and the 
raffling of a quilt to raise money for improvement of the 
fellowship hall and to provide fruit baskets for the elderly. They 
also brought tables for the church. They sold calendars to raise 
extra money. 

Rock Spring - special project has been to help a neighbor with 
cancer and heart trouble. They have purchased gifts for church 
members on their birthdays and fruit baskets for the elderly. The 
support the Lottie Moon and Annie Armstrong offerings through the 
church and also take up an offering for the hungry each month. 
They try to work on a different project each month. They support 
our associational missions by giving money for the special mission 
trips to Brazil and New York. 

Sandy Flat's special project was to make lap robes for patients in 
the Extended Care Facility of the hospital. They also provided 
food for a neighbor who was injured in a car accident and unable to 
work for a long period of time. They had a speaker from Mills Home 
come portray Lottie Moon. Projects in support of the church 
included promoting offerings for State Missions, Annie Armstrong 



and Lottie Moon. At Thanksgiving they had the children from the 
cottage the church supports come for lunch and give them the food 
collected for them. This year they are trying something new - they 
have contacted a missionary in Benin and are writing to her. They 
will try to be personally involved in providing the needs of the 
people in the village the missionary is serving to try to make a 
difference in their lives. A special mission project was to send 
money to resort ministries to be used as needed. 

I am so appreciative of all the work being done by our 
associational WMU and would like to take this opportunity to thank 
each of our members for their support and caring and for the work 
they are doing to tell of Jesus' love for a lost world. 

Our church WMU directors are: Bailey Camp - Barbara West, Laytown 
- Deborah Walsh, Long Ridge - Kathy McCoury, Rock Spring - Frankie 
Hendrix, Sandy Flat - Linda Mills. 



Linda Mills 

Assoc. WMU Director 



-39- 



DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING 



The associational discipleship training goal in the Stony Fork 
Association is to serve as a support system for the discipling 
effort of the local church. Those serving in associational 
discipleship leadership do so in order to encourage and assist the 
churches, to discover discipling needs, determine strategies to 
meet those needs, and make every effort to provide for the 
spiritual progression of the people. 

Our goal is to begin new discipling processes and to strengthen 
existing growth options. 

The associational discipleship supporters team is as follows: 
Charles Craig, Rick Turbyfill, Edith Gryder, Linda Mills and Mamie 
Craig. 



Mrs. Mabel Couch spoke to this report. 



Charles Craig 



-40- 




CHRISTIAN ACTION LEAGUE OF NORTH CAROUNA, 




6339 GLENWOOD AVE./BOX 550 - RALEIGH. NORTH CAROLINA 27612 



C5ffc« Phon«: 

787-0606 
Ai*a 919 



REPORT TO THE ASSOCIATION 
1 994 



Can God's people make a difference concerning the moral 
climate of our state? There is no doubt about it! The $300 
billion gambling industry has targeted our state for 
legalized gambling. Why North Carolina? The fact is that N.C. 
is the largest state in the nation where the gambling 
industry has not been able to get their foot in the door. 
Furthermore, NC is the only state in the traditional Bible- 
belt where the gambling industry has not been able to make 
any inroads. In order to get their legislation enacted, they 
hired 14 of the most influential and effective lobbyists that 
money can buy to sell "their bill of goods" to the members of 
the N.C. General Assembly. 

Is there anyway to defeat such money and power? Yes! 
Through the prayers and influence of God s people! It 
happened in 1994! 

The legislature has adjourned - the members have gone 
home - the gambling lobbyists have packed their bags and left 
town . 

How was it done? Baptists and other Christians fulfilled 
their Biblical responsibilities by influencing their 
legislators through their prayers, letters, phone calls, and 
personal contacts. 

The Christian Action League along with the Christian 
Life Council of the Baptist State Convention; N.C. Baptist 
Men; and Woman's Missionary Union, has conducted 36 
workshops, THE CHRISTIAN LOOKS AT GAMBLING, to educate and 
motivate our people into action against this insidious evil. 
You responded, and now, we can claim the victory. 

Furthermore, when communities like Asheboro, Albemarle, 
Concord, Kannapolis, Thomasvilie, and Manteo, including Hyde 
and Harnett Counties, faced battles with the powerful $140 
billion dollar liquor industry during the year, we were 
delighted to provide campaign strategy, research documents, 
and publicity materials. The liquor forces did not win any of 
these referendums. 

We thank God for your support of our Ministry of Applied 
Christianity, and we stand ready to assist God's people in 
being the "salt" and "light" that He would have us be. 



Coy^ C . PVivette 
Executive Director 




OFFICIAL PUBLCATON -TOMORnOW 
AFFILIATED 

AMERICAN COUNCIL ON ALCOHOL PROBLEMS 
AMERICAN FAMILY ASSOCIATION 

-41- 



Stewardship Report 
for 

STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Annual Meeting 
August 13, 1994 



WHAT HAPPENS TO UNPROFITABLE SERVANTS? 

Read with me if you will from St. Matthews gospel, 
chapter 24, verses 14 through 30. This parable of contrasts 
that Jesus tells us here helps us to know the responsibility 
that each of us holds to use the talents that God has 
entrusted to us wisely and productively. Lets, in our minds 
move this story from there and then to here and now. 

We in the Stoney Fork Association have for so long said 
that we are not able to do the things we know need to be done 
because of lack of funds. Sadly, for many years this was a 
valid reason for not having reached beyond the shadow of our 
own church steeples. Too many times we have had to watch as 
opportunities to reach out to those around us have slipped 
away for lack of a few dollars. 

I hope that the valid reason of the past has not become 
the lame excuse of the present. We can see by the annual 
financial report that all of our churches have consistently 
and generously provided financial support to the Association. 
The Association has allocated funds to help us do the work we 
were responsible for. But too many of the allocations have 
gone unused. Let us take caution that we do not become like 
the "wicked and slothful servant" who out of fear of failure 
did nothing. 

Lets look back now at the question posed in the title. 
What does happen to unprofitable servants? As born again 
Christians we do not have to fear the fate of being "cast 
into outer darkness" as the servant in the parable but do we 
place the souls of those we might reach for Jesus in danger 
of such a fate? None of us can begin to predict the results 
of our actions. However, it is easier to see that our 
inaction can lead to disaster. 

This is a plea to all of us that we that we stop leaning 
on our old lame excuses and start looking for opportunities 
to get gain for our Master. Then we will have earned the 
trust our church members have placed in us . 



Respectfully submitted 
Roy Gryder 



-42- 



RESOLUTIONS 



Let it be resolved that the Stony Fork Association expresses 
its thanks and appreciation to the Rock Spring and Sandy- 
Flat Baptist Churches for their hospitality and delicious 
food. 

We would also like to express our thanks to God for the 
wonderful Christian fellowship and the excellent reports and 
speakers we have heard over the past two days. 



Betty Woods 



OBITUARIES 

Doe Ridge Venie Moretz 

Laytown Mr. Arirl Coffey 

Sandy Flat Mrs. Beulah Shore 

MESSENGERS TO THE ASSOCIATIONAL 
ANNUAL MEETING 



Bailey Camp Edith Gryder 

Roy Gryder 
Max West 
Barbara West 
Robyn West 

Doe Ridge Junior Eldreth 

Pauline Eldreth 

Rev. Arvil Hardy 

Larry Presnell 

Dennis Presnell 
Celebrated 100th year anniversary July 31, 1994 

Laytown Rev. Rick Turbyfill 

Mr. Roy Kanupp 

Mrs. Vera Dula 

Mr. Charles Smity 
Saw a need for a fellowship hall and the land was donated 
Henry and Gail Layer and Mrs. Joan Propst. We had a fund 
raiser which was a good start. 

Long Ridge Roy Woodie 

Richard Clark 
John McCoury 
David Anthony 

Rock Spring Betty Woods 

Carroll Woods 
Ron Burgett 

Sandy Flat Linda Mills 

Mamie Craig 
Nellie Coffey 
Eunice Luttrell 
Doris Tester 



-44- 



^'1 



I 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



Yejr 


Churches 


Moderator 


Clerk 


Preacher 


1862 


2ions C4te Mceiin| 










HouM. WilketCo. 


Larkin Hodges 


Larkin Pipes 


Elder Larkin Hodg 


1863 


Yellow Hill 


Larkin Hodges 


Larkin Pipes 


Wilson Bradshaw 


1864 


Minutct were noi primed, tntnunnpi |oi lost. 






186S 


Mt Ephri^m 


Larkin Hodges 


|. R. HoiJges 


loseph Harrison 


1866 


South Kork 


Larkin Hodges 


Eliiah Trivetl 


Larkin Hodges 


1867 ^ 


Wrft jufi 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


|. R. Carlton 


1868 ' 


Union 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


lames Parsons 


1869 


Stony f'Ork 


Larkin Hodges 


tames Parsons 


W. H. Phillips 


1870 


Old f leld 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


William Wilcox 


1871 


Elk 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


lames Parsons 


1872 


Ml. Vernon 


Larkin Hodges 


lames Parsons 


|. R. Carlton 


1873 


Watiufa 


Larkin Hodges 


James Parsons 


Larkin Hodges 


1874 


Yellow Hill 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


lames Parsons 


1875 


Laurel Fork 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


Levi Wilson 


1876 


Stony Fork 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


Larkin Hodges 


1877 


Poplar Grove 


Larkin Hodges 


Elijah Trivett 


lames Parsons 


1878 


Old Field 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


|. R. Carlton 


1879 


Elk 


Larkin Hodges 


William t. Greene 


Monroe Gragg 


1880 


Mt. Vernon 


Larkin Hodges 


William E. Greene 


Monroe Gragg 


1881 


Waiaufa 


Larkin Hodges 


Elijah Trivett 


Levi Wilson 


1882 


Mt. Ephriam 


). F. Eller 


John R. Hodges 


lames Parsons 


1883 


Y How Hill 


|. F. Eller 


Elijah Trivetl 


Larkin Hodges 


1884 


Boones Fork 


Larkin Hodges 


Thomas Pipes 


Larkin Pipes 


188S 


Buffalo Cove 


|. F. Eller 


Thomas Pipes 


|. F. Eller 


1886 


Stony Fork 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm.M. Lee 


E. M. Gragg 


1887 


Union 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


David Eller 


1888 


Laurel Fork 


lames Parsons 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1889 


Poplar Grove 


F. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


|ohn F. Eller 


1890 


Mt. Vernon 


E.M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


E. M. Gragg 


189V 


Watauga 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1892 


Mt. Paran 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


E. M. Gragg 


1893 


Boones Fork 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


S. T.Carroll 


1894 


Yellow Hill 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


lohn F. Eller 


1895 


New River 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


Geo. W. Trivett 


1896 


Elk 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1897 


Laurel Fork 


E. M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1898 


Buffalo Co7e 


). C.Miller 


Wm. M. Lee 


j. F. Davis 


1899 


Mt. Vernon 


E. M. Gragg 


R. H. Pipes 


|. 1. 1. Sherwood 


1900 


Watauga 


E.M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


0. C. Harmart 


1901 


Stony Fork 


I.e. Miller 


Wm. M. Lee 


|ohn Crisp 


1902 


Poplar Grove 


I.e. Miller 


A. |. Shull 


|. C. Blaylock 


1903 


Boones Fork 


F.M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1904 


Ml. Ephriam 


F.M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


F. M. Gragg 


1905 


Mt. Paran 


E.M. Gragg 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1906 


Yellow Hill 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


Asa Brown 


1907 


New River 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


|. F. Davis 


1908 


Middle Cane 


lames F. Church 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1909 


Elk 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1910 


Laurel Fork 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1911 


Mt. Vernon 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


D. M. Wheeler 


1912 


Poplar Grove 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


R. F. Wilcox 


1913 


Watauga 


Thos. L. Day 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1914 


Mt. Ephriam 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1915 


Boones Fork 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Let 


D. M. Wheeler 


1916 


Rock Springs 


B. F. Wilcox 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1917 


Ml. Paran 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1918 


Out 10 the outbreak ol 


influrn/a no Association was held 






1919 


Yellow Hill 


B.F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


B. F. Wilcox 


1920 


Mt. Vernoo 


B.F. Wilcox 


N, S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1921 


Laurel Fork 


B. F . Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


D. M. Wheeler 


1922 


Waiauga 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


Oscar Dellinger 


1923 


Poplar Gruve 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1924 


Boones ^ ork 


B. F. Wilcox 


1 . Amos Hampton 


W. D. Ashley 


1925 


Ml . E phf nm 


B I- . Wikox 


1 . Amos Hjmpion 


|. A. Hampton 


1926 


Rock View 


0. M. Wheeler 


1 . Amos Hampton 


G. M. Watson 



-45- 



1927 Elk 


0. M. Wheeler 


R. F. Wilcox 


A. C. Hamby 


1928 WitixJU 


D. M. Wheeler 


8. F. Wilcox 


B. F. Wilcox 


1929 Sindy Flil 


0. M. Wheeler 


8. F. Wilcox 


G. M. Watson 


1930 Middle Cine 


W. D. Ashley 


B.F.Wilcox 


Linncy Barnes 


1931 Laurel Fork 


W. D. Ashley 


B. F. Wilcox 


8. F. Wilcox 


1932 New Hopewell 


C. M. Watson 


B. F. Wilcox 


|. T. McGuirc 


1933 Yellow Hill 


B. F. Wilcox 


Roy Keller 


G. M. Watson 


1934 Mt. Vernon 


G. W.Gragg 


Roy Keller 


R. H. Shore 


1935 Grandmother Cap 


G. W. Grau 


Roy Keller 


W. I.Cook 


1936 Mt. Ephriam 


G. W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


Carl Triplet! 


1937 Mt. View 


B. F. Wilcox 


G. M. Watson 


Raymond Hendrix 


1938 Watauga 


Carl Trtplelt 


F. L. Hampton 


W. 0. Ashley 


1939 Laurel Fork 


Carl Triplelt 


F. L. Hampton 


W. I.Cook 


1940 Bailey Camp 


Carl Triplett 


F. L. Hampton 


C.M.Watson 


1941 Sandy Flat 


Lee 1 . Church 


N. L. Harrison 


Roy Keller 


1942 New Hopewell 


Lee ). Church 


N. L. Harrison 


B. F.Wilcox 


1943 Boones Fork 


Lee 1 . Church 


N. L. Harrison 


W. 8. Bryant 


1944 Watauga 


N. L. Harrison 


W. M. Brown 


Frank Knighi 


194S Layiown 


N. L. Harrison 


W. M. Brown 


W. 0. Ashley 


1946 Ml. Vernon 


G. M. Watson 


W. M. Brown 


W. D. Ashley 


1947 Yellow Hill 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Watson 


Roscoe Greene 


1948 No Minutes, Manuscript 


lost at printers. Held 


with Doe Ridge Church. 




1949 Mt. Paran 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Wauon 


Roscoc Greene 


19S0 Rock Springs 


Theo Hendrix 


N. L. Harrison 


R. L. Barnes 


19S1 New Hopewell 


Theo Hendrix 


N. L. Harrison 


Barney Oliver 


1952 Boones Fork 


G. M. Watson 


|. Merrill Coffey 


W. I.Cook 


19S3 East Flats 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Wauon 


R. L. Barnes 


1954 Mt. Ephriam 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Watson 


Lloyd I.Oullcr 


1955 Bailey Camp 


Theo Hendrix 


G.M.Watson 


W. I.Cook 


1956 Laurel Fork 


Theo Hendrix 


). Merrill Coffey 


W. M. Brjown 


1957 Mt. Vernon and 








Sandy Flat 


Theo Hendrix 


|. Merrill Coffey * 


W. I.Cook 


1958 Laytown and 








Rock Springs 


Theo Hendrix 


|. Merrill Coffey 


Carson Egscrs 


1959 New Hopewell and 








Long Ridge 


Carson Eggers 


). Merrill Cotfey 


W. I.Cook 


1960 Ml. Paran and 








Boones Fork 


Carson Eggers 


|. Merrill Coffey 


Wendell Critcher 


1961 Watauga and 








Yellow Hill 


Carson Eggers 


). Merrill Coffey 


Dupree Go wan 


1962 Mt. Ephriam and 








Sandy Flat 


Carson Eggers 


Miss Winifred Hampton 


Roby McNeil 


1963 Doe Ridge and 








Rock Springs 


Carson Eggers 


Miss Winifred Hampton 


W. M. Brown 


1964 Bailey s Camp 


E. 0. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Siorie 


Wm. Quinn 


Boones Fork 


E. O. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storic 




1965 Laurel Fork 


E. O. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Siorie 


W. M. Brown 


Layiown 


E.O. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 




1956 Longridge 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Phillip Martin 


Mt. Paran 


A. C. Moody 


Mrs. Clark Siorie 


Lyie (Pete) Vannoy 


1967 Mt. Vernon 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Basil Tester 


New Hopewell 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


E. 0. Bustle 


1968 Rock Springs 


A. C. Moody 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


A.C.Moody 


Sandy Fiat 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Siorie 


Rayner Matheson 


1969 BailevsCamp 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs. Clark Siorie 


Lewis Hodge 


Boones Fork 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Herring Crisp 


1970 Laurel Fork 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Max West 


David Austin 


Doe Ridge 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Max West 


Archie Clawson 


1971 Laytown 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Raymond Turbyfil 


Longridge 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


SherritI Welbom 


1972 Mt. Ephriam 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Gurncy Robbins 


Mount Paran 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


A. C. Moody 


1973 Mt. Vernon 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max Wcsi 


Evcreiie Watson 


New 1 lope well 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Sherrill Welbom 


1974 Rock Springs 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Merle |ohnson 


Sandy Flat 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Dale Milstead 


1975 Yellow Hill 


Merle |ohnson 


Mrs. Max West 


Dean Hodges 


Bailey's Camp 


Merle fohnson 


Mrs. Max West 


Max West 


1976 Boones Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara Wesi 


A.C. Moody 


Doe Ridge 






Lloyd Hoilman 


1977 Laurel Fork 


Cha/lcs Craig 


. Barbara West 


Raymond Hendrix 


Laytown 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Max West 



-46- 



1978 


Long Ridge 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Philip Martin 




Mt. Ephraim 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


A . C . Moody 


1979 


Mount Vernon 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Bean 




Boone Fork 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Danner 


1980 


Mt . Paron 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 




New Hopewell 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 


1981 


Rock Spring 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cannon Ward 




Sandy Flat 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 


1982 


Watauga 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jack White 




Bailey Camp 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cecil Gragg 


1983 


Boone Fork 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 




Doe Ridge 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


J.R. Robbins 


1984 


Laurel Fork 


Jack White 


Linda 


Mills 


Jack White 




Laytown 


Jack White 


Linda 


Mills 


Ed Greene 


1985 


Long Ridge 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Scott Church 




Mt. Ephraim 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Ed Greene 


1986 


Rock Spring 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Scott Church 




Sandy Flat 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Max West 


1987 


Bailey's Camp 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Greg Math is 




Boone Fork 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Everette Little 


1988 


Doe Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda 


Mills 


Kenneth Ridings 




Laytown 


Scott Church 


Linda 


Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1989 


Long Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda 


Mills 


Alex Booth 




Mt. Ephraim 


Scott Church 


Linda 


Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1990 


Rock Spring 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Scott Church 




Sandy Flat 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Max West 


1991 


Bailey's Camp 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Jimmy Hubbard 




Boone Fork 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Eugene Fillers 


1992 


Doe Ridge 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Arville Hardy 




Laytown 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Dennis Geouge 


1993 


Long Ridge 


Max West 


Linda 


Mills 


John McCoury 




Mt . Ephraim 


Max West 


Linda 


Mills 


Sherrill Dunn 


1994 


Rock Spring 


Max West 


Linda 


Mills 


Richard Baird 




Sandy Flat 


Max West 


Linda 


Mills 


Leon Silver 



The churches/ Buffalo Cove, Cool Springs/ Wilkes County Elk, Stony Fork, and Yellow 
Hill, formerly belonging to other associations. 

Met at the Stony Fork Baptist Church and organized the Stony Fork Baptist Association 
on November 9th. and 10th., 1880. For this meeting appointed Elder Larkin Hodges, 
Moderator and Brother Elijah Trivette/ Clerk. 



-47- 



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OS 

:^ 

><: 

CQ 

I 
% 

i 


3 

i 


8 

^« 

n 
1 

m 
0- 

- v3 




































_i 
< 




cn 
111 

5 

X 




cr. 
->- 

5 


a 
0) 


3 

c 

i 




-J 


4 


2 










































1 



i 



OD 


qnio eicre (UBAipeg 




























































a 


looyos ewia uouboba 


<^ 




Q 



(^) 






0- 
ro 










































uBA/sng looyos Aepuns 










Q 














































(D 


siinpv , 
9|6uis jooips Aepung 


























































if) 


siuepnis 
eBeiioQ looqos Aepung 








Q) 

















































■*r 


jooyos Aepung «eN 


Q 








Q 









































<^ 




CO 


souepueuv |00l|OS 
Aepung A|>t99AA 96ej9Av 


<^ 







T> 


> 


c< 

V-) 










































E 


Apms eiqia 6uio6uo iemo 


Q 







Q 






VJ 








































t\i 


sjeoiHO lejeueo 
















> 




































_ 




OJ 


Iu9uj||0ju3 punoqaujOH 













Q 













































lueiu||0JU3 Aemv siinpv 


























































c\j 


iueuj||0iu3 
uoiiEOnpg iBiDeds 






Q 






Q 













































(JSAO PUE 99) 

lueuj||aiu3 iinpv JOiues 









V) 















































cy 


(SJB8A w-SE) 
lueuj||0JU3 ijnpy 




\o 






Q 








































N 




2 


(SJBOA f£-92j 
|ueui||0JU3 iinpv ounoA 




c 




> 














































<s 
ry 


PBjB s H k) sjA ej-gi) 
iueiuiiOiu3 iinpv ouno^ 


n 

















































In 




■D 
cy 


iZi i SapBiO JO SJB9A Jl) 

lueujiioiu^ mno\ 



















































Vn 




cvj 


(9- 1 sepejB jo sjbbA 11-9) 
lueuj||0JU3 uejpimo 




Q 


















































J3 
CNJ 


(SJBsA 9 gSnojLii uuig) 
lueLU||0ju3 jooqosejd 




















































Cr 




(0 

CJ 


(sjeeA 2 oi ^v\Q) 
|u8ui||0JU3 i|Ou eipBJO 


— 


V) 


Q 








c> 








































CJ 


lueuj||0JU3 
100405 ABpuns lEiox 




V) 




> 




? 


rr- 








































TABLE B SUNDAY SCHOOL INFORMATION YEAR ENDING 1 994 


(0 
Q 

!^ 

J 



il 

u 

< 



c 

in 


Assodabonal Sunday School Director 


Q. 

isi v3 

«, 

p5 

5i V 
1. 


SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


u 


<^ 

7 

V 



c 
c 

0- 

_^ 
-J 


u 

-3- 

; 
a 
—A 

r? 
Q 

• 00 

X 

• <;> 


• 

- 


v3 

I. 
2 

1 
C 


:j 


-J 

_5 

<Q 

1 


■ rn 


■ 6 




































in 

< 


t- 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


V7 
> 

^^ 
1^ 


05 
X 
X 
X 




a 
a; 

J/ 
1 


A 
4) 

c 


-2 
3 






2 

c 

%- 

■ J. 




-' 







































asuepuanv Sunjiejx 
dHjsMDsiQ XpteeM afiejaAv 


















































^ ^ 




o 
rg 


6u)uieji diMS8|di3S!Q jemo 



















































O 




o" 


uoddns 3dn 




Q 





















































3dn 




O 


















































o 


einaidiosiQ 





o 














































o 




o> 
o 

OJ 


Xprns suuiooQ isiideg 
























































o 

CO 


6u)uiejx 
jequjet^ qojmjo mbn 




Q) 
















































1 


OJ 


lueujiioju^ 

SJ80IHO IBjauBQ 






















































■o 
o 

OJ 


(J9A0 PUB 91) 

lueuj||0JU3 ijnpv 




o- 














































I/) 




8 


iZi i sepBjB JO sjeeA n-zi) 
lueuj||0JU3 MfiOA 






















































8 

OJ 


(9-1. sepBjS JO sjA 1 1-9) 
lu8mi|0JU3 uejpimo 






















































«J 
o 


(jepun puB sjBsA g) 

)UdLU||OJU^ jOOLJOSSJ^ 




o 



















































o 

cy 


uoiiedpiLiBcl/iueiuiioJug 
QuiuiBJx 

dllJS9)dl3SIQ |B10X 




o 














































ro 




TABLE C DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING INFORMATION YEAR ENDING 1994 


o 

oe — 

C 

o . 

fr. 


o 

o 


o 

Q 

vi 
■2. 

ro 

>^ 

o 

=o 

^ 

c , ^ 

1 5 

« 

« 

ft 


Address > ' City 'State Zip 


DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 




o 
<> 

en 

'i 
ro 

O 

o 














































TOTALS 1 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


CHURCHES 


jr 
V 


d: 

















































OJ 
OJ 


lueujiiojug 
etqiuasug leiueujoiisui 


















































v 




c\i 


luaiij|toju9 
eiQLuesug leooA 


Q 





Q 














































CM 
CM 


lu9UJ||0Jug iieqpueH 


o 


Cj 


Q 














































C3» 

CNJ 
OJ 


lueujiioju^ 
jiOLto iinpv joiues 




















































CM 

eg 


(JSAO pue 81) 
iuduj||0ju^ linpv 
















































Co 
Ml 




1 <a 

1 CM 

1 ^ 


[Zi L sepBJfi JO sjeaA ^L-2L) 
lueujiiojug qjnoA 





















































1 'D 
1 CM 
1 CM 


(9f sepBjfi JO sjeeA 1 1 6) 

lU8liJ||0JU3 S,U9JP|IM0 


O 


















































CM 


(C* L sapejS JO SJeeA g-g) 
lueiiJiiojug s.u9jp|iL|3 






O 














































1 

1 ^ 
1 ^ 


(spio jeeA g-t) 
lueuj||0JU9 loogosej^ 


o 


c 

















































1 CM 
1 ^ 


{spio jeeA e) 
iueuj||0JU9 |00L|0S8j(j 






Q 














































CM 


(uemiioju^ 




IT 

<>; 
















































TABLE D MUSIC MINISTRY INFORMATION YEAR ENDING 1994 


o 
2 

A 
o 

2 

1 


d 
1 

■o 

C 

.2 

c3 
55 


-J 

-rT 

« 

I 2 

to "Z 


(/) 

O 

O 

f 

sV) 

1 
< 


MUSIC DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


O 

—a 

£ 

Ui 
"5- 



- 
J 

2 
T 


o 

€ 

— o 
<> 













































TOTALS 1 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


CHURCHES 


•J 

2 

\n 
J. 

V 


C> 

T 

V 


/I 

''7 















































Brotherhood 


sdnojQ uoipv 


o 

\J 







o 

















































uoiiedoiuEd 

S)0@l0J^ SUOlSSI^ 


























































F 


(jeAO puE SJB9A gj) 















o 












































( sjA ce-gi) 










O 















































5 


(Zl-Ol 
sapEjB JO SjA ^i-gi) 

u9^ 6unox 
isiidEg lOOMOS ij6iH 






















































O 




O 
tT 

CM 


(6 i sepEjS 
JO SjeeA fi Zl) 
sjeeuoid 
























































-D 
^ 


(9 f sepBj6 
JO sjeeA u-6) 
sjepEsnjQ 


c 




o 


:r 















































(TJ 
CM 


(E- 1 sepejB 
JO sjeeA 9-9) 
spen 







G 




o 


o 












































U0(iEdOfPEd/lU8UJ|(0JU3 
rwii 1 j(3i iinia iDin i 







c 




o 


c 










































^ 


5 


SJ90IMO nwM 











»o 










































cn 

OJ 


JBAO pUE SE 
U0LiJO/\/\ tSU^BQ 







vn 




o 






































1 




TD 

<M 


(SJB9A qBfKjJLti uoiien 
PBJB SH JO 5JeaA t-e 9L 
uaujOM 6unoA isiideg 










_ 










































m 

OJ 


(21 Z S8pej6 
io SJeeA 
sueepv 


o 




C) 






o 










































OJ 


(9 1 

sepejfi JO sjeeA i i -g) 

SUOIPV Ul SIJIQ 



















































O 




ra 
cn 


(jepun pue sjeaA g) 
spuBu^ uoissiy^ 









o 


■o 


o 












































lueuj||0iU3 


o 






T 


o 


o 






































o 




TABLE E WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION AND BROTHERHOOD INFORMATION YEAR ENDING 1994 


=1 — 
c 

O 1 

J. 

o 
M- 

1^ 
5 \D 
8 


o 

O 


I- 

< 

1 

2 

v: 

< 

c 

i « 
§2 

in 
< 


Associational Brotherhood Director and Address ' 1 


WMU DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 
BROTHERHOOD DIRECTORS S ADDRESSES 


o 

r 
1 

3 

<^ 


J 

2 






21 

m 
t 

O o 


v3 

i 

CD 

o ; 
-rz 


t<i 

i 

o 
'-^ 

IT' 

o; 

& 
J, 


\. 

a 

Co; 

z 

? C 
-Z 2 
































































< 

o 




If) 

X 

} 


Q. 
- 


- 


2. 

3 

o 


0- 
7 




2. 

o 
o 


<£ 











































eg 
tn 


iqep qojnMO 



























































m 


jesA em 
6uijnp psMOjjoq /euoi^ 




<i 





c 




Q 






































Q 




o 
m 


Ausdojd gsjngo |o enieA 


o 

'a 


o 


8 

Vj 


o 
o 
■Q 

C; 
O 


o 


o 

o 

Q 


1 




































t_ 

yi' 
■O 




0) 
CO 


sdjniipuedxe leooi jegio iiv 




toe 
<>- 




> 




N. 

vi 


^a 




































O 

L- 




T3 
00 


ejniejaui qajnyo 


> 




> 


o 

■0 



V. 


-3 
ex. 






































c 






jeeA 

agi 6uunp lueuiejiiej iqaQ 






o 






V^ 


Q 








































g 

CM 


jesA 

aqi 6uunp uoiionjisuoo 
Meu uo ino pted Aeuo^ 








Q 




o 










































■S 


seueiBS HBis yojriMO 








O 

^. 


?r 


> 


c 








































QO 


sjniipuedxe |E00| leioi 




> 










■>! 








































tM 


sidieoej jei4io hv 














o 









































n 


319 

'sSuiiauo '5i|i6 peieuBisaQ 




Q 


C) 

^ 




o 
o 


> 











































ra 

C\J 


o\e sGuusuo 
siiifi psieufiisepufi 




o 




I- 
\n 
















































sidieosu lEiox 




> 


0— 

0- 






T 

3~ 


rJ 
!^ 




































o 




TABLE F FINANCIAL INFORMATION YEAR ENDING 1994 


2 

J. 
(5 O 


Z 
o 

C 


CD ^ 

ici 
1 \ii 


a, 

2 -> 
"o 

o 

O 

f 

V 

fO 


TREASURERS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


c3 

d 
2 

'I 
o 

'=a 
<^ 

O 

Us, 


Oa 
<^ 

w 

; 

c 

' — c 
c 


U 

■ 

o 

d 

■ O 


«o 

i 
_^ 

7 

o 

vl 
C 

- 2 

1 ^ 


Oi 

a 
/ 

O 


3- 

<a 
> 

o 
i 

d 

— ^ 


o 

v> 

en 

I 

o 


to 

£ 
5 




































< 

o 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


5 

IT 
3 

O 


si 


_'-0 

J 

a 
O 


3 

o 


J 

■ 0- 
O 


-■| 


cr 


•2 











































sesne3 uoissiui jegio nv 







^ 










is 








































1 E 


peBv sgi JOt seuiOH SS 


Q 














m 

S3 
v3 










































siBiidsoH as 


Q 







o 




V) 


CN 
CT) 




































ro 
-r 




OJ 


|spoo6 snid 

L|SE3) S9UJ0H S,U8JP|IL|3 


u 




o 
!x 




o 
o 








































\^ 




(S" 


( Oie 'SIOOLIDS) 

uoiieonpg ueiisulio gs 



















































o 








o 
o 




o 






Q 






































o 
c- 




CVJ 


6uij8))0 uoo]fi emo"! 




V) 


c 
o 




o 


<^ 






































cr 




O) 
Ol 
C\J 


suoissi^ amoH iamo 


o 




C 




VJ 




^; 




































o 






Suuauo 6U0J1SLUJV aiuuy 









e, 





v» 

v3 






































cj- 




« 
OJ 


suoissi^ aieis 


O 


vj 


O 


r< 

^ 











































bo 

C) 




s 

OJ 


suoissi^ leuoiieioossv 


<o 
-a 






O 
C) 






\^ 




































V, 
r- 




1 <^ 


ujBjBoJd aAiiBjedooQ 


0- 


va 


o 




Vi 

?>; 


:^ 






































v3 
-3 




1 jO 


sajnnpuadxe uoissjuj 
pajosuods-uDjngo jamo nv 




O 














































O 

^tr 




(0 


jseA em 
Suijnp uoiisnjjsuoo Mau uo 
ino piBd Aauo^ — uoissitf^ 


'0 




r" 








C( 




































in 






ajn|ipuadx3 uoissi^ leioi 




CO 

V3 
bo 


Cjo 


to 




to 
> 


<^ 








































TABLE G MISSION EXPENDITURES YEAR ENDING 1 994 


£ . 
=^ 

o 

T 
c I 

- t 
1^ 


<^ 

o 

.2 

3 

to 


CD 

ij 

1 c 

1 ' 
1- 


Q 
Q. ^ 

r5 ^ 

tr, 

15 
55 

b c 


CHURCH CLERKS S ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


V- 

o 
' — C 




o 

■ F 
1 

r- 

\r- 

'■ill 


to 

<v 

1^ 

y 

c 

=a 

■ 

3 

'i 

2 
O 


c 

c 


E 

i 

f 
c 


o 
X 

i 

-V- 


i. 

c 
O 

o 




































< 

H 

o 

(- 


I/) 
< 

o 

(- 
X 

2 

> 

o 

> 

LU 

tr 
a. 


in 

LU 

I 

(J 
a: 

I 

o 




i 


3 
I 


o- 

— o 


£ 


5 

<^ 









































CD 
IT) 


BuiieA0uet|/6uipiing 


"Z 




■5^ 


2 






2 








































in 


saAjMOJv MOJnilO 








^2 






2 








































to 


siseg % oossv 9A|9 
























































ie6png ui jedEj aieis 






2: 


















































leBpng 




>- 




2 


2 




Z 








































n 

iD 


eouBjnsui leoips^ JOise^ 






2: 


Z 


2 




2 








































OJ 


Buissaoojd leindujOQ 




2: 




'2. 


2 


2. 










































in 


jeiueQ eipeiflj/AjEjqq 


2 






2 


2 












































o 


nesM Vd sAJSsqo 


a 






2 


2 












































Ol 


siueujijujiuoo Buigiix 








2 






2 








































CO 


saiJisiui)^ Aiiunoiujoo 














a: 










































sdnojg poddns lonpuoQ 


2 


^ 




2l 




2 


2 








































ID 
-d- 


Ajisjui^ jooeaQ 


2 




2 




2 


2 


2 








































IT) 


Apms uoissi^ uBiejo^ 


2. 


2 




"2. 


2 














































u6i8iOj — jeAejd |0 i|ee/\/\ 


2 


■2. 


2 




^ 












































m 
rr 


Aprns uoissj^ sujOH 


2 


2 


2. 


2 






2 








































Cvj 

— 


suolSSl^^( 
9UJ0H — jaAejd |o >t8eM 


2. 








"2. 














































uouetiSjA 






"2 




>- 


> 










































O 


ssoiAjes |Euoi|e6ej6uoo 


z 




^• 




>- 




>- 








































a\ 
cn 


suosjsd pui|g AjieBei 











Q 


'Si 













































CO 

cn 


siuEdioiyEd 

lOSfOJcj SUOISSI^ 













Q 


'Cj 











































cn 


sujsiideg 
luapnis aBeiioo 










Q 














































en 


eouEpueuv 
eoiAjes diL|SJP/v\ 7^ v 












Q 










































l/l 
n 


IpunOQ iinpy 
e|6u!s/joiu3s 






















































CO 


ISBOpEOJg 








— 


— 












































(T) 

n 


UPIIOIL 


ojd isBpng 


- 


— 


















































TABLE H SPECIAL INFORMATION 


0_ 


■7- 

c 


■5 

< 


2 


5 
'a 

c 

« 

u5 


YEAR ENDING '7 - 3 I 1994 

(Monrh i Pay) 


CHURCHES 




J 
a- 

J 


J 

i 


s 

- 

<: 
-< 




2 
o- 

■ A 



a 

— c 
■2 

NT 




































TOTALS 1 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 



Pi 


iqea ipinyo 






o 


€ 








- 









































idjedOJd ipini4Q |0 sn|e/y 


o 





Q 


o 
o 
o 

o" 
o 


v> 


c 
o 

o" 






































o 

o 
o 
\A 
O 


; 




suoissm ieiJOi)Bpossv 



o 

v3 


!> 

■? 


o 


o 




(0 
>o 


«> 




































V) 






ujej6ojd eAjjejedooQ 









c> 

N 
n5 


V) 


o 

> 






































i)- 






sjniipuedx3 uoissm iejoj. 


(»- 
t^ 
v3 


v5 

Oo 

<s 


Oo 

o 


o 




> 


Oo 








































OJ 


sidieoej leiox 




>• 

■J 

\o 


0- 


O 

o 




> 

S 


n 










































LKMiedojijed/UJduJiiOJue 
pooitjemoig leiox 




O 


o 




o 


Q 






































>^ 






lueuiiiojug nmM |E)Oi 













o 


O 




































> 




SJ 


|ueuj||0ju3 







Q 


O 







ro 
«^ 




































> 




o 


uoiieclpiued/|ueui||OJU3 
Suiuiejx dmse|d|OSia leioi 




o 




O 


o 


o 


o 




































Co 






lueuj||0ju3 
looips BNig uoiiBOBA 







O 


o 


r< 


r< 

(JO 


0- 








































cy 


)ueuj||0JU3 
|0oi|os Aepuns leiOi 




vn 


^( 




Oo 
to 




cr 








































O) 


diMSjaqujen |G|0x 


o 


-9 




' V) 






6^ 










































( 3ie uaujeieis 
•jauet Aq) suottippe jemo 


C) 






:r 




O 












































stusitdeq leiox 


O 


(O 










<5 








































AjunoQ 


3 


—5' 

1 




a 


<^ 

- ? 




6 






































PREVIOUS YEAH TOTALS 


' ' ^ nOEST OF LETTERS 
IMPORTANT: This table is for use by the clerk in any 
way helplul. It is not to be sent to the state convention 
office or Southern Baptist Convention office. 


NAME OF CHURCH 


1 

C_ 

1 
* 


u 

—o 

c 


• 9 

o 

+- 

■7 

d 
— ' 


<s 

■ 1 

C 


. ^ 

■ t 

o 


y! 
o 

c 
















- 






















05 

5! 
1- 

o 

1- 



PK 




STONY FORK 
MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 
1995 ANNUAL 



1995 
MINUTES 
OF THE 

ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING 

OF 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 
HELD WITH 
BAILEY'S CAMP, AUGUST 11, 1995 
AND 

DOE RIDGE, AUGUST 12, 1995 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Associational Leaders 1 

Suggested Order of Business 2 

Constitution and Bylaws 3 

Proceedings 11 

Budget 18 

Foreign Missions 20 

Home Missions 24 

State Missions 26 

Children's Homes 27 

Retirement Homes 28 

Baptist Hospital 29 

Baptist Foundation 31 

Biblical Recorder o 32 

Stewardship 34 

Woman's Missionary Union 35 

Christian Higher Education 36 

Vacation Bible School 38 

Christian Action League 39 

Christian Life Commission 41 

Resolutions/Obituaries 42 

History/Historical Tables 43 

Tables 
Map 



SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 


State Convention 


Association 


Tei Area Coae 


ASSOCIATIONAL LEADERS - 1995 


forth Carolina 


Stony Fork 


704 



association, change the title to conform to tlie name of ttie Dosition used by your association. 



POSITION 



NAME 



MAILING ADDRESS. CITY. AND ZIP C ODE PHONE NO 



709 Laural Creek Rd . , Sugar Grove, N.C. 



Director of Assoc. Missions 
OFull-Time D Part-Time 



George Berry 



Assoc. Office Secretary 
□ Full-Time □Part-Time 



Religious Educ. or Church Dev. Dir 
□ Full-Time □Part-Time 



CSM Director 
□ Full-Time □ Part-Time 



Other Paid Staff (Soecify) 
□ Full-Time □Part-Time 



Other Paid Staff (Specify) 
□ Full-Time □Part-Time 



Moderator 



Ron Burgett 



2304 Maywood St Lenoir ,N . C . 28645 



726-0816 



Vice Moderator 



John McCourey 



Rt. 3, Box 307, Roan Mtn. , Tenn. 37687 



772-3807 



Clerk 



Linda Mills 



159 Hollifield Rd., Bloving Rock,NC 28605 



295-7095 



Treasurer 



Edith Gryder 



972 Edmisten Rd., Blowing Rock,NC 28605 



295-3410 



Pastoral Ministnes Director 



Sunday School Director 



Ron Burgett 



2304 Maywood St Lenoir .N. C. 28645 



726-0816 



Discipleship Training Director 



Charles Craig 



Rt . 3 . . Box 730, Boone, N.C 



28607 



363-4120 



Music Ministry Director 



Pauline Eldreth 



567 Grand Blvd., Boone, N.C. 28607 



264-2532 



Brothemood Director 



WMU Director 



Eunice Luttrell 



132 Collins Store Rd., Blowing Rock, 28605 



295-7732 



Evangelism Director 



George Berry 



709 Laural Creek Rd., Sugar Grove, 28679 



i97-I223 



Stewardship Director 



Roy Gryder 



972 Edmisten Rd., Blowing Rock, 28605 



Z95-3410 



Missions Development Director 



Media Library Director 



Recreation Director 



Family Ministry Director 

Chnstian Life Director 
(or Committee Chairman) 



Seminary Extension Director 



Student Ministnes Director 
(or Committee Chairman) 



Administrative 
Committee Chairman 



Communications 
Committee Chairman 



Finance Committee Chairman 



Edith Gryder 



972 Edmisten Rd., Blowing Rock, 28605 



295-341 



History Committee Chairman 



Nominating Committee Chairman 



Max West 



3353 Winkler's Creek Rd., Blowing Rock, 28605 264-24 



Strategy Committee Chairman 



NEXT 
ANNUAL 
MEETING 



Location (Churches, oc. Places) , , 
Laytown ana Long Ridgt 



Date 



Time of Opening Session 
ciilMoming □Afternoon □Evening 



Closinq Date 
8-1(1-96 



Time of Closing Session 

CI^Moming □Afternoon □Eveninc 



SUGGESTED ORDER OF BUSINESS FOR 1996 
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY FIFTH 
ANNUAL MEETING OF STONY FORK 
MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

Friday Morning, August 9, 1995 
Laytown 

8:30 Call to Order 

8:35 Song 

8:40 Devotion 

8:50 Adoption of Program 

9:00 Roll Call 

9:05 Recognition of New Pastors and Workers 

9:10 Vacation Bible School 

9:15 Foreign Missions 

9:25 Sunday School 

9:30 Cooperative Program 

9:40 Evangelism 

9:50 Finance Report - Budget 

10:00 Break 

10:10 Home Missions 

10:25 State Missions 

10:40 Children's Homes 

10:55 Retirement Homes 

11:10 Baptist Hospital 

11:25 Christian Higher Education 

11:40 Baptist Foundation 

11:55 Stewardship 

12:10 Annual Message 

1:00 Adjourn - Lunch 

SATURDAY HORNING^ AUGUST 10, 1996 
LONG RIDGE 

Call to Order 
Song 

Devotion 
Roll Call 
Biblical Recorder 
Disclpleship Training 
Women on Mission 

Temperance and Morals - Christian 
Action League 
General Board Report 
Stewardship Report 
Break 

Resolutions 
Obituaries 

Business Meeting - Election of 
Officers - Approve budget 
Annual Message 
Adjourn - Lunch 



8:30 
8:35 
8:40 
8:50 
8:55 
9:05 
9:15 
9:25 

9:50 
9:55 
10 : 00 
10: 10 
10: 15 
10:20 

11 :00 
12:00 



OONSTITtrriON 



OF THE STONY FORK MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PREAMBLE 

For the declaration of its fundamental purposes and the permanent guidance 
and control of its activities, the body does adopt the following as its constitution/ 
to wit: 

ARTICLE I - Name and Membership 

Section 1. This body shall be known as the Stony Fork Missionary Baptist 
Association of North Carolina. 

Section 2. The Association is composed of Missionary Baptist Churches. 

Section 3. Any Baptist Church may be admitted into this Association upon 
recommendation of the Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitution of 
the Churches Committee and the majority vote of members present at any meeting 
as prescribed in Article IX. 

Section 4. Any Church at her discretion/ may withdraw from this body. 

Section 5. This association may, at any meeting/ after an investigation 
and report of a duly authorized committee of the Association/ by an majority 
vote/ declare a dissolution of union with any church deemed corrupt/ either 
in doctrine or practice. 

Section 6. Each church shall elect its messengers to the Annual Associational 
meeting. Each messenger must be certified in the annual church letter to the 
Association and must be appointed on the following ratio: Five messengers/ 
in' addition to the pastor/ for each church having a membership not exceeding 
fifty/ and one additional messenger for each increase of fifty. In no case 
shall the total number of messengers exceed ten for any given church/ in addition 
to the pastor. 

Section 7. When any church shall fail to be represented by letter or 
messenger for two consecutive years / the Missions Committee shall confer with 
the church/ and if satisfactory reason is not given/ and there is no evidence 
that said church wishes to keep alive their affiliation with the Association/ 
the committee shall bring its findings to the next Executive Conmittee Meeting, 
the Association shall/ at that time, by a majority of present members/ vote 
to withdraw fellowship. The Association recognizes the right of any affiliated 
church to withdraw its fellowship from the Association. 

Section 8. The Annual Associational meeting shall convene on Friday at 
8:30 a.m. and adjourn at 1:00 p.m. (lunch to follow). It shall reconvene 
at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday and adjourn at the completion of business for the 
noon meal. This following the first Sunday in August. 

ARTICLE II - Purpose 

Section 1. The prime purpose of the Association shall be to counsel together 
for the enlargement and strengthening of God's kingdom and to promote unity 
and growth among the churches composing it. 

Section 2. It shall be the purpose of this Association to enlist all 
of the churches into full cooperation with the North Carolina Baptist State 
Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention and their agencies in the work 
of missions/ evangelism/ christian education and social service. 

ARTICLE III - Powers and Perogatives 
Section 1. The Association/ when covened in meeting/ shall sit as an 
advisory council and shall have no power to infringe on any of the internal 



3 



rights and affairs of the member churches. It may advise, however, with them 
ember churches and recommend measures of usefulness for their adoption or rejection. 

Section 2. When grievances occur between any members or minority group 
of any church which is a member of the Association, the Association, the Executive 
Committtee, or Missions Committee, or the committee designated by and acting 
for either of these bodies, may advise or give aid in [natters which do not 
infringe on the rights of the local church, and this only on the invitation 
of the individual or group involved. 

Section 3. Any church found unfaithful to the faith and practices common 
to the Association, as outlined in Addendum I - ARTICLES OF FAITH (The Baptist 
Faith and Message as adopted by the Southern Baptist Convention in 1963) shall 
be encouraged to correct such errors. If the conduct of said church is not 
corrected and is of such nature as to alienate said church from the orderly 
and faithful churches of the Association, the Executive Committee of the Association 
can recommend that fellowship be withdrawn from said church, and upon a majority 
vote of the messengers in an Annual session, fellowship with such church can 
be withdrawn. (See Article 1, Section 7), 

ARTICLE ly - The Executive Committee 

Section 1. The Association shall have an Executive Committee to serve 
as the Association between Annual Meetings, assisting in the overall work of 
the Association with such limitations as may be imposed by the constitution. 

Section 2. The Executive Committee shall be composed of the associational 
officers and the Pastors, and the Chairman of Deacons, along with two elected 
lay persons from each church. Sixteen members shall constitute a quorum. 
The names of these persons shall be furnished annually to the associational 
clerk, if changes occur during the associational year, these changes shall 
be forwarded to the Clerk. 

Section 3. At the beginning of each Executive Committee Meeting, a roll 
call will be taken of each church and its representatives. 

Section 4. The Executive Committee shall meet within two weeks after 
the Annual Associational Meeting, the second Sunday of November, March, and 
July. These meetings shall be held in churches of the Association, consecutively, 
in alphabetical order. 

ARTICLE V - Officers 

Section 1. The officers of this body shall be: Moderator, Vice-Moderator, 
Clerk, Treasurer, Sunday School Director, Church Training Director/ Brotherhood 
Director, W.M.U. Directory, Vacation Bible School Director, Music Director, 
Pianist, and Evangelism Director. 

Section 2. The officers of the Association shall be elected at each regular 
Annual Associational Meeting. The Nominating committee shall fill vacancies 
that may occur in the respective categories between annual meetings of the 
Association by bringing names to the Executive Committee for their approval. 

Section 3. By the virtue of the office, the Associational Director of 
Missions is considered an ex-officio member of all Associational Committees. 
For all qualifications and terms of office see Article VII, Section 1. 

ARTICLE VI - Duties of Officers 
Section 1. It shall be the duty of the Moderator of the Association to 
preside over the Annual Sessions, and at the quarterly meetings of the Executive 
Committee. As the presiding officer, he shall open the meetings punctually 
as the appointed time, enforce the rules, preserve order, and exercise all 
the perogatives of a presiding officer according to the principles of established 
parlimentary usage. He shall provide leadership for a progressive ideal throughout 



the Association. He shall be elected for a one year term, and he shall not 

succeed himself for a maximum of two full terms. He shall appoint in advance 

any other committees he may deem necessary or advisable. Each of these committees 

shall report at tht; Annual Meeting for which they are appointed. It shall 

be the responsibility of the Moderator to call any needed meetings at any 

time he deems necessary. The moderator is considered an ex-officio member 

of all committees. 

Section 2. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to discharge 
the duties of the Moderator in his absence or at his request. 

Section 3. It shall be the duty of the Clerk to keep an accurate record 
of the proceedings of the Association in regular and special sessions; to 
keep accurate records of quarterly meetings of the Executive Committee; to 
keep on file the printed minutes and other important documents belonging 
to the Association; to furnish the churches with blank letter forms on which 
to make the annual reports to the Association; to superintend the printing 
of the minutes, and to distribute them to the churches as soon after adjournment 
as possible. For this service the clerK shall be paid annually an amount 
recommended by the Finance Committee and approved by the Association. 

Section 4. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive all funds 
of the Association and to disburse the same in accordance with the budget 
of the Association or for the purposes for which the funds were contributed. 
To render to the Association an itemized report of the receipts and disbursements 
at the first session of the Annual Meeting. In the treasurer's absence, 
a member of the Finance Committee shall give the report. The Treasurer- shall 
make available through the associational newsletter a quarterly report including 
the contributions of each church in the Association. A quarterly report 
shall be made available at the quarterly meetings of the Executive Committee. 
For this service, the Treasurer shall be paid annually an amount recommended 
by the Finance Committee and approved by the Association. 

Section 5. The Sunday School Director shall take the initiative in 
promoting inspirational meetings, study courses, and leadership classes for 
the churches of the Association. He shall work in cooperation with the 
denominational Sunday school Agencies in promoting the denominational programs; 
and he will be responsible for coordinating and promoting Vacation Bible 
school work in conjunction with the Vacation Bible School Director. He shall 
also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 6. The Discipleship Training Director shall take the initiative 
in promoting the regular meetings projected by the State Convention and be 
available to the churches for help in strengthening the established unions 
and encourage the organization of new unions in churches without them. He 
shall also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for 
his organization. 

Section 7. The Brotherhood Director shall be responsible for promoting 
missionary education within our Association and be available to the churches 
to assist in strengthening organizations and programs of existing units. 
He shall also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership 
for his organization. 

Section 8. The WMU Director shall be responsible for promoting missionary 
education within our Association and she shall be available in the churches 
to assist in promoting and establishing new Baptist Women and Baptist Women 
Auxiliary units, and shall assist in strengthening the organizations and 
programs of existing units. She shall also work with the Nominating Committee 
in enlisting leadership for her organization. 

Section 9. The Vacation Bible School Director shall work in conjunction 
with the Sunday School Director in enlisting and training workers, planning 



5 



and organizing for the annual Vacation Bible School Clinic. 

Section 10. The Music Director shall take the initiative in promoting 
the meetings and activities suggested by the state music leadership and be 
available to the churches to help in strengthening their music programs. 
The Music Director will also be responsible for the music at the associatinal 
and Executive Committee meetings. He shall also work with the Nominating 
Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

Section 11. The Pianist will be responsible for playing the piano at 
all associational and Executive Committee meetings. 

Section 12. The Evangelism Chairman will work with the Evangelism program 
in planning, promoting, and coordinating all evangelistic activities for 
the Association in conjunction with the Director of Missions. 

ARTICLE VII - Director of Missions 
Statement of Purpose and Position Title: 

The office or position will be known as the Director of Missions for the 
Stony Fork Missionary Baptist Association. The Director of Missions shall 
provide responsible leadership in the work of the Association through performing 
such basic functions as the planning, correlation, and implementation of 
programs of programs, program services, and ministries of the Association; 
counsel the churches; agencies of needs, problems, and potentialities, with 
the the Association; and interpret to the churches the program resources 
and other assistance available from the Baptist State Convention and Southern 
Baptist Convention agencies. 

Section 1. RESPONSIBILITIES 

A. Planning and Coordination 

1. Lead the Association in strategy planning; establishing and 
maintaining a long-range program. Lead the Association to set goals and 
encourage the churches to work toward them. 

2. Coordinate the associational work and meetings by serving as 
ex-officio member of all committees. 

3. Work with program officers and the Nominating Committee is selecting 
and enlisting leaders for organizations and committees of the Association. 

4. Counsel/ encourage/ and lead in training the associational officers. 
B. Education and Promotion 

1. Seek to assist the pastors and the churches in programs suitable 
for their growth and development/ recognizing the differences in size and 
diversity or membership/ utilizing persuasion to promote fellowship and cooperation. 

2. Seek out in cooperation with the Missions Corranittee/ places 
of mission needs and seek to enlist and appropriate church to meet these 
needs. In the event no church (es) can be enlisted/ upon the instruction 

of the Missions Committee/ the Director of Missions may lead in such a program 
in the name of Stony Fork Baptist Association. 

3. Promote church organizational programs: Sunday School, Disciple- 
ship training/ Church MusiC/ Brotherhood/ WMU/ and Vacation Bible School 

and Leadership Training. 

4. Promote church assistance programs: Evangelism/ Stewardship/ 
and Family Life. 

5. Plan for and promote simultaneous efforts/ such as: World 
Missions Conferences, revival crusades / enlargement campaigns, training school/ 
etc. 

6. Prepare in cooperation with the Missions Committee an annual 
associational calendar. Prepare a monthly associational newsletter for distribution 
in the Association. 

7. Attend denominational meetings and conferences as budget and 
time considerations permit. 



6 



8. Report to the executive board at its regular meetings and to 
the Association in annual session. 
C. Service Ministry 

1. Provide counsel and help as requested by pastors and churches. 

2. Serve as pulpit supply/ assist in church surveys/ and conduct 
studies and revivals as requested in keeping with terms of employment. Pulpit 
supply for a period of 4 weeks. 

3. Manage the associational office/ supervise associational employees, 
and maintain equipment of the Association. 

4. Cooperate with the Finance Committee in planning the budget 
and promoting giving to the Association. 

5. Establish and announce office hours to best utilize the division 
of time between the assocational office and field responsibilities. 

6. Always working through the pastor / the Director of Missions 
will be available to offer aid to churches in need of assistance. No program 
will be conducted for a church without the invitation of the pastor and/or 
church. In the event the church is without a pastor, the Director of Missions 
will respond to requests from the church leadership. 

Section 2. TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT 

A. term of Office - The Director of Missions shall be called for an 
indefinite term of service. 

B. Remuneration - Remuneration will be recommended by the Missions 
and Finance Committees and approved by Stony Fork Baptist Association. - 

C. Honorariums - Honorariums received for pulpit supply, weddings/ 
funerals/ -.revivals/ and pastoral service/ not directly related to his normal 
responsibilities; shall.be considered personal remuneration. 

D. Work Schedule - Work schedules will vary, with weekends normally 
being kept for services in churches in the Association. 

E. Work Accountability - The Missions Committee pledges itself to a 
ministry of loyalty, support, and loving encouragement of the Director of 
Missins/ so that under the leadership of the Spirit of God, he may render 
the most effective service possible. 

F. Both parties must give a thirty day notice before termination. 
Section 3. QUALIFICATIONS 

A. Spiritual - A committed Christian with a sense of definite call to 
mission service . 

B. Educational - Preferably college and seminary degrees, or their 
equivalent. 

C. Special Knowledge and Skills - Knowledge of Baptist denominational 

life and a willingness to continue to learn; vision/ flexibility/ and demonstrated 
leadership/ ability in planning, conducting/ and evaluating the work of the 
Association. 

D. Character - Christian integrity. 

E. Experience - Pastoral mirustr^ ^Christian education or associational 
and other raissin experience are io^s^teg^ Preferably the associational 
experience should be as a Director of Missions/ associational staff member 

or as an active and responsible officer in the Association. The mission 
experience may be in the establishment of and involvement in mission outreach 
and ministry in a mission/ church or association. 

ARTICLE VIII - Committees and Their Duties 
Section 1. The committee of Time, Place and Preacher shall be composed 
of three members. It shall be the duty of the committee to recommend to 
the Association/ the churches where the next session will be held/ preferably 
to be taken in alphabetical order/ and also the preacher for the annual session. 



In order to alleviate any hardship on any one church hosting an associational 
meeting/ it is suggested that two churches may jointly host each meeting. Expenses, 
meeting places, and other arrangements will be coordinated by the churches selected. 

Section 2. The Committee on Resolutions shall be composed of two members. 
It shall be the duty of this committee to draw up and present to the Association 
suitable resolutions of appreciation and expressions of sentiments on any matter 
chosen by the committee or as directed by the messengers of the Association. 

Section 3. The Program Committee shall be composed of the general officers 
of the Association. It shall be the duty of this committee ot prepare and present 
a suggested order of business to be adopted by the Association. When adopted, 
the program becomes the order of business unless changed by common consent or 
by the vote of the body. 

Section 4. The Committee of Nominations shall be composed of five members 
(pastors of each church). It shall be the duty of the committee to prepare for 
the Association the names of individuals as nominees for the following officers 
and reports: tModerator, Vice-Moderator, Treasurer, Clerk, Sunday School director, 
Discipleship Training Director, iMusic Director, Vacation Bible School Director, 
Brotherhood Director, Pianist, Evangelism Director, and Associational State 
Representatives, also persons for the following reports shall also be selected: 
Home Missions, State Missions, Foreign Missions, Stewardship, Cooperative Program, 
Obituaries, Temperance an Morals, V.B.S., W.M.U., Sunday School, and any others 
designated by the Association. Representatives for the following shall be selected: 
N.C. Baptist Hospital, N.C. Childrens Home, Baptist Home for the Aging, Denominational 
Colleges (Christian Higher Education), Denominational Literature, Annuity Board, 
Baptist Foundation, and any others designated by the Association. The Committee 
on Nominations shall be responsible for selection and contacting each of these 
persons for their approval before the annual meeting. The floor shall be open 
for nominations for these officers on the day of the annual meeting. Nominations 
from the floor shall be taken first, then the Chairperson of the Nominating Commmittee 
shall give the nomination of the committee. All nominees must be contacted beforehand 
and permission given for acceptance of nomination. The W.M.U. will elect their 
officers. 

Section 5. The Finance Committee shall be composed of five members/ one 
of which will include the Treasurer of the Association. It shall be the duty 
of this committee to prepare and recommend a budget for the Association and to 
suggest ways and means whereby the budget can be raised by the local churches 
and to secure the cooperation of the churches in raising the budget. The Finance 
Committee will present the proposed budged on the first day of the annual associational 
meeting with discussion and adoption scheduled for the second day. The Finance 
Committee shall meet prior to the quarterly Executive Committee Meeting and shall 
prepare a regular form acceptable to the Association/ a detailed financial report 
which shall be given to each member present at the quarterly meeting and the 
annual associational meeting. 

Section 6. The Missions Committee shall be composed of five members (pastors [ 
of each church) and this. conmittee shall report to and cooperate with the Executive 
Committee of the Association. The duties of this committee are: (a) to. coordinate 
and help promote through the organizations and committees all phases and activities 
of the associational programs, (b) to cooperate with the local churches in making 
surveys of areas which, in the opinion of the Missions Committee, are not being 
adequately served by the local missionary Baptist work, and to promote and develop 
those new phases of the Missions programs, (c) to serve in advisory capacity 
to the Director of Missions in all matters pertaining to his work and to serve 
with him in directing and promoting the missions programs of the Association, 
(d) to provide information and assistance to the departments of State Missions 
of the North Carolina Baptist Convention in meeting local missionary needs / such 



8 



as Missionary pastor's assistance/ promoting mission causes/ etc., (e) the Missions 
Committee shall meet prior to the Executive Committee of the Association or at 
any time necessary to discharge its duties/ (f) this committee shall have the 
following responsibilities relating to the office of Director of Missions: 

1. Serve as a search committee for a Director of Missions. 

2. Recommend to the Executive Committee the name of the nominee. 

3. Coordinate financial matters with the Baptist State Convention. 

4. Serve as a liaison between the churches and the Director of Missions. 
Section 7. The Constitution and By-Laws Committee shall be composed of 

the Missions Committee and one selected layperson of the Association making six 
members. It shall be the duty of this committee to review and update the Constitution 
and By-Laws as it becomes necessary. This committee will recommend revisions 
and amendments concerning the constitution and by-laws to the Association as 
deemed necessary. They shall meet at least once a year before the annual meeting 
to review and discuss the constitution. 

Section 8. The Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the 
churches: 

ARTICLE IX - Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of churches 

The Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the Churches shall 
be made up of the Missions Committee members. 

Section 1. Any group of baptized believers in Christ desiring to organize 
themselves into missionary Baptist church with the purpose of seeking the recognition 
of/ and fellowship and cooperate with this Association/ shall be required to 
fulfill the following requirements. They shall submit their request for admission 
to the Director of Missions or the Moderator of the Association/ who will in 
turn forward it to the Committee of Petitionary Letters. In addition to the 
letter of request/ a church must also furnish a report of work accomplished since 
its organization/ a copy of the church covenant/ and its articles of faith. 

Section 2. Any church seeking admission into the fellowship of the Association 
must be under the watchcare of the Association for a period of one year before 
it can be admitted. During this interim period/ the church shall be expected 
to have part in the support of the causes fostered by the Association/ the North 
Carolina State Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention. 

Section 3. the findings of the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall be 
reported at the annual associational meeting or at the Executive Committee meeting 
with a recommendation either for or against admission. 

Section 4. If the church is accepted under the watchcare of the Association, 
the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall recommend at the end of the year that 
the church be accepted into full fellowship provided that examination of that 
years work done and a study of the cooperative spirit of that church proves to 
be in accordance to the principles of the churches of the Association. A two-thirds 
majority vote of the Messengers or Executive Committee members present shall 
be needed for such an action to be completed. There will be an appropriate program 
conducted during the annual meeting to formally welcome this new church into 
the Association. 

Section 5. For a sister cooperative Missionary Baptist church that is affiliated 
with the Southern Baptist Convention, that wishes to join or transfer status, 
the same procedure is needful with the exception of the one year of associatinal 
watchcare. Upon receipt of letter of request/ the Committee of Petitions shall 
recommend its findings to the Executive Committee/ and after a thirty day period 
of investigation/ the discretion of the Executive Committee shall be used if 
immediate acceptance of fellowship is possible. If accepted/ a program of welcoming 
shall be presented at the annual associational meeting. 



9 



ARTICLE X - Amendments 

The constitution or any part of the constitution shall be 
amended at the annual associational meeting in August, with the 
acceptance by two-thirds majority vote. It is suggested that all 
changes and recommendations of amendments be submitted two months 
prior to the annual meeting, to the Constitution and By-Laws 
Committee for their careful consideration; however, any messenger 
has the right to submit proposed changes in accordance with this 
article . 

By-Laws 

1. All associational meetings shall be opened and closed 

in prayer. 

2. "Roberts Rules of Order" shall be used as a guideline 
for parliamentary procedure in all associational meetings. The 
Moderator will be responsible for having a copy of same at all 
meetings and a copy of parliamentary procedures and the gavel of 
the association shall be transferred upon succession of the 
moderator . 

3. All associational officers shall exercise authority 
over their department and shall give a financial accounting to the 
Finance Committee for monies expended. 

4. Election and installation of officers shall take 
place on the last day of the annual associational meeting in 
August, and these officers shall be responsible for planning, 
coordinating, and providing leadership for the coming year in the 
Association. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS 

Time, Place and Preacher Committee will be amended to the 
hosting church pastor or a preacher of his choice will be the 
preacher for the associational meetings. Committee membership will 
be filled according to the number of people participating in 
associational work. 

Article VIII - Committees and their duties, Section 4 amended 
to: recommendations from the Nominating Committee shall be 
presented first, then nominations will be taken from the floor. 



10 



PROCEEDINGS 
FOR 

THE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING 

OF 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION 

The me'etiAQ waa called to ardei at a 1 321 a.m. on Fi'lday, August 11, 
1995 at Bailey's Camp Baptist Church by the Moderator, Ron Burgett. 
The meeting was conducted in the following order: 

8:35 Song - "How Firm a Foundation". 

8:40 Prayer and Devotion led by Max West from John 10: 27-30. 

We have security in our foundation in the Lord. Matthew 
27: 27-56 - The reason we are here, the reason we have hope 
of life beyond the grave is Jesus. We have much to be 
grateful for. We must get our minds back on Christ. 

8:45 Adoption of Program - It was moved for the adoption of 

the program as printed with changes to be made as necessary 
for the convenience of the speakers and presenters. 

9:00 Roll Call - Bailey's Camp 4, Doe Ridge 3, Laytown 4'; Long 
Ridge 3, Mt. Ephraim 2, Rock Spring 4, Sandy Flat 4, other 
1. Total 30. 

9:05 Recognition of new pastors and workers in the Association - 

there were none present 
9:06 There was no general board report. 

9:10 Evangelism - Ed Bullock, speaker. Evangelism is the focus 
of why we do all things. Our purpose in going is to tell 
people about Jesus. Evangelism is witnessing and the Lord 
has told us to witness to everyone. This is our business. 
Matthew 9: 36-38 tells us this. We know what to do but we 
are not doing it. We are unfocused and must see what the 
Lord saw when he looked upon the people. To do this we 
must pray and be laborers with God. If North Carolina will 
do this right, the rest of the country will follow. 

9:20 Foreign Missions - Ken Boaz, speaker. A partnership 

mission like the Ukraine/N. C. partnership is one of the 
best things Southern Baptist have done. For 70 years the 
Ukraine was ashiest as part of the Soviet Union. Anyone 
claiming to be a Christian was persecuted and ridiculed as 
were their children. It was illegal to own a Bible. God's 
hand brought down communism and the barriers fell down. 
The country is new, 5 years old, but there are strong 
Christians with a deep sense of God and reverence to Him. 
With doors now opened, N. C. Baptists entered that door in 
partnership to do three things. 1. Train and minister - 
we are building a seminary in the capital of Kiev. 2. 
Sponsor Home Missionaries, natives called to the ministry. 
The economy is weak and the churches are not able to 
provide funds. For $700. 00 a year, you could sponsor 
someone, a minister or other worker. 3. Construction of 
new churches. Several teams have gone over to help build 
new churches. Last September, my team, 4 of us, went over 
and worked in a church in Sumi, near the Russian border. 

LI 



God is doing wonderful things in the Ukraine. Pray for 
people around the world and for peace. 

9:45 Financial Report given- copies of budget distributed, 

moved and seconded to approve report. Approved. 

9:50 Home Missions - Dan Lipp, speaker from the Church Building 
and Planning Dept. Psalm 100 - the Lord's house is very 
special to each of us. Our church is a lighthouse to the 
community. Commitments are made there including accepting 
the Lord, and marriages. Most of my time is not spent 
helping build new churches, but in helping established 
churches better utilize their space. There is no charge 
for this, it is a free ministry. Louise Gentry is the 
representative for this area. 

10:00 Break. 

10:15 State Missions - Roy Holder, speaker from Church Extension 
Dept. N. C. State Missions offerings kind of glide by, not 
getting the recognition that some of the other offerings 
do. N. C. is a mission field, over 3 mission unchurched 
people, more than half the population of the state. There 
are 21,000 people in prison, 27,000 in rest homes, 28,000 
unwed mothers, 60, 000 deaf, 175, 000 migrant workers, 
100, 000 with drug and alcohol problems and 40 million 
tourist each year, all mission needs that we may not be 
aware of. WMU and Baptist Men also receive funds from the 
offering, including the funding for the disaster and 
medical van. Language missions is something we need to be 
aware of - even if we are not directly involved. My appeal 
to you today is to make your church people aware of the 
N. C. Missions offering and they will give generously. 

10:30 Home Missions - Tom Lolly, speaker. There are 1244 

churches in the 32 counties of Western North Carolina, 
one-third of the churches in the state. Acts 1:8-9 says 
"ye shall be witnesses unto me". These were Jesus' last 
words. The first missionary appointed in N. C. was to the 
Cherokee almost 150 years ago. Our missionary there nov 
is a Cherokee native and is opening doors never before 
opened. When we talk about missions, whether home, state, 
foreign or national, we're not done yet. In fact, we are 
falling behind. There is something in the very nature of 
being a Christian that deaands we be a witness! 
10:45 Children's Homes - Bill Morrow, speaker. Jesus loved and 
loves children and children and families are our ministry. 
Many people do not have patenting skills and we try to 
teach them these skills so the family can be together. 
Cooperative Program funds enable us to provide quality 
care for these children and families in 12 facilities 
across the state. Emergency care is provided on each 
campus and is available for 60 days and then the child 
can return home if the home situation has improved. 
Because you pray and give, you are involved in the 
Children's Homes ministry. Cameron Boys camp is for boys 
who are having serious problems in their family and 
society. James 1:27 tells us what our ministry is. We 
do not have many orphans, but lots of children from 

12 



dysfunctional families, this is our ministry. 
11:05 Retirement Homes - Calvin Knight, speaker. We have homes 
in 4 locations providing many levels of care. Number one 
is independent living where residents are able to care for 
themselves in duplexes and apartments. Number two is 
assisted living where residents are able to do most things 
for themselves but need some assistance with activities of 
daily living, with units on all 4 campuses. Number three 
is assisted independent living where the residents are 
basically able to care for themselves but occasionally need 
some assistance with activities of daily living. Number 
four is nursing care in which there are two levels, 
intermediate and skilled nursing. This ranges from mobile 
to bedridden residents. A new service in the two nursing 
care units is an Alzheimer's day care where well-trained 
professional leadership is available to help bring them 
out of their shells. It is amazing what some of these 
residents are able to do. Also respite care is available 
when family member caregivers can leave the older person 
for a day or a week for care when they are sick or need 
time. Home health services provide physical, emotional and 
social contact in the recipient's own home. Some of these 
people have no resources to pay for these services if it 
were not for you giving in Feb. to the Retirement Homes 
offering. 

11:20 Baptist Hospital - Calvin Knight, speaker. Why are we 

involved in the health care business? Our Lord spent a lot 
of His time healing people. He told his disciples to heal 
the sick. The church has been involved in establishing 
health care for those who are sick since the beginning of 
the church. The quality of health care continues to be one 
of the best in N. C. at Baptist Hospital. The Children's 
Hospital is one of the 10 largest in the U. S. , caring for 
children from birth to 18 years. Some are referred from 
other countries by our foreign missionaries. The Center 
on Aging is for care of older people. The cancer treatment 
center is one of the best in the nation and treats so many 
people with this dreaded disease. The people working there 
at every level are constantly reminded that they are 
stewards of the funds provided by Southern Baptists. 
Baptist Hospital has a keen concern for those who need the 
services available but cannot afford it. But we are able 
to provide care for those who have no resources through 
the Mother's Day offering. 

11:30 Baptist Foundation - Coy Jeans, speaker. It was not a good 
year financially last year but the first 6 months of 1995 
have regained what was lost last year plus approximately 
15'/.. John 14:1 says "let not your heart be troubled". I 
have encountered many troubled hearts this past year. 
Troubled over the material things God has blessed them with 
that they are afraid their children will wastefully spend. 
There are tools available through the Baptist Foundation 
called trust funds that can solve this problem. Everyone 
should have a last will and testament. This is good 



13 



Christian stewardship and estate planning. We are your 
agency to help you do this. 

12:05 Annual Message - Max West. John 3:1-7, Isaiah 53, and 

Romans 1 : 16. What We Are Lacking In Qur World Today. The 
greatest need in our society is that people should be born 
again. We need a life-changing experience with the Lord 
to see a change in society and our lives. We as preachers 
and workers in the church need to examine our lives. If 
we are truly born again we will be different. Sin exists 
because people are not saved. We have our focus off the 
things we should be doing. We lack power in our lives and 
we need the power of God in our lives as Christians and we 
can have His power by giving our lives over to the Holy 
Spirit. We need to refresh and renew our minds and hearts, 
that Jesus Christ is the only way of salvation that the 
world has. We, as Christians, need to read in Isaiah 53 
how Jesus suffered and who he was suffering for. He is the 
only way we have hope. How is new birth possible? God 
so loved the world that he sent his Son. We don't take 
seriously the word of God and what it says. God loved us 
enough to give His only Son to be put to death so the world 
could be saved and Jesus was willing to die. We need a new 
people, different, in whom old things have passed away. 
If your life is the same as it has always been, you are 
lost, without Christ. What needs to happen in our lives 
as Christians? We need the new birth, that new experience 
with God. We are more concerned with what were are going 
to put into our stomach than what we are going to do with 
the Bread of Life. Paul said "be not ashamed of the gospel 
of Christ". Think about our churches and families, people 
on rolls but not in church, they never had an experience 
with the Lord. i 

12:40 Prayer 

Adjournment 
Lunch 



14 



PROCEEDINGS 
FOR 

STONY FORK ASSOCIATION ANNUAL HEETING 
SECOND DAY 
AT 

DOE RIDGE BAPTIST CHURCH 
AUGUST 12, 1995 

8:30 Called to order by the moderator. 

8:35 Song - "Prayer Bells of Heaven". 

8:40 Prayer - George Berry 

8:45 Devotion - Arvil Hardy - 2 Thessalonians 3:14-15. Even 

though someone may not believe as we do, we should still 
count them as a brother and not an enemy. 

8:50 Special singing. 

8:55 Roll Call - Bailey's Camp 3, Doe Ridge 4, Laytown 3, 

Long Ridge 1, Mt Ephraim 0, Rock Spring 4, Sandy Flat 3, 
other 5, total 22. 

9:00 Biblical Recorder - no speaker, report received. 

9:05 Stewardship - Roy Gryder 

9:10 Discipleship Training - Fred Luncford, Church Growth 
Multiplier who works with 35 churches in this area to 
help them grow. When doing the Lord's work, there are 
souls at stake. There is $100. 00 worth of free material 
available through the Sunday School Board to help get 
you started with a Discipleship Training program or study. 

9:20 Woman's Missionary Union - Sharon Kepart - speaker. "Risk 
the Journey" is our theme for this year. It is exciting 
to go on a journey with God. The watchword for 1995-96 is 
Isaiah 42-16. Some things we will need on our journey 
includes the Bible or our map. Our umbrella which covers 
Children in Action, Youth on Mission, Adults on Mission and 
Mission Friends. We need our make-up kit to represent 
changes that are coming up this year. We must take our 
camera so we will not lose our focus. We take our 
organizer or daily planner for reporting. We need an alarm 
clock to remind us we can't just talk about missions but 
we need to get up and get bust, it is time to grow. Take 
along a snack pack to remind us of the sweet promises from 
God - he will fill us with (Almond) Joy, we are grown-ups 
not Baby (Ruth), Three Musketeers to remind us we are all 
for one and one for all. Milky Way to remind us to keep our 
minds on heavenly things, Tootsie Roll to remind us God's 
love lasts forever, Butterf inger , God's hand is there to 
pick us up, God is the only LIfesaver we have. If we think 
what's the use, remember some say there will be a Payday. 
Are you ready to start the journey with me? 

9:35 Vacation Bible School, no speaker. 

9:40 Sunday School - Fred Luncford, speaker. In Acts 6:7 we 

learn we have the responsibility and privilege of spreading 
the Gospel to a lost and dying world. Every church I know 
about has a Sunday School. Use Sunday School as a 
launching pad to reach people. You cannot teach those you 
cannot reach. One out of three people who are, or have 



15 



been enrolled in Sunday School, are saved at some point 
in life. Seventy-nine percent of the people in Sunday 
School were invited by a friend or relative according to 
a recent survey. It is exciting to be a Christian and 
reach people for the Lord. 

10:00 Christian Higher Education - Sue Fitzgerald, speaker. 

We have all kings of students on our campus. If you need 
help you can get it. We have all the resources you would 
need to start any program published by Southern Baptists. 
What is life? It is only life if it is grounded in faith. 

10:10 Break 

10:30 New York Missions Partnership trip - Roy Gryder. We will 
be leaving the first week in Sept. and will be going to 
New Jersey which is affiliated with New York Association. 
We will be doing a lot of finish work. Seven men have 
agreed to go thus far. Thank you and your church people 
for supporting this so well. 

10:40 Resolutions - Betty Woods. 

10:43 Obituaries - Clerk. 

10:45 Election of Officers - Max West, Nominating Committee. 

Officers elected - Moderator - Ron Burgett, Vice Moderator 
- John McCoury, Clerk - Linda Mills, Treasurer - Edith 
Gryder, Sunday School Director - Ron Burgett, Discipleship 
Training - Charles Craig, Music Director - Pauline Eldreth, 
.- iano Player - Luann Burgett, Evangelism - George Berry, 
Stewardship - Roy Gryder, Finance Committee Chairman - 
Edith Gryder, Nominating Committee Chairman - Max West, 
Vacation Bible School - Barbara West, Foreign Missions - 

John McCoury, Home Missions - Eric Greene, State Missions - 
Charles Smith, Children's Homes - Jeri Triplett, Retirement 
Homes - Mamie Craig, Baptist Hospital - Edwana Smith, 
Baptist Foundation - Dale Luttrell, Biblical Recorder - 
Allison Smith, Temperance and Morals (Christian Action 
League) - Riojk Turbyfill, Resolutions - Betty Woods, 
Obituaries, Clerk. Christian Higher Education - open. 
Moved to accept as nominated. Seconded and approved. 

Moved to approve budget as presented. Seconded and 
approved. 

Roy Gryder asked for access to extra funds in case of 
an emergency situation arising on the N. Y. Mission Trip. 
Moved, seconded and approved. 

Suggested to be thinking about discontinuing each church 
paying for minutes separately and let this be included 
in the associational budget. 

Fred Luncford would like to do an associational conference 
on care-giving for people who cannot go to church such as 
home-bound, rest home residents, etc. Date will be 
announced later. 
11:10 Director of Missions Report - George Berry. Our 



16 



association impacts more lives than we realize. We have 
to preach to people who are there on Sunday. We have the 
best fellowship in this association than any I have ever 
been involved in. Pray for our pastors because they have 
the hardest job in the world. Don't ever give up! There 
are tourists, deaf people and retarded people who need our 
ministry. Let's keep working together. If you need my 
help or help from someone else, call. 

11:20 Annual Message - Arvil Hardy. Exodus 17:8-10. We have to 
be faithful to the work God has called us to do but we have 
to be aware that the devil will always be there to tempt 
us. We need to stand on the mountain and watch God's 
children fight the battle in the valley. If you are going 
to serve God, you have to believe that the Bible is his 
word. The world consists of those who do not know God and 
that is why they do the things they do. People do not want 
to know about hell, but it is better for you to tell them 
than to have them stand in hell and point their finger at 
you and say "you never told me". When Amalek comes, God 
will give us the strength to fight him. One of these days, 
we will walk down the streets of Glory and see the Lamb we 
have served. 

12:00 Prayer 

Ad j ournment 
Lunch 



17 



REPORTS 




1 



Financial Report 
for 

STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Annual Meeting 
August 11,1995 





Balance August 


1. 


1994: 


Contributions from 


churches for year: 






--Bailey's Camp 


$ 600 , 


. 00 






--Doe Ridge 


327 . 


00 


( 


$ 50 min) 


--Laytown 


400 , 


. 00 


( 


85 " ) 


--Long Ridge 


700 . 


, 00 






--Mt. Ephriam 


570. 


. 00 


( 


20 '■ ) 


--Rock Spring 


1717. 


, 52 


( 


40 " ) 


--Sandy Flat 


1565, 


. 91 


( 


100 " ) 


Other: 










--Sue Fitzgerald 


20 , 


. 00 






--Brazil Rebate 


66. 


,00 






--Offerings and donations for 








New York Mission 


372. 


75 








$6339. 


18 







Total Contributions: -^6339. 18 

$11674. 72 



Expenditures : 






--George Berry (Travel) 


$3000. 


. 00 


--Annuity (G. Berry) 


624. 


00 


--Linda Mills (Clerk Honorarium) 


250 , 


.00 


--Edith Gryder ( Treas . Honorarium) 


250. 


,00 


--Precision Printing (Minutes) 


272. 


.65 


--Convention Expense (G. Berry) 


100. 


.00 


--File Cabinet (G. Berry) 


29 


. 11 


--Checks 


19. 


,95 


--Postage 


24, 


.40 


--Telephone 


58. 


, 64 


--Fred Lunsford (M Night speaker) 


50 


.00 


--Sharon Kephart(" ' " ) 


25. 


,00 


--Fred Lunsford (Evang. speaker) 


125 


.00 


--Baptistry for Trinity Baptist 


900. 


,00 


(rhurch--New York 






--New York Mission 


345 


. 33 




$6074 


.08 



Total Expenditures 
•Total Balance in Treasure 8/1/95: 

Total in New York Mission Fun4: 

Total in Association General Fund: 



-6074.08 
$5600. 64 

1046. 42 

$4554 . 22 



18 



Stony Fork Baptist Association 
Approved Budget 
for 





1995-1996 




Director of Kis:-3ion3: 


$3000. 


, 00 


Anniiit7 for Dir. of Mis: 


900 . 


. 00 


Clerk honorarium: 


250 . 


00 


Treasurer honorarium: 


2 50 . 


. CO 


VBS: 


200 . 


00 


Disciple.ship Training; 


150 


. 00 


Evangel ism : 


125. 


, 00 


Evangelism Conference: 


200. 


.00 


WMU: 


150. 


,00 


Convention (2 persons): 


200 . 


. 00 


Clerical : 


50. 


,00 


Phone : 


75. 


.00 


Total : 


$5550. 


00 



19 




J) Foreign 

yVlission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention 

Jerry A. Rankin, President • P.O. Box 6767 • 3806 Monument Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 23230-0767 • (804) 353-0151 

June 29, 1995 



Mr. George Berry 
Director of Missions 
Route 1 , Box 3 1 8 
Sugar Grove, NC 28679 

Dear George: 

I know you share the Biblical imperative of reaching the whole world with the gospel. More 
Southern Baptists are needed to work with 4000 foreign missionaries on a short-term basis to 
jach this goal. VOLUNTEERS are making a difference overseas. 

Volunteerism is growing, as those who take on a "hands on" approach to their missions 
commitment make tremendous contributions with our missionaries. In the 12-year period ending 
in 1988, there were nearly 60,000 Southern Baptists who went beyond our borders to work on 
volunteer projects. In the past six years, ending in 1994, almost 65,000 volunteers helped in 
thousands of projects. Untold thousands have come to know Christ and have been ministered to 
by volunteers. You may be one of them and personally know of others. 

The role of the VOLUNTEER has taken on increased meaning and emphasis over the last few 
years among the Foreign Mission Board trustees, administration and field personnel. The 
Volunteers In Missions Department has the task of coordinating projects, as well as keeping the 
challenge before Southern Baptists. Because of this task, George, I want you to know of our 
desire to share this information with your pastors and their congregations. There are various 
ministry opportunities available through the FMB. What we need is an invitation to share the 
message of volunteerism, including current field needs and conditions with your association, 
pastors and churches. There will be no financial obligation on your part. Will you be able to 
assist us in this vital task? I look forward to hearing fi^om you. 

Thank you for your leadership, prayers and all you do for missions. If we can assist you, the 
association, the pastors and churches with this exciting ministry opportunity, please contact me 
at 1-800-999-3113, ext. 524. 

As He leads. 
Bob McEachem 

Associate Director, Asia and the Pacific 
Volunteers In Missions Department 

BM:rj 



Your bridge to the world . 

20 



for 1 50 years 



Foreign Mission Board 

Foreign missions is not the mere work of men but the mission of God in wiiich man participates 
it is far broader and deeper than anything we may have imagined. To take part means becoming 
part of a world mission, reaching beyond traditional walls, proclaiming God's Word to all mankind. 

I am proud to report of the progress of the F.M.B. Our Lottie Moon Chiistmas offering was the 
largest percentage increase since 1988. 

New church started was increased . 

Chui-ch membership is just below the 4,000,000 mark. 

Our churches in 1994 totals from overseas Baptists are well over 35,000 

More than 9,000 people professed faith in Christ following Impacto '94 in Buenos Aires, 

Argentina, late last year., according to missionary Richard Carter. Several himdred Baptists from 

I I coimtries worked in the out-reach event. 

We have just looked at the present. Now let us look into the future and see what the Foreign 
Mission Board has to otfer to us by the way of computer users we are able through the Foreign 
Mission Board New world wide electronic prayer net-work,, Compassion Net. 
Compassion Net will contain prayer "folders" for every country where Southern Baptist 
missionaries serve, as well as for many unreached people groups and megacities. It is now 
available. For example, a missionary in Indonesia could fax an ui^ent prayer need to the prayer 
office, and this request would be available to intercessors the same day through the network. 

In closing the F.M.B. has a vision statement to move us toward the 21st century. 

A vision is what keeps it moving toward that identifiable objective. I believe a vision will allow iw 

to go beyond what would otherwise be perceived as limitations or obstacles. 

It's simple Proverbs (29;!8) which says, "Where there is no vision, the people perish." 

It is not our mission,but God's. 

Our vision should be an im^e of projects for the future, why we do it and where it is all leadii^ us. 
So let us pray and support our F.M.B. to evangelizing the lost,discipling bclicvcrs,planting and 
developing churches, ministering to human needs .So let us envision the future result being all the 
peoples of the world being brought into a personal saving relationship with Jesus Christ. 

John McCoury 



22 







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23 



Home Missions 

In less than five years, a new number will click into 
place on the worlds odometer. We donot have a prediction 
for the future, but we want to share with you our great 
hope. We hope that in the year 2000 we will have shared €he 
gospel of Jesus Christ with every person in the United 
States. 

The H.M.B. Evangelism Section plans to involve the 
entire Southern Baptist personal witnessing, the primary 
method will be personal witnessing, with each church focus- 
ing on reaching its ministry area. These personal witnessing 
effort will be supplemented by a nationwide media campaign; 
stories and advertisement in magazines and newspapers. 

We expect that 1999 will be the greatest year of 
harvest our world has ever seen. We look forward to a 
crusade beamed by satellite around the world. 

The numbers of volunteers for home missions work 
increased almost 10 percent in 1994 over 1993. 

Home Missions touch lives all over our country. We 
must remember to keep them in our prayers. 

Annie Armstrong Easter Offering Receipts were up one 
half million dollers this year. 

Submitted by 

Vera Dula 



24 



ro 




Every Christian 
A Missionary 



Missions, in the minds of many 
Baptists, is something that happens 
somewhere else, either in another country 
("foreign") or in another pan of our 
country ("home"). The Lottie Moon 
Christmas Offering (foreign missions) 
and Annie Armstrong Easter Offering 
(home missions) are major emphases on 
most churches' calendar. 

Missions, in the minds of many 
Baptists, is also something that involves 
someone else. When most Baptists think 




Women inmates who come to Camp Mundo 
Vista see and feel God's love. Retreats for them 
and their children, part of the ongoing min- 
istries ofWMU, are supported by your gifts to 
the North Carolina Missions Offering. 

of missions, they usually think of mis- 
sionaries — a special group of people who 
have been appointed or commissioned 
by a denominational agency. 

Missions, in New Testament times, 
knew no such distinctions between "for- 
eign" and "home." Every first century 
Christian was a missionary, not just Paul 
or Barnabas or John or Peter. The bibli- 
cal mandate to go and preach the gospel 
belonged to every believer, not just those 
in "full-time" Christian service. 

North Carolina Missions is based 
on the belief that every Christian is a 
missionary. North Carolina is a mission 
field. Your county, your town, your 



neighborhood all contain a variety of 
mission challenges. And you, a 
Christian believer, are potentially a mis- 
sionary there. 

North Carolina Missions, and the 
annual North Carolina Missions 
Offering, takes seriously this mandate to 
help every believer find their place of 
ministry. Most of the annual offering is 
allocated to the state convention's 
Missions Division, Woman's Missionary 
Union and NC Baptist Men. In fact, 
virtually 90 percent of WMU's entire 
mission budget comes from this single 
offering. Baptist Men also depends 
entirely on this special offering for their 
mission budget. The 
Missions Division 
funds most of their 
missions program from 
this offering. 

Language 
Missions is a good 
example of North 
Carolina Missions. 
Twenty-five years ago 
there were only two or 
three Spanish-speaking 
churches in the state. 
Today, on a typical 
Sunday, North 
Carolina Baptists wor- 
ship in 1 8 different languages in 11 1 
churches. 

North Carolina WMU sponsors 
special retreats for female prison inmates 





Language Missions, receives 
JS percent of its funding from 
the NC Missions Offering. 



Disaster Relief is one of 13 NC Baptist Men m g 
that are funded by the NC Missions Offering. 

and their children. This may be the only 
opportunity this mother has for quality 
time with her children dur- 
ing her entire prison stay. 

NC Baptist Men sup- 
ports Disaster Relief and the 
Medical/Dental Bus. In 
1994, moredian 1,500 . 
North Carolina Baptists 
participated in some phase 
of Disaster Relief. The 
Medical/Dental Bus, a self- 
contained and fully opera- 
tional medical and dental 
care unit, was in 94 areas 
across North Carolina last 
year, involving over a thou- 
sand volunteers ministering 
to well over 2000 people. 

The mission field is here. And you, 
along with a host of other volunteers, are 
our missionaries. 




^' "Offering Help And Hope 



NC Missions Week Of Emphasis; September 10-17, 1995 



26 



1995 Report: Baptist Children's Homes of North Carolina 

Michael C. Blackwell, President 

H. Lee Davis, Jr. Chairman of Trustees 

For six-year-old Malinda, darkness brought sleepless nights listening to her mother's boyfriend beat her 
brother and sister - and praying she wouldn't be next, watching her mom choose her lover's whims over her 
children's needs, and finally, being abandoned on Christmas Eve in pouring rain on a dirt road. 

Her darkness, more than just a light switch clicked off, swirled with pain, fear, confusion and despair. 

Today, a bright-eyed teenager living at Broyhill Home, one of four Baptist Children's Homes residential 
campuses, Malinda finally sees light. After becoming a Christian in 1992, she can forgive her mom and let go 
of her painful past. "Learning to deal with my issues is a lot easier since 1 became a Christian," said Malinda. 
"I'm happy here at Broyhill. The people believe in me, support me and are here for me." 

Believing in children and families, offering light to pierce their darkness has been Baptist Children's 
Homes' goal since its beginning 110 years ago. 

Serving 1,513 chilaren and families in 1993-94 in 12 facilities across the state, BCH provides 
intentionalized programs of residential group care, emergency care, therapeutic camping, maternity care, 
teenage mother/babies, model day care and behavioral change for girls. Gaston County emergency care 
cottages in Dallas, operated on a yearly contract basis, were not renewed with BCH following Gaston 
County's decision to change the facilities' direction to a level of service BCH doesn't provide. 

Commemorating 110 years of ministry, BCH published Intent to Saue, a history depicting the last decade 
of BCH's child-centered, family-focused services. Each church was to receive a complimentary copy in the 
Fall of 1995. 

Founded in 1970, the Baptist Maternity Home in Asheville celebrated in October 25 years serving over 900 
young, unmarried, pregnant women who were given a quiet, supportive atmosphere to make decisions about 
their future. 

A chapter of BCH life closed with the death of alumni, employee and friend Bill Sisk. Investing 52 years 
of himself, Sisk, who came to Mills Home at age 8 and returned to work on staff 42 years, died May 21, 1995. 
"An era has passed," said BCH President Michael C. Blackwell. "It's extremely unlikely Baptist Children's 
Homes will ever see another individual who invests himself so fully in this place as did my friend Bill Sisk." 

Adding to the light. Baptist churches, through the Cooperative Program, designated gifts and the 
Thanksgiving Offering funded about one-fourth of BCH's $12 million budget with gifts totaling $2,934,304. 

Trustee Jim Goldston held his sixth annual Goldston's Carnival for Children raising $28,633 and 
providing two fun-packed days of rides, games, entertainment and food for children and area residents. 
"There is nothing more important in this life than children," said Goldston. "This is just one thing we can do 
to show our commitment, to put our feet to our prayers." 

Putting words into action described numerous individuals who gave time and effort with special campus 
work projects. 

This year, the Friends of Children committee added a twist to their annual spring bus tour by pulling on 
gloves and v/crk clothes to help beautif)' Odum Heme in Pembroke and Cameron Boys Camp near Southern 
Pines. 

A team of volunteers from Denver Baptist Church worked at Broyhill Home clearing brush, painting 
inside a cottage and building a storage shed; and at Kennedy Home tearing down an old gym built in the 
1930' s, restructuring an old piciuc shelter into an arts and crafts center, removing old heating equipment from 
Biggs cottage and renovating family conference rooms in the new gym. 

"We pray about these kids, and we pray that we will be an example," said Allen Holmes, Denver 
Baptist's mission trip coordinator. "This is more important than any building or construction work." 

Trustees, intent on strengthening BCH's leadership position and continuing its tradition of giving light to 
families and children, approved a $10.1 milUon campaign, "Light Their Way," to raise money for special 
projects, operational needs and endowment. The campaign will run September 1995 - May 1997. 

Many children, like Malinda, suffer in darkness. Many families linger in pain waiting for answers, 
waiting for help. Because of Baptists' support, BCH is able to "Light Their Way," offering hope, security and 
love. 



27 



Making Life for Older Adults ... 

The Best of Times 



As a result of the wonderful support 
given by North Carolina Baptists, 1995 
will be remembered as one of the finest 
years in the forty-four year history of the 
Baptist Retirement Homes of North 

^pc. TTis follcv-'in^ are sor^e 
highlights from the year: 

In recognition of its commitment to 
the spiritual well-being of the 
residents that it senses, Baptist 
Retirement Homes hired Luther 
Osment of Sylva, North Carolina 
as its first fiill-time Chaplain. 
Reverend Osment 's work 
responsibilities include ministry to 
the residents of the Brookridge 
Retirement Community in Winston- 
Salem and the Western North 
Carolina Baptist Home in 
Asheville. 

Reaffirming its commitment to the 
idea that retirement should be a 
''step up" for Older Adults, the final 

r.f tbf *'r'nry'fifi^*i of The 

Taylor House Facility in Albemarle 
was completed in the Fall of 1995. 
The renovation of The Hamilton 
Baptist Home in Martin County 
was also begun in 1995 and 
hopefully will be completed by year 
end. Wlien the renovation of The 
Hamilton Baptist Home is 
completed, all of the facilities 
operated by the Baptist Retirement 
Homes will be "state-of-the-art." 

In recognition of the changing 
profile of institutionalized Older 
Adults (47% of the "oldest old" in 
North Carolina suffer from some 



form of dementia), the Young 
Solarium addition was completed 
in the Fall of 1995. The Young 
Solarium will house a new small- 
group program designed to enhance 
tiic c^ua^-ity oj ujc cxpenenceci oy 
institutionalized Older Adults 
suffering from dementia. 

In an effort to provide Older Adults 
with affordable care, a sub-acute 
unit was developed at the Prince 
Nursing Care Center in Wmston- 
Saiem ... a unit where frail Older 
Adults can receive IV therapy, 
infusion, wound care, and stroke 
and bone fracture rehabilitation 
outside of a hospital setting. 

In response to the need to provide 
quality long-term care services to 
the ever growing number of frail 
Baptist Older Adults who may not 
need institutionalized care, the 
Baptist Retirement Homes 
developed a new home and 
community based service program, 
In Home Care, Inc. . ... the new 
service designed primarily to extend 
the amount of time that frail 
Baptist Older Adults can remain in 
the home environment. 



Thank you North Carolina Baptists for 
helping us make Hfe for Older Adults . . . 
The Best of Times! 

William B. Stillerman 
President 
Baptist Retirement Homes 
of North Carolina, Inc. 



28 



Meeting the 
Challenges of 
Health Care 

1995 



Jyeport to 

the Associations 




"Touching Uves With Hope" 



founded in 1922, Baptist 
Hospital is a missionary enterprise 
I of the Baptist churches of North 
Carolina. The essence of our pur- 
pose is to carry out a ministry of 
healing as taught by Jesus Christ, 
'e remain as fully committed to this 
mission as were our founding 
fathers. In the midst of changing 
mlth-care norms, we have not, nor 
will we, deviate from this mission. 
The following paragraphs report 
not only basic facts, but various 
results of how we have sought in 
the last year to remain true to our 
heritage while providing quality 
health care at affordable prices. 



"THE BAPTIST" 

.affectionately known to many simply as "The Baptist", our hospital now employs 
5,544 members who comprise our healing team. We are joined with Bowman Gray 
School of Medicine and thus The Medical Center has over 9,000 employees making 
us the largest employer in Forsyth County. In fiscal year 1994-'95, our 806-bed 
facihty provided care for 23,712 inpatient admissions. Our rapidly growing Outpa- 
tient Department provided care for 557,51 1 patient visitors. 

A NEW DIVISION: PASTORAL CARE AND CHURCH RELATIONS 
In May restructuring created a new division with the consoUdation of the departments 
of Pastoral Care and Church/Community Relations. This division consists of four 
ministry components which are Usted below with a brief ministry synopsis: 

DEPARTMENT OF CHAPLAINCY AND PASTORAL EDUCAnON 

Through spiritual and emotional healing to patients, families and staff, approximately 55,000 

ministries were provided by our chaplains. 

THE CENTER FOR CONGREGAHONAL HE\LTH 

This rapidly e.xpanding ministry to churches, pastors and staff, and congregational 
leaders also enables die training of intentional interim pastors. Also, training is 
provided for leadership and church consultants. Workshops and odier events are 
held as well. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHURCH AND DENOMINATIONAL REUTIONS 
This department serves as the liaison between Baptist Hospital and die churches, 
associations, and convention, as well as other church groups. By facihtating 
appointments, poUcy interpretation, understanding of our health care services, this 
hinction helps keep our vital bond with Nordi Carohna Baptists strong. Mission 
dollars for benevolent care through this department in excess of $452,000 were 
given by Baptists to the Mother s Day Offering. This mission effort helps reUeve the 
financial burdens of patients who have htde or no healthcare insurance. This is truly 
a ministry of renewing hope in their lives and is a source of great joy for us. 

PASTORAL COUNSEUNG 

With increasing requests from churches and associations across the state, this 
ministry continues to expand. Our diirteen strategically located counseling centers 
provided 27,000 ministry hours last year. 



rhe North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated 

29 



"Touching Lives With Hope" 



Thank You Letters 
From Mother s Day 
Offering Recipients 

"I would like to take this opportunity to 
tell you how grateful 1 am for the 
generous contribution made to help me 
with my recent medical expenses. 1 have 
been extremely concerned as to how this 
account would be settled. I never 
dreamed that such a fund was available. 
To all Southern Baptists across the state 
of North Carolina, I sincerely thank 
them for their generosity and concern 
for my well-being. This gift has defi- 
nitely lightened my life's load. The 
gratitude I have in my heart is difficult 
to express on paper, but truly 
one deeply appreciated. " 

"Please accept my sincere appreciation 
for the financial assistance you and 
Southern Baptists contributed toward my 
late husband's hospital bill This was a 
gracious gesture on your part that truly 
helped lighten the financial burden left 
to me due to his extended illness. 
A gift of this magnitude will not be 
forgotten by me or my family. Through 
all this ordeal my faith in God has been 
unshaken, and your kindness only 
strengthens that faith. " 



POINTS OF EXCELLENCE AND PROGRESS 

• FINANCIAL STEWARDSHIP - Annually Baptist Hospital's rate increases consistently 
are less than both the medical consumer price index for hospitals and general 
inflation. The most recent North Carolina Database Commission report comparing 
the average of charges at other instate academic medical centers for our most 
frequent diagnoses reveals our charges are 21% lower. For all hospitals statewide 
we are 7.7% lower on those same charges, despite treating the most critically ill 
patients from across the state. 

• QualChoice OF NORTH CAROLINA - A managed care plan providing quahty health- 
care and patient physician choice. Estabhshed by The North Carohna Baptist 
Hospitals, Incorporated and Bowman Gray School of Medicine and Wake Forest 
University, QualChoice is now expanding to employers in our region. 

• ACCREDITATION WITH COMMENDATION - This distincUon was awarded us by the 
Joint Commission of Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. With a grade of 
96 we earned the distinction as one of America's most highly rated hospitals. 

• EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT/DIETARY BLTLDLNG - Widi a Fall 1995 opening date 
this 300,000 square foot facility will expand our Emergency Department capacity 
to 70,000 visitors annually It will also house a 35-bed Day Hospital, as well as a 
900-seat cafeteria, and will double the proportion of private beds available to 
patients. 

• COMPREHENSIVl OUTPATILNT REHABIUTAnON FACIUH - A 64,000 square foot 
faciUty scheduled for completion in the Summer of 1996. 

• STICHT CENTER ON AGING AND REHABlUTAnON - Housing a geriatric research 
and education center, geriatric day hospital and inpatient acute rehab beds, gero- 
psychiatry, and adult acute psychiatry, a planned completion and opening date for 
this center is the Spring of 1996. 

• HOME HEALTH SOLUTIONS AND HOME HEALTH SPECIAUSTS - Specialists provide 
at home care such as intravenous chemotherapy, pain management, nursing care, 
and physical and occupational therapy 

• COMMUMTY HOSPITAL ASSISTANCE - Baptist Hospital continues to develop 
relationships with hospitals and physicians in other communities inviting them to 
join our expanding healthcare delivery system. 



A CLOSING WORD 

Historical methods of deUvering healdicare are changing in significant ways. We are 
constandy seeking to position ourselves to develop the methodologies, services, and 
dehvery systems to meet these challenges. In the midst of die multiplicity of changes 
remain several treasured, time tested constants. Among diese are our commitinent 
to excellence and compassion in providing care, the demonstrated support of North 
Carohna Baptists, and most significandy, the providence of our Lord. Trusting in 
these, we move forward boldly and confidentiy into the future. 

Respectfully submitted. 



Len B. Preslar, Jr. 
President 

The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated 
30 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST FOUNDATION, INC 



1995 ANNUAL REPORT 

The messengers present at the Baptist State Convention meeting 75 years ago, when 
the establishment of the Baptist Foundation was approved, believed that the services to 
be provided by the Foundation could benefit both the individuals who would use its 
services as well as Christian purposes for which the Convention had organized many years 
earlier. 

With a well trained and dedicated staff, the Baptist Foundation is now in position 
to assist any Baptist church member who has a desire to preserve their estate for their 
families and provide greater financial service to their church, association, missions. Baptist 
institutions or the Convention in its program of work. 

Those who have become involved with the Foundation thus far, many of whom no 
longer are alive today are providing critically needed resources for either their family 
members and/or the Christian causes they dearly love. In many instances their use of a 
trust or endowment fund has helped reduce income and/or estate taxes and increased the 
value of assets they left for their families at their death. In addition, they continue to 
provide for sharing the Gospel with the income from endowment funds they created while 
they were living. 

Many North Carolina Baptists are today enjoying the benefit of increased 
retirement income through the creation of an annuity trust with the transfer of property 
or other assets which the Foundation sold and invested under guidance of professional 
managers. When these trusts were created, the individuals were provided tax benefits 
which enhanced their estates. In most cases, the income they now receive is greater than 
that received prior to starting the trust. At some future date of their choosing, the assets 
in trust will serve the Lord in ways chosen by the donors. 

During the past year, an area manager was employed to serve the western portion 
of the state. A twelve-minute video, "Pillars of the Church", was prepared which shares 
through personal example how the Foundation can serve every church member. A copy 
of this video is available by request in writing to 201 Convention Drive, Cary, North 
Carolina 27511. Personal and confidential assistance is available by calling our office at 
919-380-7334 or written request directed to the above address. 

The total assets under management by the Foundation at the end of 1994 were 
$47,312,575. A total of $1,241,756 was paid to Baptist churches, institutions and mission 
causes during 1994. The amount paid to individuals from trusts, which will eventually pay 
to Baptist causes, was $1,499,098 during the year. During the first six months of 1995, 
the total performance of the charitable endowment funds under management was 15.3% 
(annualized). 

Edwin S. Coates, Executive Director 
W. Jesse Spencer, Chairman of the Board 



31 




JOURNAL OF THE BAPTIST STATE CONVENTION OF NORTH CAROLINA 
P.O. BOX 26568 • RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 2761 1 



R G Puckell. Editor 



MEMORANDUM 
7.12.95 



TO: 



Associational Leaders 



FROM: 



Editor R.G. Puckett 



RE: 



Biblical Recorder report for annual meeting 



Attached is a copy of the report for the Biblical Recorder to your 
association for the annual meeting in 1995. 

As it has been done for years, the report has been designed so that you 
may photocopy it for inclusion in your book of reports. Some may choose to 
reproduce the page and distribute it individually to the messengers. Some 
associations have indicated they would like for the Recorder to supply an 
adequate number of copies for the annual meeting. We can do that, if you 
will notify us. 

The SBC '95 in Atlanta confirmed once again that this is a most 
sensitive and transitional time in Southern Baptist history. The 
controversy in the national convention has created much pain and stifled the 
progress of our cooperative Baptist work as was evidenced by the Brister 
Committee report, particularly as it relates to Woman's Missionary Union. 
The conflict is now damaging some churches as congregations must choose what 
they will do in response to the national convention crisis and it could 
conceivably damage the associations and the Baptist State Convention. 

It goes without saying that never has there been a greater need for 
Baptists to be informed. They must have facts and not be making decisions in 
a vacuum or based on hearsay. Despite the fact we have access to so much 
information, there is still a great amount of misunderstanding and 
misinformation circulating. Never a week, and hardly a day, passes without 
calls or letters to the Recorder asking for information (and often 
documentation) on some erroneous perception or misguided issue which have 
potential for harming Baptists. We are always glad to help. 

The Recorder needs your help and you will be helping the entire Baptist 
family as we inform and enlist others in the Great Commission which has been 
given to each of us as disciples and our churches. 

We can supply you with a computer printout of the number of subscribers 
in each church in your association, if that would be helpful to you in the 
promotion of subscriptions. If I can help you in any way to inform Baptists 
better, please call or write. 



32 



Editorial ■ (919) 847-2127 



Circulation & Business - (919) 847-2128 



THE BIBLICAL RECORDER 



Associational Report — 1995 

The headlines each day — Bosnia, O.J. Simpson, interest rates, tax 
overhaul, etc. — often include Southern Baptists. The secular media show 
special interest in our conflicts but all too often do not tell the whole 
story of the good things Baptists are doing. The Biblical Recorder tells the 
whole story — the many positive things people are doing in their churches 
along with the negative issues which cannot be concealed and ignored if we 
honor our heritage from yesterday and fulfill our mission for tomorrow. 

There is no way to address these issues without correct and reliable 
information. The Biblical Recorder was born and continues to serve for that 
purpose. In the 162 years of state Baptist papers in North Carolina, never 
was the Recorder more needed than now for people to have the truth. 

People are reading less than any time in recent history. It is true of 
secular publications, it is true of wholesome books from respected 
libraries, it is true of religious publications. We live in an electronic 
age where many think they know the answers to the issues only to discover 
they do not. It is impossible to know in depth what is happening when we 
depend on "60-second sound bites" of news on television or radio. 

An informed Baptist is a better Baptist; an uninformed Baptist may be 
an uninvolved or disruptive Baptist. No democracy, including our local 
churches, can survive long without an informed, involved constituency which 
makes decisions based upon accurate information from reliable sources. 

The Biblical Recorder should be in every Baptist home in North 
Carolina. Your support as a subscriber and reader, coupled with your 
encouragement to others, will enable the paper to better serve the 
constituency with accurate and helpful information. 

In order to save churches large amounts of money and to increase the 
readership of the Recorder , Church News Service (CNS) was launched in 1990. 
This system lets any congregation have their church news incorporated into 
the Biblical Recorder which saves staff time, postage and printing 
costs. Usually, for less than what it costs to produce the church 
newsletter, CNS gives the entire Baptist communication package to each 
family in the congregation. Recent and anticipated increases in mailing 
costs makes CNS a greater value in 1995-96 than when it was started in 1990. 

The paper focuses more and more attention on North Carolina Baptists 
with news, features and inspirational articles which will encourage in- 
dividuals and churches in their witness and ministry. One sure way to 
conquer problems and overcome the barriers to effective witness and ministry 
is to have the facts, know the issues and be adequately informed. With all 
the stress and disturbance in the world, "The North Carolina Baptist Way" 
has become even more important to us than ever before. 

That is why the Recorder was born; that is why it serves today. For 
more information on how your church can subscribe or use CNS, contact: 

The Biblical Recorder 
232 West Millbrook Road 
Raleigh, NC 27609 
(919) 847-2127 
33 



Stewardship Report 
for 

STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Annual Meeting 
August 12, 1995 



The members of the churches in the Gtoney Fork Baptist 
association gave a total of $134,240 to the churches in the 
fiscal year ending Aug. 1, 1995. This is the largest amount 
that our people have ever given in a single year. This is 
also the largest increase (1.1:%) over the previous year that 
we have seen since 1991. The members of our seven churches 
have been most generous in their giving to support the work 
of the Lord. 

Ail too often a report must give the bad news along with 
the good. There is a sad note to this report to go along with 
the good news. Total giving to missions for 1995 was $37,503. 
This is the smallest amount that the Association has 
contributed to missions since 1991. 

We must ask ourselves why our people have lost some of 
their enthusiasm for the support of mission work. In view of 
their total giving it is certain that our brothers and 
sisters are v.'illing to contribute to the churches. So why are 
they reluctant to send their funds to the mission field? 
What reason is there for this drop in mission giving? 

I would like to humbly submit that perhaps we here today 
are the ones who must accept a large part of the 
re.'sponsibility for the decline in mission giving. We who are 
active in the work of the Association would never 
deliberately do anything to weaken the works of missions but 
still, in all fairness, we must examine ourselves. 

In the past few years we have seen our people respond 
with willingness and generosity when we have presented them 
witn a clear cut and realistic need to be filled. Any time 
that we have gone to the churches with a well defined and 
well planned mission project they have provided us with the 
necessary means to carry out the plans. They have never 
failed us. 

Is it possible that we have failed them by not providing 
them a continued series of serious and needful projects to 
help us work on? Do we not receive because we do not ask? It 
seems to me like it is the duty of every one of us to look at 
every mission opportunity that we are told of or read about- 
to ask ourselves is there a person, church, or group who 
would have the me.ans to fill this need. We might all be 
surprised at the results of a prayerful effort to match the 
resources we have with the needs we see. 

Respectfully Submitted 
Roy C Gryder 

34 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
OR 

WOMEN ON MISSION 



The changes coming in and to WMU are many but our calling is 
unchanged. Although we are soon to be "Women on Mission", our goal 
will continue to be to educate our church members about the mission 
work of our denomination at each age level, boys and girls, men and 
women. We will continue to love, pray for and support our Southern 
Baptist work. 

Our watchword this year, found in 1 Thessalonians 3:12, says "may 
the Lord make your love for one another and for all people grow 
more and more". I can see that Stony Fork Woman's Missionary 
Unions have done that over the past year from the reports I 
received, continuing to be very active in their churches and 
communities . 

In addition to promoting and supporting the Annie Armstrong Easter 
Offering and the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering in our churches to 
spread the word around the world, we have continued to work in our 
local communities as well. Some of the things our ladies have 
undertaken include contacting a missionary family in Benin, West 
Africa, finding out some needs and supplying them, buying shoes and 
having a household shower for one of the members, remembering the 
women in the Ukraine in prayer on the 24th day of each month, 
providing Royal Service to all the members, providing funds for 
personal items for rest home residents displaced by a fire in their 
facility, providing meals in homes where there has been a death, 
fixing and serving meals for Hospice residents each month, baby 
showers for new mothers, giving flowers and gift baskets to shut- 
ins and elderly at Christmas and having numerous fund-raisers to 
provide extra funds for all these activities 

God has truly blessed us, making it possible for us to meet the 
needs of those less fortunate. I am so proud to be a Woman on 
Mission and to be involved in God's work through this organization. 



Linda Mills 

Stony Fork Assoc. WMU Director 



35 




July, 1995 




I 

z 

UL 

BAi'TIST STATE CONVENTION Of NC 








MEMORANDUM 

To: Directors of Associational Missions 

From: T. Robert MuUinax 

Subject: College Report for Associational Meetings 



We hope you can include the Council on Christian Higher Education's report in some way 
during your annual meeting. 

Two copies are enclosed : (1) One for you, and (2) one for your Christian higher 
education representative, if you have one. 

If you wonid like to invite a college person to be on program, you can write or call 
any of the persons listed below. They will gladly hdp you. 

Call on us if we can help you. 

TRM/bhc 

Enclosures: 2 

Campbell Universitv. Buies Creek 27506 - Jerry Wood - (910-893-1200, ext 1222) 
Chowan Colleg e. Murfreeshoro 27855 - Tim Wilson - (919-398-4101, ext. 200) 
Gardner-Webb Universitv. Boiling Springs 28017 - W. Bruce Rabon - (704-454-4256) 
Mars Hill College. Mars Hill 28754 - Paula Clayton Dempsey - (704-689-1128) 
Meredith Colleg e. Raleigh 27607 - Sam Carothers - (919-829-8346) 
Wake Forest Universitv. Winston-Salem 27109- Lynn Parker -(910- 759-5225) 
Wingate Universitv. Wingale 28174 - Mike Hamilton - (704-233-8026) 



T. ROBERT MULLINAX, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR/ POST OFFICE BOX 1107 




I 



CARV, NORTH CNROUNA 27512-1107/ (919)467-5100/ (600)395-5102 



The Baptist State Convention is 165 years old. For 161 
of those years the Convention has been in the business 
of founding, adopting, supporting and nurturing 
Baptist colleges and universities. North Carolina 
Baptists are known for their broad and deep 
commitment to Christian higher education. Our seven 
Convention-related education institutions are: 
Campbell University, Chowan College, Gardner- Webb 
University, Mars Hill College, Meredith College, 
Wingate University and Wake Forest University. 

For 1995 the Convention's Christian higher 
education budget is $6,000,540, or 20.41 per cent of 
the total. These funds are divided among six colleges. 
Wake Forest is not in the budget, but receives 
designated gifts from churches and shares in student 
financial aid fimding through the State Missions 
Offering. 

The 1994 enrollment in North Carolina Baptist 
colleges and universities was 22,473, with 4,075 
graduates. Approximately 476 students were enrolled 
in church-related vocation studies. 



MMS mil mmm 



mm 



37 



VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 
REPORT 



It has been two years since anyone from our Association has 
attended the State Vacation Bible School Clinic. Our Association 
has not held an Associational Clinic for the past two years. From 
the reports I have received, the churches seem to have had very 
good attendance in Bible Schools. We used Southern Baptist 
materials in our schools and it was very adequate. If you have not 
sent your report in to me, you need to do so as soon as you can. 

Three churches reported with an average attendance of 128 total for 
the three churches - Bailey's Camp, Sandy Flat and Rock Spring. 



Barbara West 
VBS Director 



38 



Christian Action League of North Carolina, Inc. 
ANNUAL REPORT TO THE ASSOCIATIONS 



1995 

This year has been a significant one for the Christian Action League of N C as we 
gave leadership and support to local communities in their battle against the proliferation of 
alcohol, provided a voice for Christian morals and ethics in the halls of the legislature and 
continued our battle against on-going legislation concerning the lottery and other anti- 
family issues. 

L Legislative Issues: 

A. Alcohol 

The alcohol industry sought to implement state-wide Liquor-By-the-Drink and 
beer/wine sales through legislative action . House Bill 599 would have implemented LBD 
without a vote of the people. The Christian Action League prompted churches to action 
and strong opposition developed from across the state, the bill was withdrawn and died in 
committee. 

B. Lottery 

In the 1995 Session of the General Assembly, there were four lottery bills 
introduced. Several times in the past decade, gambling forces were able to secure the 
passage of a lottery measure in the Senate, but not in 1995. Lottery legislation was 
defeated in the Senate by a 28-20 vote. In the House, HB 838 (Lottery for School 
Buildings) was brought out of committee by an unusual parliamentary move and placed on 
the House calendar. Calls and Prayers from CAL members and the Christian community 
were honored when the measure was sent back to committee where it remained until the 
end of session. 

We praise the Lord for this victory and for the fact that N. C. remains the largest 
state in the nation that has no state-sponsored lottery. However, we request your prayers 
as the Christian Action League will continue to be on the front-line fighting this battle 
again in 1996. 

C. Abortion 

The Christian Action League and other Christian organizations have continuously 
lobbied for abolition of the state abortion fimd. House Bill 229 has passed and will cut the 
abortion funding from $1.2 million to $50,000 and then to be used only in cases of rape 
or incest. 



39 



For many years we have been working for legislation requiring Parental Consent 
before a minor can obtain an abortion. House Bill 481 was adopted this year providing 
this "common sense" legislation. 



D. Abstinence Education 

Another proposal that the Christian Action League has been working on became 
law this year. House Bill 834 (Teaching Abstinence Until Marriage) is pro-fanuly and 
supports biblical and moral values. This bill requires schools to offer a program 
encouraging abstinence until marriage and also provides for parental review of teaching 
materials before comprehensive sex education instruction can be implemented. 

2. League Leadership: 

Reverend Johnny R. Henderson became the League's Executive Director in July 
upon the retirement of Coy C. Privette. Johnny brings a wealth of experience to this 
position. A trustee since 1977, he is the North Carolina Baptist Men's Correctional 
Ministries Coordinator and serves on the Executive Committee of Prison Fellowship of 
North Carolina. Also, his church was featured on ABC News last year for its outstanding 
prison ministry. 

We are grateful to God for the prayer and financial support that the League 
receives from the churches of your association. May others join you as we seek to be the 
"Salt and Light" in a worid hostile to Biblical ethics and morality. 



Respectfully Submitted, 





Joe S. Lennon 
President 



40 



CHRISTIAN LIFE COMMISSION 
Southern Baptist Convention 
I 901 Commerce, Suite 550, Nashville, Tennessee 37203 

I Gary K. Ledbetter, Chairman 

I Richard D. Land, Executive Director-Treasurer 

ASSOCIATIONAL REPORT 

The Christian Life Commission's assignment from the Southern Baptist Convention is one of Christian moral development by 
emphasizing the application of the principles of the Christian faith in personal and public life. Effort is made to provide Christian 
ethics services to other Southern Baptist agencies, state conventions, associations, churches and individuals to enable Southern Bap- 
tists to deal with the serious moral challenges of our time. The Commission encourages the formation of Christian Life Committees 
at all levels of Southern Baptist life beginning with the local church. 

Through its Washington, D. C. office, open since 1987, the Commission has a moral leadership role in the nation's capital. The 
staff in Washington includes the Director of Government Relations, the Director of Media and News Information-Baptist Press Re- 
porter and the General Counsel-Director of Christian Citizenship and Religious Liberty Concerns. The Washington staff has sought to 
fulfill the program statement assigned to the Commission to "bring to bear Baptist statements, convictions and insights in Christian 
ethics and religious liberty upon important policy making groups"; and to "present Southern Baptist insight for consideration in the 
planning of federal government programs on children and youth, aging, housing, employment, public health and other matters 
pertaining to social welfare." 

During the past year, the Washington and Nashville staffs have worked diligently to st^are with Congress and the White House 
convictions and concerns of Southern Baptists. The staff has corresponded and met with members of both the legislative and executive 
branches of the federal government on areas of Southern Baptist concern. SalL a newsletter, is published six times a year to keep 
Southern Baptists informed on public policy and issues in the administrative, judicial and legislative branches of government 
Abortion, drug abuse and pornography are among the issues in which the staff has been involved in the past year. The continuing 
;oncem about serious threats to religious liberty posed by recent Supreme Court decisions has been the basis for the Commission to 
address both legislature and judicial concerns. The Commission continued filing amicus curiae , "friend of the court," briefs in cases 
involving areas within its program statement The Commission continued to call Southern Baptists to a greater understanding of the 
truth that our faith calls us to informed participation in our nation's political process. 

The 1995 annual national seminar, entitled "The War of the Worlds: The Struggle for America's Soul," was held at Southeastern 
Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, North Carolina, February 27-March 1, 1995. The seminar program combined interpre- 
tive biblical themes with addresses on subjects such as "What are World Views and Why They are Important?," "The Issue is Truth," 
The Struggle for the Right to Be Involved," "The Struggle for the Inner City," The Struggle for the Media" and 'The Battle for 
Human Life." The seminar also included a discussion of the public policy aspects of critical issues impacting the world. 

The Commission has been extremely active in the area of the sanctity of human life by publishing a wide range of materials to 
issist Southern Baptists in celebrating Sanctity of Human Life Sunday in January. The video, entitled "The Sanctity of Human Life," 
;on-tinues to be received enthusiastically by Southern Baptists. The Commission hosted a consultation on violence at abortion 
clinics in September 1994, which resulted in the publication, "Why Killing Abortion Doctors is Wrong: The Nashville Statement of 
[^on-science," which has generated considerable interest among Southern Baptists as well as news media. 

Commission staff also served as resource persons in events held in numerous state conventions as well as for other Southern Bap- 
ist agencies and entities. The Commission produced a video on race relations and continues to assist Southern Baptists in the obser- 
vance of Race Relations Sunday. The Commission also continued its assignment from the Convention for education and action on the 
lunger issue. The film, "What Shall We Do in a Hungry World?," continued to be used significantly lo heighten Southern Baptists' 
iwareness on this issue. 

The Commission produced a gambling video, entitled "Gambling: The Hidden Realities," which has been widely distributed by 
itate convention offices to associations in several states. The staff has been very active in providing information to state conventions, 
associations and local churches on the gambling issue. A new video was produced, entitled "Biles Like a Snake: Students Speak on 
Mcohol and E>rugs," that seeks to help churches warn young people about the dangers of alcohol and tobacco. 

The circulation of Light, the bimonthly moral concerns jouriial of the Commission, and Salt , 'he bimonthly newsletter produced 
Ji the Washington, D. C. office, continues to experience rapid growth. Circulation is currently around 91,150 for each. 

The Commission plans to undertake numerous initiatives during the years ahead. These include: expanding the Nashville and 
iVashington, D. C. staffs to increase its ability to fulfill its program statement; sponsoring seminars on the challenging moral and 
social issues of our time; implementing every means possible to inform, challenge and energize Southern Baptists to become involved 
^ith the vast array of moral and social issues confronting our society; and updating, revising and expanding literature and audio/video 
naterial available to Southern Baptists on moral and social issues. 

In reviewing its program activities for the past year, the Commission remains encouraged and faces the future with faith and hope 
in furthering the cause of applied Christianity among Southern Baptists. The trustees and staff solicit the prayers of Southern Baptists 
IS it seeks to discern the Lord's will and work in serving Southern Baptists. 

The Commission is committed to a complete Gospel for the complete person. It rejects any inherent conflict between the social 
ind salvation aspects of the Gospel. It was never intended that there should be a dichotomy between the two. The Commission be- 
iieves it is wrong to seek to feed the hungry and not tell them about the bread of life. It is shameful to seek to clothe the naked and 
not tell them about the whole armor of God. It is a disgrace to seek to house the homeless and not tell them that in our Father's house 
ire many man-sions. It is also less than complete obedience or full discipleship to proclaim salvation and not also seek to minister to 
people's earthly needs. 



41 



RESOLUTIONS 



Let it be resolved that the Stony Fork Association expresses its 
thanks and appreciation to Bailey's Camp and Doe Ridge Baptist 
Churches for their hospitality and delicious food. 

We would also like to express our thanks to God for the wonderful 
Christian fellowship and the excellent reports and speakers we have 
heard the past two days. 



Betty Woods 



OBITUARIES 



BAILEY'S CAMP - Mr. Stewart Ford 

DOE RIDGE - Mrs. Earlene Dyer, Mr. Gary Church 
LAYTOWN - Mr. William I. Dillard, Deacon 
MT. EPHRAIM - Mrs. Maxine Norris 
ROCK SPRING - Mrs. Doris Sanders 

SANDY FLAT - Mr. Billy Dean May, Mr. Albert Hayes, Mrs Addie Ward 
SPECIAL RECOGNITION - Miss Rosetta Hollifield 



42 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



Ycjr Churchn 


Moderator 


Clerk 


Preacher 


IS62 Ziont Gate Mceiuis 








HouM.Wilkct Co. 


Larkin Hodgct 


Larkin Pipci 


Elder Larkin Ha«g 


1163 Yellow Hill 


Larkin Hodgct 


Larkin Pipci 


Wilson Bradshaw 


IS64 Mtnuin were noi prinied, m«tw*cnpi goi losi. 






1865 Mt. EpOrum 


Larkin Hodgei 


I. R. Hodgct 


loseph Harrison 


1866 South ¥otk 


Larkin Hodges 


Eliiah Triveil 


Larkin Hodges 


1867 W4Uu(4 


Larkin Hodgct 


lamet Partont 


|. R. Carlton 


1868 'unkMi 


Larkin Hodgct 


lamet Partont 


lames Parsons 


1869 Sionv ^o^k 


Laf kin Hodgct 


lamct Partont 


W. H. Phillips 


1870 Old ^icid 


Larkin Hodgct 


lamet Partont 


William Wilcox 


1871 Elk 


Larkin Hodgct 


lamet Partont 


lames Parsons 


1873 Mt. Vemon 


Larkin Hodgct 


lamet Partont 


j. R. Carlton 


1873 Wiuufi 


Larkin Hodgct 


lamct Panom 


Larkin Hodges 


1874 Yellow Hill 


Larkin Hodgct 


William E. Greene 


lames Partont 


1875 Laurel Fork 


Larkin Hodgct 


William E. Greene 


Levi Wilson 


1876 Siony Fork 


Larkin Hodgct 


William E. Greene 


Larkin Hodges 


1877 Poplar Grove 


Larkin Hodgct 


Eliiah Trivetl 


lames Parsons 


1878 Old Field 


Larkin Hodgct 


William E. Greene 


). R. Carlton 


1879 Elk 


Larkin Hodgct 


William E. Greene 


Monroe Grau 


1880 Ml. Vemon 


Larkin Hodgct 


William E. Greene 


Monroe Grau 


1881 Waiauca 


Larkin Hodgct 


Eliiah Trivetl 


Levi Wilson 


1882 Ml. Ephriam 


J. F. Eller 


|ohn R. Hodges 


lames Parsons 


1883 Y liow Hill 


I. F. Eller 


Elijah Trivett 


Larkin Hodgct 


1884 BoortesFork 


Larkin Hodgct 


Thomas Pipet 


Larkin Pipes 


1885 Buffalo Cove 


t.F. Eller 


Thomas Pit>et 


|. F. Eller 


1886 Stony Fork 


E. M. Grau 


Wm.M. Lee 


E. M. Grau 


1887 Union 


E. M. Grau 


Wm. M. Lee 


David Eller 


1888 Laurel Fork 


lamet Partont 


Wm. M. Lec 


Wm. M. Lec 


1889 Poplar Grove 


F.M.Grau 


Wm. M. Lec 


|ohn F. Eller 


1890- Mt. Vernon 


E. M. Grao 


Wm.M. Lec 


E. M. Grau 


1891. Watauga 


E. M. Grau 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1893 Mt. Paran 


E. M. Grau 


Wm. M. Lec 


E. M. Grau 


1893 Boones Fork 


E. M. Grau 


Wm. M. Lec 


S. T. Carroll 


1894 Yellow Hilt 


E. M. Grau 


Wm.M. Lee 


lohn F. Elkr 


1895 New River 


E.M. Grau 


Wm.M. Lec 


Geo. W. Trivett 


1896 Elk 


E. M. Grau 


Wm.M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1897 Laurel Fork 


E. M. Grau 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lec 


1898 Buffalo Co9e 


).C. Miller 


Wm.M. Lee 


1. F. Davit 


1899 Mt. Vemon 


E. M. Grau 


R. H. Pipes 


|. 1. 1. Sherwood 


1900 Watauga 


E.M. Grau 


Wm. M. Lee 


D. C. Harman 


1901 Stony Fork 


|.C Miller 


Wm. M. Lec 


lohn Critp 


1902 Poplar Grove 


I.e. Miller 


A. I.Shull 


I.e. Blay lock 


1903 Boones Fork 


F. M. Grau 


Wm. M. Lec 


1 . C. Miller 


1904 Mt. Ephriam 


F.M.Grau 


Wm. M. Lec 


F. M. Grau 


1905 Mt. Paran 


E. M. Grau 


Wm.M. Lec 


Wm. M. Lec 


1906 Yellow Hill 


Thot. L. Oav 


Wm. M. Lec 


Au Brown 


1907 New River 


Thot. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


|. F. Davit 


1908 Middle Cane 


lamct F . Church 


Wm. M. Lec 


|. C. Millar 


1909 Elk 


That. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


1 . C. Miller 


1910 Laurel Fork 


That. L. Oav 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1911 Mt. Vernon 


Thot. L. Day 


Wm.M. Lec 


D. M. Whccicr 


1912 Poplar Grove 


Thot. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


R. F. Wilcox 


1913 Watauga 


Thot. L. Day 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1914 Mt. Epitriam 


Thot. L. Day 


Wm.M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lec 


1915 BoonesFork 


Thot. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


D. M. Wheeler 


1916 Rock Springs 


B. F. Wilcox 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lec 


1917 Mt. Paran 


B.F.Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1918 Due 10 the outbreak ol 


inlluen/a no Attociation was held. 






1919 Yellow Hill 


B.F.Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


B. F.Wilcox 


1920 Mt. Vernoo 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1921 Laurel Fork 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


0. M. Wheeler 


1922 Waiauga 


a. F.Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


Oscar Dcllinger 


1923 Poplar Gfu«e 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1924 BooneiKork 


B. F. Wilcox 


1 . Amos Hampton 


W. D. Ashley 


1925 Ml. Ephfum 


B. K. Wilcox 


|. Amos Hampton 


|. A. Hampton 


1926 Rock View 


O.M. Wheeler 


J. Amos Hampton 


G. M. Watson 



43 



1927 Eih 


0. M. Wheeler 


R. F. Wiicox 


A. C. Hamby 


1928 watiuf* 


0. M. Wheeler 


B. F. WUcex 


B. F. Wilcox 


■ Ai^A faa^u cist 

1929 Sandy mi 


0. M. Wheeler 


B. F. Wilcox 


C. M. Watson 


1930 Middle One 


W D Ashlev 


8. F. WilcoK 


Linney Barnes 


1931 Laurel Fork 


W O Ashlcv 


B. F. Wilcox 


B. F. Wilcox 


193* picw nwpcw«n 


G. M. Watson 


B. F.Wiicax 


|. T. McCuire 


• V^llMkM Mall 

i933 TfMOw mil 


B. F. Wilcox 


Roy Keikr 


G. M. Watson 


1934 ml. veffion 


G. W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


R. H. Shore 


1935 Grjndmother Gap 


G. W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


W. I.Cook 


1930 Ivll* cpnridni 


G. W. Gragf 


Roy Keller 


Cart Triplett 


1937 Ml. View 


B. F. Wilcox 


G. M. Watson 


Raymond Hendrix 


i93« Watauga 


Carl Triplet! 


F . L. Hampton 


W. 0. Ashley 


1939 Laurel rorK 


Carl Triplet! 


F. L. Hampton 


W. I.Cook 


oaiicv camp 


Cart Triptett 


F. L. Hampton 


G. M. Watson 




Lee J . Church 


N. L. Harrison 


Roy Keller 


174^ new noijcw^ii 


Lee ). Church 


N. L. Harrison 


B. F. Wikox 


QnnA*« Fork 


Lee |. Church 


N. L. Harriiofl 


W. B. Bryant 


1 waiau|a 


N. L< Harrison 


W. M. Brown 


Frank Knight 


174 3 Layiown 


N. L. Harrison 


W.M. Brown 


W. O.Ashley 


1946 Mt. Vernon 


G.M.Watson 


W. M. Brown 


W. 0. Ashley 


1947 YcilooHill 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Waaon 


Roscoc Greene 


1948 No Minutes. Manuscript lost at prictien. Held with Ooc Ridge Church. 




1949 Mt. Paran 


Thco Hendrix 


G. M. Watson 


Roscoe Grc^eEV 


1950 Rock Sprinp 


Theo Hendrix 


N. L. Harrison 


R. L. Barnes 


I9S1 New Hopewell 


Theo Hendrix 


N. L. Harrison 


Barney Oliver 


19S2 Boones Fork 


G. M. Wauon 


|. Merriu Coffey 


W. I.Cook 


I9S3 East Flats 


TtMo Hendrix 


G.M. Wauon 


R. L. Barnes 


1954 Mt. Ephriam 


Theo Hendrix 


G.M.Watson 


Lloyd ). Ouller 


1955 Bailey Camp 


Theo Hendrix 


G. M. Watson 


W. |. Cook 


1956 Laurel Fork 


Theo Hendrix 


). Merrill Coffey 


W. M. Brown 


1957 Mt. Vernon and 








Sandy Flat 


Theo Hendrix 


|. Merriu Coffey * 


W. I.Cook 


1958 Lay town and 








Rock Springs 


Theo Hendrix 


|. Merrin Coffey 


Carson Egfrrs 


1959 New Hopewell and 








Long Ridge 


Carson Eggers 


|. Merrill Cotfey 


W. ). Cook 


1960 Mt. Paran and 








Boones Fork 


Carson Eggers 


|. Merrin Coffey 


Wendell Criicher 


1961 Watauga and 








Yellow Hilt 


Carson Eggers 


{.Merrill Coffey 


Dupree Gowan 


1962 Mt. Ephriam and 








Sandy Flat 


Carson Eggers 


Miss Winifred Hampton 


Roby McNeil 


1963 Doe Ridge and 








Rock Sprinp 


Carson Eggers 


Miss Winifred Hampton 


W. M. Brown 


1964 Bailey 's Camp 


E. O. Bustle 


Mrs. Dark Storie 


Wm, Quinn 


Boones Fork 


E. 0. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 




1965 Laurel Fork 


E. O. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


W. M. Brown 


Lay (own 


E. 0. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 




1966 Longrldge 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. CUrk Storie 


Phillip Martin 


Mt. Paran 


A.C. Moody 


Mrs. Gait Storie 


Lvie (Pete) Vannov 


1967 Mt. Vernon 


Archie Clawkon 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


B4sil Tmcr 


New Hopewell 


Archie CUwson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


£. 0* Bustle 


1968 Rock Sprinp 


A. C. Moody 


Mrs. Ciarii Storie 


A. C. Moody 


Sandy Flat 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Rjyncf Mjiheiofi 


1969 BailcvsCamp 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs. Oart Storie 


Lewis Hodfe 


Boones Fork 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Herf in( Qatp 


1970 Laurel Fork 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Max West 


Oxvid Ausiin 


Doe Ridge 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Max West 


Afchie O^wsofi 


1971 Layiown 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


RiyfTioiid Tufi^nil 


Longridge 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Sherrill Welbom 


1972 Mt. Ephriam 


David Austin 


Mrs. Mu West 


Gurfiev RofeikiHM 

^•me*»T nww**av 


Mount Paran 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


A.C Moody 


1973 Ml. Vernon 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 




New Hopewell 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Sherrill Welbom 


1974 Rock Sprinp 


Marvin Saunders 


Mn. Max West 


Merle fohrtson 


Sandy Flat 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Dale Milstcad 


1975 Yellow Hill 


Merle |ohnson 


Mrs. Max West 


Dean Hodges 


Bailey's Camp 


Merle johnson 


Mrs. Max West 


Max West 


1976 Boones Fork 


Charics Oaig 


Barbara W«u 


A.C Moody 


Doe Ridge 






Uoyd HoBman 


1977 Laurel Fork 


Charles Craig 


. Barbara Weu 


Raymond Hendrix 


Lay town 


Charics Oaig 


Barbara Wcu 


Max West 



44 



1978 


Long Ridge 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Philip Martin 




Mt. Ephraim 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


A.C. Moody 


1979 


Mount Vernon 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Bean 




Boone Fork 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Danner 


1980 


Mt . Paron 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 




New Hopewell 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 


1981 


Rock Spring 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cannon Ward 




Sandy Flat 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jim Lambert 


1982 


Watauga 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Jack White 




Bailey Camp 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cecil Gragg 


1983 


Boone Fork 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


Burl Jones 




Doe Ridge 


Jack White 


Barbara West 


J.R. Robbins 


1984 


Laurel Fork 


Jack White 


Linda 


Mills 


Jack White 




Laytown 


Jack White 


Linda 


Mills 


Ed Greene 


1985 


Long Ridge 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Scott Church 




Mt. Ephraim 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Ed Greene 


1986 


Rock Spring 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Scott Church 




Sandy Flat 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Max West 


1987 


Bailey's Camp 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Greg Mathis 




Boone Fork 


J.R. Robbins 


Linda 


Mills 


Everette Little 


1988 


Doe Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda 


Mills 


Kenneth Ridings 




Laytown 


Scott Church 


Linda 


Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1989 


Long Ridge 


Scott Church 


Linda 


Mills 


Alex Booth 




Mt • Ephraim 


Scott Church 


Linda 


Mills 


Carter Moretz 


1990 


Rock Spring 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Scott Church 




Sandy Flat 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Max West 


1991 


Bailey's Camp 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Jimmy Hubbard 




Boone Fork 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Eugene Fillers 


1992 


Doe Ridge 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Arville Hardy 




Laytown 


George Berry 


Linda 


Mills 


Dennis Geouge 


1993 


Long Ridge 


Max West 


Linda 


Mills 


John McCoury 




Mt. Ephraim 


Max West 


Linda 


Mills 


Sherrill Dunn 


1994 


Rock Spring 


Max West 


Linda 


Mills 


Richard Baird 




Sandy Flat 


Max West 


Linda 


Mills 


Leon Silver 


1995 


Bailey's Camp 


Ron Burgett 


Linda 


Mills 


Max West 




Doe Ridge 


Ron Burgett 


Linda 


Mills 


Arvil Hardy 



The churches/ Buffalo Cove, Cool Springs, Wilkes County Elk, Stony Fork, and Yellow 
Hill, formerly belonging to other associations. 

Met at the Stony Fork Baptist Church and organized the Stony Fork Baptist Association 
on November 9th. and 10th., 1880. For this meeting appointed Elder Larkin Hodges, 
Moderator and Brother Elijah Trivette, Clerk. 



45 



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O 

i 

d 


cr-l 

OI 

s 

- H 

- 1 
» d- 


PASTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


^ i 

J 

—C 

— t 

ul 

rr 


& 
- rs 

I 

0- 

o- 

> 


13- 

rt 

« 


J 

c 


t 

m 

c 

;8 


<! 

LIT 
1 


Kn 
-y 
■S 

<n 

■ 2 

1 



- <rt 


j 

i 

ro 

t 

cO 

■ 

'5 
z 
























1 


(/) 

I 
O 
CC 

X 

o 


=1. 


— 

a; 



-I 

a 
— <: 




_ <J 

-5 


0. 

- 



































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1 ^ 

1 


SaA uoissi/j 










Qj 










1 i 


















a> 


loogos aiQia uoiibob/\ 











ro 






>. 




























CO 


\j;siui^ uBA/sng 35 


















Ql 


























/ 


r>- 


sjaqiiiai^^ 43 iom 35 













































<o 


siinpv a|6ui3 33 












































i 

in 


siuapnis a68||oo 33 










Cj 






























l; 
il 


- 


. ^ 

1 


sjaguia^ 33 iwarg 








ni 




Ci 
































n 

1 


puauv -^liiaaAA 6av 33: 









<^ 


Cj 






H 




























E 


Apni3 aiqig jamo 












Ci 
































I 


sjaoi|40 

















ro 


























^ • 




punoqaujOH 











































< 


'in 
J 


Abmv sjinpv 










Cj 

































c 




uoiiBonp3 |6ioacl3 




Qj 






Cj 



































Is 

1 


dn-S9 s;inpv 














-3 




















- 






i 


1 

s3 


a, 


W-se siinpv 

1 










'r- 






























1 


i 




VZ-SZ siinpv 1 








> 


>>> 




rO 




























w 


1 o 
2; 


^Z-9l siinpv 




Q 













Q 
























j 




■o 

OJ 


Z.l-2imnOA 












































u 

CM 


u-gusjpimo 














Ci 




























Ci 


i3 
CM 


r 










































00 


CM 


1 

llou aipBJO 






Q 







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CM 


lN3miOfclN3 
SS IVlOi 




ct 








> 




ro 


























ri 


TABLE B SUNDAY SCHOOL INFORMATION YEAR ENDING 7- 3/1995 


□ 

•6 

£ 
c 

1 

J 

cj 

a 

"Z 

J ^ 


s 

a 

3 

(A 


5 

1 s 

5 < 

Igc 

8 

1 


£^ 
9- -3 

r< 

sj 

2 ^ 
a 

"1 

5 

CI 

' J 


1 


SUNDAY SCHOOL DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE] 






2 
j 

r" 
2 

1 


r- 



s 

0- 


—c 


V> 
rt 

c 

sn 




-z 
a 

■ ^ 


3 

?! 

-1 


i 

u 
■2 

_S 

— c 


m 

§ 

Q. 
C 


s 

> 

-2 

. ^ 


























W 
_i 

f 




1 

0) 
X 

cc 

I 

u 


, y 



— e 

- 

c 




— z 


<a 

rr 


> 

era; 


■ U- 

•: 
— c 

£ 


1 
























r 



1 IT) 

1 


sanojo uoadng 









G 
































^- 




■T 
Cvi 


SuJuiEJi jaqujs^ waN 














































1 

1 n 


Apnis 9uu;ooa idBg 






•0 
































1 








Add 
21 &22 


NOIiVdIDlidVd 
/1N31«J110HN3 

10 nviOi 




cr- 


- 








































22d 


siinpv LLuex-uoMS 














































' u 

1 OJ 

1 ci 

1 

4 


MinoA ouai-uoMS 














































1 

i S 

1 


U3JP|IL|3 IXlJSi-lJOLIS 










































'■•o 




1 
1 

1 03 
OJ 
1 OJ 

1 


loogosajd ujjai-uOMS 






>^ 








































1 

C\J 
OJ 


ONINIVHi 
dlHS3ndlDSia 
l^d31-ibOHS IVIOI 














































a 






— 


- 


<s 






































■o 


dn S 91 linpv Buiofiuo j 














































1 

u 


ll-Zl Minox 6uio6uo 













































NO 


n 

Cvj 


U-9 Pimo 6u|o6uo 1 








































i 


r— 




(0 


9-g c|3sajd 6uio6uo | 








Ci 


































i 






1 

£)NINIVbl 

diHS3ndiosia 

ONIOONO nViOl 

i 














































TABLE C DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING INFORMATION YEAR ENDING 7 3/i 995 


o 

£ 
c 


s 


2 



5 


a 

c 

ItJ 

■a. 

1^ 


1 

rN 

9- Q 
00 

« 

1 

- 

2 

p 


cn 

UJ 

c/) 

WD 

(T 
Q 
Q 
< 

(/) 

CE UJ 

e§ 

lis 

is 

' Q. 

IS 

1 Q. 

iu 
in 
'a 

I 


Ob 



■0 

=n 

--r 
■2 

CC 


OS - 
•2 

Oh 

t 
2 

<L 
>^ 

c 


r-. 

1 

Q 

CD 
rr> 

- i 


I 
































in 
-J 

■ 
1- 


CO 


t— 

a: 
< 

LLI 
> 

> 
LU 
IT 
CL 


(/) 

, 

I X 
3 
I 
U 


s 

cr 


:i 
— 









































i i 

1 1 w 


saiQLLissug 
leiuaujruisui 












































1 


<o 

CM 


1 

seiqujasug ibooa 






> 








































li ~ 

i! 


siisqpuBH 














































1 1 

L 

IS 

! 


jioyQ iinpv 
J0IU3S aiEjedas 
















































dn S 81. JiOMO iinpv 








> 
































; 






i . 

; cy 
.1 


sjA ii-zi MinOA 








































i 


rc 


! 


■a 
to 
eg 


sjA It -6 u3jp|iM3 








































i 






1 

<o 

OJ 


sjA 8-9 U3JP|CM3 








































1 




i 


i a 

1 

C\J 


1 

SJA g-t» |OOL(0S3Jd I 








































1 






n 
<o 
eg 


i 

1 

sjA c |OOL|3said 

i 














































<o 
eg 


lN3miObN3 

AdXSINII^ 
OlSniAj TVJ.OJ. 




Hi 




> 


































cr 




TABLE D MUSIC MINISTRY INFORMATION YEAR ENDING ? 3 / 1995 


a 

£ 
c 
o 
5 

1^ 


o 

~Z 

c 

2 -= 
9 

C/J 


i UJ 

1 3 


w 

-r ? 

1^ 


MUSIC DIRECTORS & ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


\n 
2 

f= 




— o 

'01 

5^ 

~i 
o 

•y\ 


r- 
^ o 

'rs -J 

.^^ 

it 

ro 

- 
































I 

TOTALS 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


CHURCHES 


r 
<> 




c 


■ 14- 
d 


































[ 



Add 29, 31, 
32, & 33 


BROTHERHOOD 


uoiiedioiuej 

/1U3UJ||0JU9 

pooujamojg iBiOi 












































sdnojg uoipv uoissn/^ 












































CO 
















































sjs6uBLi3 PMO/\A 














































iuamiiojug VbZ3 














































dn S 81. saBv 



























































































s 

CNJ 


U ■ 6 S36v 












































i 

1 ™ 
1 Ol 
1 OJ 


g ■ 9 S96v 












































01 
CO 


iN3m"IObN3 
aOOHb3HiOHa 
IViOi 













































CD 
CNJ 


5 
5 


PBd pelojd suoissi;ftj 






































( 


















On 


































27e 


dn S 9e u3ujo/v\ ideg 


VQ 








> 
































CO 


o 

Si 


t^-ei MAS 












































u 


/ 1.-21. SU88PV 












































CM 


11-9 uoipv ui S|JJ9 








































i 




CO 

r- 

CNJ 


g-g spueuj uoissi^ 












































CNJ 


iN3W"nOHN3 






3 




































to 


i 

z 

Q 
Z 

I 

>• 
2 

g 

i 

cc 
o 
z 

^ 

o 
tr. 
m 
a 

5 

z 
Q 
z 

3 


Q 
■0 

J 

o 


"3 

a 

a) 


4- 

I 

J 

y 
2 

'o 
a !2 

1^ 

6 ' 
u " 
3 

i ^ 

? - 

■|.u 


1 

rt) 

3 1 

^ 1 
.1 ' 

s 
1 

\l 


1 
1 

si 

°l 

8- 

N.Ul 

3l§ 

i2 " 

Sis 

cell 
jt3lx 

111 

! 1 
1 


1 
1 

f 


1 
1 

'I 


1 
1 
1 

1 

Ji 

op 


1 
1 
1 

1 

do 

h 


1 

J" 

J 

-| 'IS 

ri 


1 
1 
1 

''I 

— ' 1 

■ -1 Q 
la 

■^^ 


1 
1 




1 




















1 
1 

1 

1 

1 


1 
1 

' </, 

' o 

i 


CO 
O 

< 

>- 

CO 
D 

o 

> 

LU 

cc 


o 

I 
(J 


<x 
-> 

J. 




— o 

o 


•a 

Q 
'1. 




- 







































o 












§ 


































i 


o 






Q 










































Q 


0) 
CO 


AjjadoJd MOJOLO-aniBA ' 




Q 
O 




Q 





Q- 

'O 




Q 





































a 
n 


sasuadx3 leooi 
JSMIO IIV 






0^ 




V- 


> 


-3 
































T3 

1^ 


ajniEjaiii uojnijQ 




-> 
ro 




> 


(>- 

"O 

<) 


v> 


<o 
\ 


























! 


> 

> 




u 
cn 


luaiiiajiiau ;qaa 














1 


Q 


























>- 




\. 

1 


uouoansuoQ MBN 




O 












■0 


























;i 




cr 


1 ™ 

1 n 

1 
1 


saueiBS (jeis yajntio 








V) 


>- 


■0 


Q 


V) 

/ 
























i 




Cl 

!^ 


r- 
n 


S3bniiaN3dX3 , 

ivoon "iviOi 






> 


r- 
r< 


t^ 






Q 
■> 


























■> 




u 
<o 
cn 


sidiaoatd jamo 




O 


o 




































1 




1 a 


syio pa;Eu6isaa 






o 


0- 

os 




\r> 

■0 
cn 


ns 
1^ 

v3 




























1 -3 

to 




a 


SU!0 paieu6isapun 




<N 
>- 

<^ 


o 




:r 




1^ 


V> 




























tr 
no 




sidi303u moi 




to 


o- 


:3- 




V, 
































0- 

(T- 
— 3 


Q 
rO' 

a 


TABLE F FINANCIAL INFORMATION YEAR ENDING 7 J"/ 1 995 


a 

•9 

J 

Si 


2 

"a 

3 — 


c 


T 

I- a 
1 


\^ 

a. -3 
« 

J- 

— a' 
jy 

i cr 


TREASURERS » ADDRESSES (INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


£ 

cr 

— o 


8 

c 

> 

.J 




2 

V 

ro 

■ ^ 

1 

- J 

• ^ 


<i 
1 

n 

>: 
2 

J 
<=££ 

i_ 


1 a 

c 

CI' 


■J 



1 



■ ^ 


i 

c 

f 


r- 
? 

J 


t 
























CO 
_J 

? 



1- 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


to 

UJ 
X 

o 
oc 

X 

o 




T 
— 

Is 


-1 

a 


V 

■5 




i 


■ vT 































saiii|pe:j lu8Luaji)3):l 



Do 

-3 



x3 



sieiidsoH 



S3UJ0H s.uajpimo 



siooyog 



suoissi^ amOH jaMlO 



SuoJiSLUJv aiuuy 



suoissi^ aiBis 



SUOISSI^V 30SSV 



Do 



JaL|lO-^JOlsSl^^^ 



jsuoo MaM-uoissi^^ 



S3dniiaN3dX3 

NOissii^ nviOi 



o 



s3 



d 



1 ^ 



1 — • 

cr 



1 

o 

r- 
2 

J. 



or 



o 



to 



x5 



7 a::^ 



1- 



J 



ID 


6ui)eA0U3y/6uip|ing 




~^ 








































I 


<o 


ia6png u( jadBj aieis 












































i 

/ 


S 


laBpng 






>- 


> 


>- 




>- 


























!| 






o> 
m 


1 

S)uauj)iujujo3 6uim!x j 






>- 


































■i 

1 






CD 


IEAIA3H 3dOH s.ajaiH ! 




>- 










































m 


sauisiui^ AjiunLULuoo 












>- 


































lO 

m 


j^pn;g uoissnnj u6i3joj 
















































ufiiajoj-jaAejd |0 >tAA 














> 


































Apnis uoissijAi aujoH 














































i 

1 

1 in 

i 


aojOH-JsAeJd (0 >(a3AA 














>- 


























i 




! S 


dnojo iinpv aiBuig 












































i 

4 


iuaujM3iju3 36eijje^ 














































o 

in 


ipunoo LjojngQ ' 






$ 








































t 


UOIJBIISIA 













>- 


>- 
































03 


A/as |Buoiie6aj6uoQ 










> 


>- 


































T 


Ideg luapms a6ai|oo 








o 








o 


























O 




(O 

•» 


UV Ajag d|L|SjOM i^d 

1 




O 


o 


o 






O 
































in 


UV AJag dmsJOAA t^lV 




CS 


o 


«-< 


\n 






> 






























5 


[V-l) S|0OL|0S UBIISUIIO 














































m 








^ 




_ 






































eg 


(S-l) ujojd ta6png 










Vf) 






— 






























TABLE H SPECIAL INFORMATION 


1^ 


o 

o 

o 

s 2 
a 

tn 


YEAR ENDING 7 -3/ 1995 

(Monlh & Day) 


CHURCHES 


< 

_ 1 




- 2 

— 


3 

e 

2 
— X 


- i 

- il: 


2 


6 

— i 

I 


























TOTALS 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 



1 ^ 

i 


iqaa yojnyo 
















c 






























Q 

\ 




r) 


yojnLio (0 anjBA 






Q 

w 




O 



Ci 

'^i 
(> 


o 


Q 
o 


1 




























o 
o 

o 


1 

i S 

1 


suoissiinj ieuoiiei30ssv 









































1 

1 






1 

1 ; 

ii " 

ii 

1 1 


uiBjBojd aAUBjadooo 




>^ 










> 


























I 




> 


1 1 
1 

I 
1 


sajniipuadxg 
uoissiiM leioi 




Q 










> 


-^^ 


























o 
Vi 




' s 

■ cn 

1 


sidiaoau leiox 




^> 

cr- 


-3 




r-- 

o 


o 




V. 


























cr 
oT 


o 


Add 29, 31,' 
32, & 33 


uouBaiaipBd/iuaaiijOjug 
poonjamojg iBiOi 








































1 




T 




luauj||0JU3 n^MM leioi 












o 




" — 
























1 
I 






1 lO 

1 ^ 
J 


;uaLU||0ju3 
Aj(Siuiy^ 3isn^ IBioj. 




o 






































cr 




1 ^ 
l< * 

CM 


UOIJBdiOllJEd 

/juaui||0JU3 SuiuiBJj. 
diLisaidiosiQ jBioi 




0- 




— 








O 
























i 


o 




OI 


luaLui|0Ju3 
joOLios 3IPia uoueoEA 

















cr 
























t 

1 


o 

OS 




c^ 


luauj||0JU3 
jooujos ABpuns leioj. 






Ui 




>• 


Q 


XT 


ro 
























i 


o° 




0) 


diMSjaqiua^ leioi 












O 


0^ 




























in 
f- 






SU0I1IPP8 jagto 






Qi 


































f 


! 3 


\ — 


(O 


siusudeg leioi 




o 








— 




























r 






Ajunoo 




1 

— o 




■ 3 

— 






'I 


J 

Q 


























i 
1 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


DIGEST OF LETTERS 

IMPORTANT This table is lor use by the clerV in any 
vay helpful It is not lo be sent to the stale conuenlion 
office or Southern Baptist Conuention oHice 




NAME OF CHURCH 


i 

_ ^ 

^ y 


<j. 




— e 
- ^ 

— C 


- \^ 


c 

C 




























1 

< 

1- 
O 
1- 



1 

/ 



I 




_1 



i 



ay 

ML 
Si/ 




I 



STONY FORK 
MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 
1996 ANNUAL 



1996 MINUTES OF THE 
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL 
MEETING 
OF 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 
LAYTOWN, AUGUST 9, 1996 
AND 

LONG RIDGE, AUGUST 10, 1996 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Associational Leaders 1 

Suggested Order of Business 3 

Constutition and Bylaws 4 

Financial Report 14 

Home Missions 15 

Women on Mission 16 

Foreign Missions 17 

Retirement Homes 19 

Children's Homes 22 

Baptist Hospital 23 

Christian Higher Education 24 

Baptist Foundation 26 

Biblical Recorder 27 

Discipleship Training 28 

N.C. State Missions 29 

Stewardship 31 

Resolutions 32 

Budget 33 

Proceedings. 34 

History/Historical Table 41 

Tables 
Map 



;OUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 
ASSOCIATION AL LEADERS - 1996 



ma 



Association 

Stony Fork 



aase provide the upcoming name (new church year), mailing address, and telephone number of the tollowing positions 
ange the title to contorm to the name of the position used by your association. 



in your association. It the position(s) listed is not the exact title used by your association. 



•D > 
Ui « 

o a 



c 

si 



- £ 

(0 o 
M U 



H. PHONE 



H. PHONE 



rMILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST. ZIP CODE 



H PHONE 



WK PHONE 



I FULL-TIME 



^3part-tiivie 



tMAI^E 



MAILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST, ZIP CODE 



WK. PHONE 



FULL-TIME 



I PART-TIME 



NAME 



MAILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST ZIP CODE 



WK PHONE 



I FULL-TIME 



PART-TIME 



NAME 



ct 

LU 
O 

Ul 
LL 
O 



< 

UJ 

z 

Hi 

o 



NAME 



Roy Kanupp 



MAILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST ZIP CODE 



PHONE 



NAME 



Rt. 5. Box 302 



Leno jr. N.C. 28645 



704-754-5218 



Arvil Hardy 



MAILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST. ZIP CODE 



PHONE 



NAME 



Howards Creek Rd. 



Boone, N.C, 



28606 



704-297-2107 



Linda H. Mills 



KMILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST ZIP CODE 



PHONE 



NAME 



159 Hollifi e ld 



Rd. 



Blowing Rock, Nc. 28605 



704-295-7095 



Ek3ith Gryder 



MAILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST ZIP CODE 



PHONE 



972 Edmisten Rd., 



Blowing Rock, NC. 28605 



704-295-3410 



MAILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST ZIP CODE 



NAME 



MAILING ADDRESS 



H PHONE 



WK PHONE 



I FULL-TIME 



I PART-TIME 



NAME 



S 12. 



MAILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST ZIP CODE 



H PHONE 



WK PHONE 



C3 FULL-TIME 



IPART-TIME 



NAME 



MAILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST ZIP CODE 



H PHONE 



WK PHONE 



C3 FULL-TIME 



PART-TIME 



NAME 



n 

1 ° 



T.inda Mi Ha 



MAILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST ZIP CODE 



159 Hollifield Rd. 



Blowing Rock, NC 28605 



Z 

g 

< 
N 

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UJ 

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QC 

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LU 
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(/) 



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(S 
Q. 



CITY, ST ZIP CODE 



PHONE 



NAME 



o 
o 

u o 

>. 0) 

?° 
3 
(0 



Ted Triplett 



MAILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST ZIP CODE 



PHONE 



o 

.5- o 

£ « 

V) -h 
t) o 
q. o: 
o 

.<!> c 
Q » 



NAME 



252 Triplett Rd, 



Ferguson, NC 28624 



910-973-7885 



Charles Craig 



MAILING ADDRESS 



CITY, ST ZIP CODE 



PHONE 



Rt. 3, Box 730 



Boone, N.C. 



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2 



SUGGESTED ORDER OF BUSINESS FOR 1997 
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY SIXTH 
ANNUAL MEETING OF STONY FORK 
MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 8, 1997 
MOUNT EPHRAIM 

8:30 Call to order 

8:35 Song 

8:40 Devotion 

8:50 Adoption of Program 

9:00 Roll Call 

9:05 Recognition of New Pastors and Workers 

9:10 Vacation Bible School 

9:15 Foreign Missions 

9:25 Sunday School 

9:30 Cooperative Program 

9:40 Evangelism 

9:50 Finance Report - Budget 

10:00 Break 

10:10 Home Missions 

10:25 State Missions 

10:40 Children's Homes 

10:55 Retirement Homes 

11:10 Baptist Hospital 

11:25 Christian Higher Education 

11:40 Baptist Foundation 

11:55 Stewardship 

12:10 Annual Message 

1:00 Adjourn - Lunch 

SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 9, 1997 
ROCK SPRING 

8:30 Call to Order 

8:35 Song 

8:40 Devotion 

8:50 Roll Call of Churches 

8:55 Biblical Recorder 

9:05 Discipleship Training 

9:15 Women on Mission 

9:25 Temperance and Morals - Christian Action League 

9:50 General Board Report 

9:55 Stewardship Report 

10:00 Break 

10:10 Resolutions 

10:15 Obituaries 

10:20 Business Meeting - Election of Officers - Approve Budget 

11:00 Annual Message 

12:00 Adjourn - Lunch 



3 



CONSTITUTION 



OF THE STONY FORK MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PREAMBLE 

For the declaration of its fundamental purposes and the 
permanent guidance and control of its activities, the body does 
adopt the following as its constitution, to wit: 

ARTICLE I — Name and Membership 

SECTION 1. This body shall be known as the Stony Fork 
Missionary Baptist Association of North Carolina. 

SECTION 2 . The association is composed of Missionary Baptist 
Churches. 

SECTION 3. Any Baptist church may be admitted into this 
Association upon recommendation of the Committee of Petitionary 
Letters and Constitution of the Churches Committee and the majority 
vote of members present at any meeting as prescribed in Article IX. 

SECTION 4. Any church, at her discretion, may withdraw from 
this body. 

SECTION 5. This association may, at any meeting, after an 
investigation and report of a duly authorized committee of the 
Association, by a majority vote, declare a dissolution of union 
with any church deemed corrupt, either in doctrine or practice. 

SECTION 6. Each church shall elect its messengers to the 
annual associational meeting. Each messenger must be certified in 
the annual church letter to the Association and must be appointed 
on the following ration: five messengers, in addition to the 
pastor, for each church having a membership not exceeding fifty, 
and one additional messenger for each increase of fifty. In no 
case shall the total number of messengers exceed ten for any given 
church, in addition to the pastor. 

SECTION 7. When any church shall fail to be represented by 
letter or messenger for two consecutive years, the Missions 
Committee shall confer with the church, and if satisfactory reason 
is not given, and there is no evidence that said church wishes to 
keep alive their affiliation with the Association, the committee 
shall bring its findings to the next Executive Committee meeting, 
and the Association shall, at that time, by a majority of present 
members, vote to withdraw fellowship. The Association recognizes 
the right of any affiliated church to withdraw its fellowship from 
the Association. 

SECTION 8. The Annual Associational meeting shall convene on 
Friday at 8:30 a.m. and adjourn at 1:00 p.m. (lunch to follow). It 
shall reconvene at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday and adjourn at the 
completion of business for the noon meal. This following the first 
Sunday in August. 

ARTICLE II - Purpose 

SECTION 1. The prime purpose of the Association shall be to 
counsel together for the enlargement and strengthening of God's 



4 



kingdom and to promote unity and growth among the churches 
composing it. 

SECTION 2. It shall be the purpose of this Association to 
enlist all of the churches into full cooperation with the North 
Carolina Baptist State Convention and the Southern Baptist 
Convention and their agencies in the work of missions, evangelism, 
christian education and social service. 

ARTICLE III - Powers and Prerogatives 

SECTION 1. The Association, when convened in meeting, shall 
sit as an advisory council and shall have no power to infringe on 
any of the internal rights and affairs of the member churches. It 
may advise, however, with the member churches and recommend 
measures of usefulness for their adoption or rejection. 

SECTION 2 . When grievances occur between any members or 
minority group of any church which is a member of the Association, 
The Association, the Executive Committee, or Missions Committee, or 
the committee designated by and acting for either of these bodies, 
may advise or give aid in matters which do not infringe on the 
rights of the local church, an this only on the invitation of the 
individual or group involved. 

SECTION 3 . Any church found unfaithful to the faith and 
practices common to the Association, as outlined in Addendum I - 
ARTICLES OF FAITH (the Baptist Faith and Message as adopted by the 
Southern Baptist Convention in 1963) shall be encouraged to correct 
such errors. If the conduct of said church is not corrected and is 
of such nature as to alienate said church from the orderly and 
faithful churches of the association, the Executive Committee of 
the Association can recommend that fellowship be withdrawn from 
said church, and upon a majority vote of the messengers in the 
annual session, fellowship of said church can be withdrawn. (See 
Article 1, Section 7). 

ARTICLE IV - The Executive Committee 

SECTION 1. The Association shall have an Executive Committee 
to serve as the Association between annual meetings, assisting in 
the overall work of the Association with such limitations as may be 
imposed by the constitution. 

SECTION 2. The Executive Committee shall be composed of the 
associational officers and the pastors, and the chairman of 
deacons, along with two elected lay persons from each church. 
Sixteen members shall constitute a quorum. The names of these 
persons shall be furnished annually to the associational clerk, if 
changes occur during the associational year, these changes shall be 
forwarded to the clerk. 

SECTION 3. At the beginning of each Executive Committee 
meeting, a roll call will be taken of each church and its 
representatives . 

SECTION 4. The Executive Committee shall meet within two 
weeks after the Annual Association Meeting, the second Sunday of 
November, March, and July. These meetings shall be held in 
churches of the Association, consecutively in alphabetical order. 



5 



ARTICLE V - Officers 



SECTION 1. The officers of this body shall be: Moderator, 
Vice-Moderator, Clerk, Treasurer, Sunday School Director, Church 
Training Director, Brotherhood Director, V7MU Director, Vacation 
Bible School Director, Music Director, Pianist, and Evangelism 
Director. 

SECTION 2. The officers of the Association shall be elected 
at each regular Annual Associational Meeting. The Nominating 
Committee shall fill vacancies that may occur in the respective 
categories between annual meetings of the Association by bringing 
names to the Executive Committee for their approval 

SECTION 3. By the virtue of the office, the Associational 
Director of Missions is considered an ex-officio member of all 
associational committees. For all qualifications and terms of 
office, see Article VII, Section 1. 

ARTICLE VI - Duties of Officers 

SECTION 1. It shall be the duty of the Moderator of the 
Association to preside over the annual sessions, and at the 
quarterly meetings of the Executive Committee. As the presiding 
officer, he shall open the meetings punctually at the appointed 
time, enforce the rules, preserve order, and exercise all the 
prerogatives f a presiding officer, according to the principles of 
established parliamentary usage. He shall provide leadership for 
a progressive ideal throughout the Association. He shall be 
elected for a one year term, and he shall not succeed himself for 
a maximum of two full terms. He shall appoint in advance any other 
committees he may deem necessary or advisable. Each of these 
committees shall report at the annual meeting for which they are 
appointed. It shall be the responsibility of the Moderator to call 
any needed meetings at any time he deems necessary. The moderator 
is considered an ex-officio member of all committees. 

SECTION 2. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to 
discharge the duties of the Moderator in his absence or at his 
request . 

SECTION 3. It shall be the duty of the clerk to keep an 
accurate record of the proceedings of the Association in regular 
and special sessions; to keep accurate records of quarterly 
meetings of the Executive Committee; to keep on file the printed 
minutes and other important documents belonging to the Association; 
to furnish the churches with blank letter forms on which to make 
the annual reports to the Association; to superintend the printing 
of the minutes, and to distribute them to the churches as soon 
after adjournment as possible. For this service, the clerk shall 
be paid annually an amount recommended by the Finance Committee and 
approved by the Association. 

SECTION 4. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive 
all funds of the Association and to disburse the same in accordance 
with the budget of the Association or for the purposes for which 
the funds were contributed, to render to the Association an 
itemized report of the receipts and disbursements at the first 
session of the annual meeting. In the treasurer's absence, a 



6 



member of the Finance Committee shall give the report. The 
treasurer shall make available through the associational newsletter 
a quarterly report including the contributions of each church in 
the Association. A quarterly report shall be made available at the 
quarterly meetings of the Executive Committee. For this service, 
the treasurer shall be paid annually an amount recommended by the 
Finance Committee and approved by the Association. 

SECTION 5. The Sunday School Director shall take the 
initiative in promoting inspirational meetings, study courses, and 
leadership classes for the churches of the Association. He shall 
work in cooperation with the denominational Sunday School agencies 
in promoting the denominational programs; and he will be 
responsible for coordinating and promoting Vacation Bible School 
work in conjunction with the Vacation Bible School Director. He 
shall also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting 
leadership for his organization. 

SECTION 6. The Discipleship Training Director shall take the 
initiative in promoting the regular meetings projected by the State 
Convention and be available to the churches for help in 
strengthening the established unions and encourage the organization 
of new unions in churches without them. He shall also work with 
the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his 
organization . 

SECTION 7. The Brotherhood Director shall be responsible for 
promoting missionary education within the Association and be 
available to the churches to assist in strengthening organizations 
and programs of existing units. He shall also work with the 
Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

SECTION 8. The WMU Director shall be responsible for 
promoting missionary education within the Association and shall be 
available to the churches to assist in promoting and establishing 
new Baptist Women and Baptist Women auxiliary units, and shall 
assist in strengthening the organizations and programs of existing 
units. She shall also work with the Nominating Committee in 
enlisting leadership for her organization. 

SECTION 9. The Vacation Bible School Director shall work in 
conjunction with the Sunday School Director in enlisting and 
training workers, planning and organizing for the annual Vacation 
Bible School Clinic. 

SECTION 10. The Music Director shall take the initiative in 
promoting the meetings and activities suggested by the State Music 
Leadership and be available to the churches to help in 
strengthening their music programs. The Music Director will be 
responsible for the music at the associational and Executive 
Committee meetings. He shall also work with the Nominating 
Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

SECTION 11. The Pianist will be responsible for playing the 
piano at all associational and Executive Committee meetings. 

SECTION 12. The Evangelism Chairman will work with the 
Evangelism program in planning, promoting, and coordinating all 
evangelistic activities for the Association in conjunction with the 
Director of Missions. 



7 



ARTICLE VIII - Director of Missions 



Statement of Purpose and Position Title: 

The office or position will be known as the Director of 
Missions for the Stony Fork Missionary Baptist Association. The 
Director of Minions shall provide responsible leadership in the 
work of the Association through performing such basic functions as 
the planning, correlation, and implementation of programs, program 
services, and ministries of the Association; counsel the churches; 
agencies of needs, problems, and potentialities, with the 
Association; and interpret to the churches the program resources and 
other assistance available for the Baptist State Convention and 
Southern Baptist Convention agencies. 

SECTION 1. RESPONSIBILITIES 

A. Planning and coordination 

1. Lead the Association in strategy planning; 
establishing and maintaining a long-range program. Lead the 
Association to set goals and encourage the churches to work toward 
them. 

2 . Coordinate the associational work and meetings by 
serving as ex-officio member of all committees. 

3 . Work with program officers and the Nominating 
Committee in selecting and enlisting leaders for organizations and 
committees of the Association. 

4. Counsel, encourage, and lead in training the 
associational officers. 

B . Education and Promotion 

1 . Seek to assist the pastors and the churches in 
programs suitable for their growth and development, recognizing the 
differences in size and diversity of membership, utilizing 
persuasion to promote fellowship and cooperation. 

2. Seek out in cooperation with the Missions Committee, 
places of mission needs and seek to enlist and appropriate churches 
t meet these needs. In the event no church(es) can been listed, 
upon the instructions of the Missions Committee, the Director of 
Missions may lead in such a program in the name of Stony Fork 
Baptist Association. 

3. Promote church organizational programs: Sunday 
School, Discipleship Training, Church Music, Brotherhood, WMU, and 
Vacation Bible School and Leadership Training. 

4. Promote church assistance programs: Evangelism, 
Stewardship and Family Life. 

5. Plan for and promote simultaneous efforts, such as: 
World Missions Conference, revival crusades, enlargement campaigns, 
training school, etc. 

6 . Prepare in cooperation with the Missions Committee an 
annual associational calendar. Prepare a monthly associational 
newsletter for distribution in the Association. 

7 . Attend denominations meetings and conferences as 
budget and time considerations permit. 

8 . Report to the Executive Board at its regular meetings 
and to the Association in annual session. 



8 



C. Service Ministry 

1. Provide counsel and help as requested by pastors and 

churches. 

2. Serve as pulpit supply, assist in church surveys, and 
conduct studies and revivals as requested in keeping with terms of 
employment. Pulpit supply for a period of 4 weeks. 

3. Manage the associational office, supervise 
associational employees, and maintain equipment of the Association. 

4. Cooperate with the Finance Committee in planning the 
budget and promoting giving to the Association. 

5. Establish and announce office hours to best utilize 
the division of time between the associational office and field 
responsibilities . 

6. Always working through the pastors, the Director of 
Missions will be available to offer aid to churches in need of 
assistance. No program will be conducted for a church without the 
invitation of the pastor and/or church. In the event the church is 
without a pastor, the Director of Missions will respond to request 
from the church leadership. 

SECTION 2 . Terms of Employment 

A. Term of Office - the Director of Missions shall be 
called for an indefinite term of service. 

B. Remuneration - will be recommended by the Missions 
and Finance Committees and approved by the Association. 

C. Honorariums - will be received for pulpit supply, 
weddings, funerals, revivals, and pastoral service, not directly 
related to his normal responsibilities; shall be considered 
personal remuneration. 

D. Work Schedule - schedules will vary, with weekends 
normally being kept for services in churches in the Association. 

E. Work Accountability - The Missions Committee pledges 
itself to a ministry of loyalty, support, and loving encouragement 
to the Director of Missions, so that under the leadership of the 
Spirit of God, he may render the most effective service possible. 

F. Both parties must give a thirty day notice before 
termination. 

SECTION 3. Qualifications 

A. Spiritual - a committed Christian with an sense of 
definite call to mission service. 

B. Educational - Preferably college and seminary 
degrees, or their equivalent. 

C. Special Knowledge and Skills - Knowledge of Baptist 
denominational life and willingness to continue to learn; vision, 
flexibility, and demonstrated leadership, ability in planning, 
conducting, and evaluating the work of- the Association. 

D. Character - Christian integrity. 

E. Experience - Pastoral ministry. Christian education 
or associational and other mission experience are necessary. 
Preferably the associational experience should be as a Director of 
Missions, associational staff member, or as an active and 
responsible officer in the Association. The mission experience may 
be in the establishment of and involvement in mission outreach and 
ministry in a mission, church or association. 



9 



ARTICLE III - Committees and Their Duties • 

SECTION 1. The committee of Time, Place and Preacher shall be 
composed of three members. It shall be the duty of the committee 
to recommend to the Association, the churches where the next 
session will be held, preferably to be taken in alphabetical order, 
and also the preacher for the annual session. In order to 
alleviate any hardship on any one church hosting the associational 
meeting, it is suggested that two churches may jointly host each 
meeting. Expenses, meeting places, and other arrangements will be 
coordinated by the churches selected. 

SECTION 2. The Committee on Resolutions shall be composed of 
two members. It shall be the duty of this committee to draw and 
present to the Association suitable resolutions of appreciation and 
expressions of sentiments on any matter chosen by the committee or 
as directed by the messengers of the Association. 

SECTION 3. The Program Committee shall be composed of the 
general officers of the Association. It shall be the duty of this 
committee to prepare and present a suggested order of business to 
be adopted by the Association. When adopted, the program becomes 
the order of business unless changed by common consent or by the 
vote of the body. 

SECTION 4. The Committee of Nominations shall be composed of 
five members (pastors of each church). It shall be the duty of the 
committee to prepare for the Association the names of individuals 
as nominees for the following officers and reports: Moderator, 
Vice-Moderator, Treasurer, Clerk, Sunday School Director, 
Discipleship Training Director, Music Director, Vacation Bible 
School Director, Brotherhood Director, Pianist, Evangelism 
Director, and Associational State Representatives, also persons for 
the following reports shall also be selected: Home Missions, State 
Missions, Foreign Missions, Stewardship, Cooperative Program, 
Obituaries, Temperance and Morals, VBS, WMU, Sunday School, and any 
others designated by the Association. Representatives for the 
following shall be selected: N.C. Baptist Hospital, N.C. 
Children's Homes, Baptist Home for the Aging, Denominational 
Colleges (Christian Higher Education), Denominational Literature, 
Annuity Board, Baptist Foundation, and any others designated by the 
Association. The Committee on Nominations shall be responsible for 
selecting and contacting each of these persons for their approval 
before the annual meeting. The floor shall be open for nominations 
for these officers on the day of the annual meeting. Nominations 
from the floor shall be taken first, then the Chairperson of the 
Nominating Committee shall give the nomination of the committee. 
All nominees bust be contacted before and permission given for 
acceptance of nomination. The WMU will elect their officers. 

SECTION 5. The Finance Committee shall be composed of five 
members, one of which will include the Treasurer of the 
Association. It shall be the duty of this committee to prepare and 
recommend a budget for the Association and to suggest ways and 
means whereby the budget can be raised by the local churches and to 
secure the cooperation of the churches in raising the budget. The 
Finance Committee will present the proposed budget on the first day 
of the annual meeting with discussion and adoption scheduled for 



10 



the second day. The Finance Committee shall meet prior to the 
quarterly Executive Committee meeting and shall prepare a regular 
form acceptable to the Association, a detailed financial report 
which shall be given to each member present at the quarterly 
meeting and the annual meeting. 

SECTION 6. The Missions Committee shall be composed of fiver 
members (pastors of each church) and this committee shall report to 
and cooperate with the Executive Committee of the Association. The 
duties of this committee are: (a) coordinate and help promote 
through the organizations and committees all phases and activities 
of the associational programs, (b) cooperate with the local 
churches in making surveys of areas which, in the opinion of the 
Missions Committee, are not being adequately served by the local 
missionary Baptist work, and to promote and develop these new 
phases of the missions programs, (c) serve in advisory capacity to 
the Director of Missions in all matters pertaining to his work and 
to serve with him in directing and promoting the missions programs 
of the Association, (d) provide information and assistance to the 
departments of State Missions of the N.C. Baptist Convention in 
meeting local missionary needs, such as missionary pastor's 
assistance, promoting mission causes, etc., (e) meet prior to the 
Executive Committee or at any time necessary to discharge its 
duties, (f) shall have the following responsibilities relating to 
the office of Director of Missions: 

1. Serve as a search committee for a Director of Missions. 

2. Recommend to the Executive Committee the name of the 
nominee . 

3. Coordinate financial matters with the Baptist State 
Convention. 

4. Serve as a liaison between the churches and the Director 
of Missions. 

SECTION 7. The Constitution and By-Laws Committee shall be 
composed of the Missions Committee and one selected layperson of 
the Association, making six members. It shall be the duty of 
this committee to review and update the constitution and by-laws as 
it becomes necessary. This committee will recommend revisions and 
amendments concerning the constitution and by-laws to the 
Association as deemed necessary. They shall meet at least once a 
year before the annual meeting to review and discuss the 
constitution . 

SECTION 8. The Committee of Petitionary Letters and 
Constitutions of churches: 

ARTICLE IX - Petitionary letters and constitution of churches 

The Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the 
Churches shall be made up of the Missions Committee members. 

SECTION 1. Any group of baptized believers in Christ desiring 
to organize themselves into a missionary Baptist church with the 
purpose of seeking the recognition of, and fellowship and cooperate 
with this Association, shall be required to fulfill the following 
requirements. They shall submit their request for admission to the 
Director of Missions or the Moderator, who will in turn forward it 
to the Committee of Petitionary Letters. In addition to the letter 



11 



of request, a church must also furnish a report of work 
accomplished since its organization, a copy of the church covenant, 
and its articles of faith. 

SECTION 2. Any church seeking admission into the fellowship 
of the Association must be under the watchcare of the Association 
for a period of one year before it can be admitted. During this 
interim period, the church shall be expected to have part in the 
support of the causes fostered by the Association, the N.C. State 
Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention. 

SECTION 3 . The findings f the Committee on Petitionary 
Letters shall be reported at the annual meeting or at the Executive 
Committee meeting with a recommendation either for or against 
admission. 

SECTION 4. If the church is accepted under the watchcare of 
the Association, the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall 
recommend at the end of the year that the church be accepted into 
full fellowship provided that examination of that years work done 
and a study of the cooperative spirit of that church proves to be 
in accordance to the principles of the churches of the Association. 
A two-thirds majority vote of the messengers or Executive Committee 
members present shall be needed for such an action to be completed. 
There will be an appropriate program conducted during the annual 
meeting to formally welcome this new church into the Association. 

SECTION 5. For a sister cooperative Missionary Baptist church 
that is affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention, that 
wishes to join or transfer status, the same procedure is needful 
with the exception of the one year associational watchcare. Upon 
receipt of letter of request, the Committee of Petitions shall 
recommend its findings to the Executive Committee, and after a 
thirty day period of investigation, the discretion of the Executive 
Committee shall be used if immediate acceptance of fellowship is 
possible. If accepted, a program of welcoming shall be presented 
at the annual meeting. 

ARTICLE X — Amendments 

The constitution or any part of the constitution shall be 
amended at the annual meeting in August, with the acceptance by 
two-thirds majority vote. It is suggested that all changes and 
recommendations of amendments be submitted two months prior to the 
annual meeting, to the Constitution and By-Laws Committee for their 
careful consideration; however, any messenger has a right to submit 
proposed changes in accordance with this article 

BY-LAWS 

1. All associational meetings shall be opened and closed in 
prayer. 

2. "Roberts Rules of Order" shall be used as guidelines for 
parliamentary procedure in all meetings. The Moderator will be 
responsible for having a copy of same at all meetings and a copy of 
parliamentary procedures and the gavel of the Association shall be 
transferred upon succession of the moderator. 

3. All associational officers shall exercise authority over 



12 



their department and shall give a financial accounting to the 
Finance Committee for monies expended. 

4. Election and installation of officers shall take place on 
the last day of the annual meeting in August, and these officers 
shall be responsible for planning, coordinating, and providing 
leadership for the coming year in the Association. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

Time, Place and Preacher Committee will be amended to the 
hosting church pastor or a preacher of his choice will be the 
preacher for the associational meetings. Committee membership will 
be filled according to the number of people participating in the 
associational work. 

Article VIII - Committees and their duties. Section 4 - 
amended to: recommendations from the Nominating Committee shall be 
presented first, then nominations will be taken from the floor. 



13 



REPORTS 



Financial Report 
for 

STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Annual Meeting 
August 9,1996 

Balance August 1, 1995 



$5600.64 



Contributions from churches for year: 



--Bailey's Caimp 
--Doe Ridge 
--Lay town 
— Long Ridge 
--Mt. Ephricun 
— Rock Spring 
— Sandy Flat 
Other: 

--Sue Fitzgerald 



$ 400.00 

336.00 

399 

350 

575 
1588 
1610 



($ 50 min) 



00 
00 
00 
22 
22 



( 84 

( 25 

( 25 

( 100 



) 



25.00 



--Offerings and donations for 159.80 
missions 

— George Berry 150.00 
--Donation for mission trip 745.78 

and reimbursement for work 

on van * 



Total Contributions 



-1-6339.02 
$11939. 66 



Expenditures : 

--George Berry (Travel) 

— Annuity (G. Berry) 

— Linda Mills (Clerk Honorarium) 

--Edith Gryder ( Treas . Honorarium 

--Precision Printing (Minutes) 

--Convention Expense (G. Berry 

and Charles Craig) 
— Discipleship Training conf . 
--WMU expense 
--Postage & deposit stamp 
--Nadine Holt (hosp.exp.) 
--Larry Woodie (hosp.exp>) 

New Jersey mission 
--Repair on van * 
--West Va. mission 



$3000.00 
900.00 
250.00 
250.00 
379. 26 
150.00 

45.00 
150.00 

13.23 
500.00 
500.00 
495.84 
580. 78 
582. 22 



Total Expenditures 
Total in Treasure 8/1/96: 



-7796. S."-! 
$4143. 33 



14 



HttB 



Home Mission Board, sbc 

Ckrisi for Our Nation 

1995 ANNUAL REPORT SUMMARY/fflGHLIGHTS 

The Home Mission Board (HMB) is a missionary-sending agency of the Southern Baptist Convention 
(SBC). With national offices in the Atlanta, Georgia area, the HMB's purpose is to serve Southern Baptists by 
assisting churches to proclaim the gospel of Jesus Christ, start and grow New Testament congregations, and minister 
to people in the name of Christ. 

As of December 31, 1995, there were 4,857 missions personnel serving in the United States, the Caribbean, 
Guam, American Samoa, and Canada. The HMB also has endorsed more than 2,400 chaplains who are serving in 
healthcare agencies, institutions, businesses, the military, and pastoral-care roles. Nearly 2,300 Mission Service 
Corps volunteers are serving on home mission fields. Ehiring the year there were 1,458 church starts, the second 
highest number in 10 years. Southern Baptist churches baptized 393,811 people in 1995, an increase of nearly 
15,000 over 1994. 

Approximately half of the HMB's support comes fi-om the annual Annie Armstrong Easter Offering for 
Home Missions. In 1995, gifts to the offering totaled $38,908,339, the largest in HMB history. One hundred 
percent of the offering goes to support the work of home missionaries in the field. The 1996 Annie Armstrong 
Easter Offering goal is $42 million. About 35 percent of the HMB's income comes fi^om the denomination's 
Cooperative Program. 

The following is a summary of program/support ministry highlights fi^om 1995: 

Chaplaincy Ministries— The 2,412 Southern Baptists now serving as chaplains and pastoral counselors reported 
more than 27,000 professions of faith. During the year, 179 Southern Baptist ministers were endorsed for the first 
time by the Chaplains Commission of the SBC. 

Church Loans— The Church Loans Division closed 98 church loans totaling $25 million, including $3.4 million 
of refinancing. 

Associational Administrative Service—In more than 1,025 associations, 950 associational missionaries have an 
extremely significant role in leading churches to strategize and work in partnership to evangelize, minister, and start 
churches in all places and among all people groups. 

Language Missions— Home missionaries in the Language Church Extension Division worked among 106 ethnic 
groups and 98 American Indian tribes, using 106 languages and dialects, in addition to sign language. 
Volunteers— Volunteers continue to serve in record numbers and represent more than $100 million in value to the 
HMB. In 1995, more than 70,000 persons served as volunteers. Mission Service Corps missionaries, numbering 
2,193, represent a cadre of committ^ people responding to God's call to be personally involved in home missions. 
They were responsible for leading more than 5,600 people to Christ. 

Prayer and Spiritual Awakening— The Home Missions Intercessory Prayerline received 82,000 calls in 1995. 
Missionary prayer requests were given in more than 178,000 English and Spanish PrayerGrams. 
Mass Evangelism— This department assisted in implementing the Here's Hope. Jesus Cares for You. Harvest 
Revivals. An estimated 25,000 to 35,000 churches participated in some portion of the Here's Hope emphasis. 
Alternatives to Abortion Ministries— As a result of ministries in 37 crisis pregnancy centers, 806 persons prayed 
to receive Christ and 1,823 babies were bom. 

4200 North Point Parkway • Alpharetta, Georgia 30202-41 74 • (770) 410-6000 

A Southern Baptist Convention agency supported by the Ccxyperatwe Program arui the Annie Armstrong Easter Offering 



15 



WOMEN ON MISSIONS 



M«-n-hf=w 28- 19-20 gives us the commission to be missionaries for 
Chrlsrwom^n of our^day have a big task before us to help teach our 
SilS^r young people, an our older people about God's great 
?ove we need ?o ?ea?h them the need to see where they can help 
o?hers!we need to keep our churches informed about our missionaries 
and the many needs they have. 

This past year, our ladies had a Pastor and Wives appreciation 
dinner and we had a great turn-out. 

we prepared seven boxes of food for the North Korean famine relief 
and delivered them to Ridgecrest. 

we had fifteen ladies go to Ridgecrest for the N.C. Annual WMU 
ulJ^L last March Some of the ladies had never been to 

R?dgec?est We all had a great time and are looking forward, to 
returning next year for the annual meeting. We received special 
recognition and a plaque for having the largest percentage of WMU 
mSs there. We now have two Mission Friends groups in our 
association as a result of the trip to Ridgecrest. 

our Associational Annual Meeting was held at Mt. Ephraim. We had a 
good n^er of people present. Our speaker was a ^J^^-^^^ary from 
Brazil, our theme for the coming year is Hand in Hand. 

Remember our Association WMU Council in prayer as we nieet to plan 
even^ for the coming year. George Berry gave us a challenge to 
go? al the Associational Women on Mission, on the mission fields to 
Ih^re Christ in Back Yard Bible Schools or where ^^^^f 
the need may be. Help us pray that God will open that door for us 
and that our ladies will respond to the call. 

Pastors, deacons and lay people, thank you for your prayers and 
support. 



Eunice Luttrell 



16 



FOREIGN MISSIONS 




•AMinmucmmpm 
fotmmrmDmKjms' 

C^ur Lord has faithfully guided the Foreign 
I Mission Board's efforts through 1995. A 
' thumbnail sketch of these blessings 
includes: 

♦ A record number of newly constituted churches: 2,612 

♦ Percentage increase of newly constimted churches: 21% 

♦ Record number of total churches overseas: 39,073 

♦ Total number of members among conventions and 
unions overseas: 4. 1 1 million 

♦ Total number of baptisms overseas: 287,806 

♦ Member-to-baptism ratio overseas: 14-to-l 
(Member-to-baptism ratio in the United Stales: 40-to-l) 



Growth of new churches over the past 5 years 





♦ Number of countries served by missionaries: 131 

♦ Toul number of new missionaries appointed: 544 
» Total number of missionaries serving overseas: 4, 1 29 

* Record amount of Lottie Moon offering: $85.9 million 

♦ Total dollars appropriated for human needs: $5.85 million 

♦ New churches among least-reached peoples: 367 

♦ Baptisms among least-reached peoples: 6,548 

# Number of new cities opened to the gospel: 528 

# Number of new people groups touched with the 
gospel: 41 

♦ Number of culture groups in The Last Frontier 
2,161 

# Increase in the total number of churches: 6.65% 

# Number of Southern Baptists in short-term volunteer 
work: Over 15,000 

# Record number of Bible schools and seminaries: 595 
(a 136% increase) 

# Increase in Bible teaching ministries overseas: 11% 

♦ Increase in enrollment in discipleship programs 
overseas: 74% 

# Increase in home missionaries coming from overseas 
affihates: 44% 

♦ Increase in foreign missionaries from overseas 
affiliates: 87% 



17 



Funding the Frontier 

* Southern Baptists have given a record amount to the 
Lottie Moon Christmas Offering each of the last three years, 
reaching an unprecedented 586. 1 miUion m 1995. 

» Money collected for the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering is 
used today just as it was when the fund was first established. 
All of the money is used in the board's overseas budget. 

• The Southern Baptist Convention has 15 million resident 
members. That means the average Southern Baptist con- 
tributes $5.94 to the Lottie Moon Christmas Offenng. 

* In 1995 the Lottie Moon Chnstmas Offering had its 
largest percentage increase (3.66 percent) since 1989. 

♦ 100 percent of the Lottie Moon Chnstmas Offenng is 
used in the overseas budget for missionary support, operat- 
ing expenses and capital needs. 

« The 1996 goal of the Lottie Moon Chnstmas Offering is 
SlOO million. This will require each individual and church 
to increase giving by 12 percent. 

• Cooperative Program giving to the Southern Baptist 
Convention has increased each of the last three years, reach- 
ing a record 8145.739,489.50 in 1995; 50 percent was desig- 
nated for the Foreign Mission Board. 

♦ An average of 19 percent of Cooperauve Program funds sent 
by local churches to their state convention reaches the Foreign 
Mission Board. 

* The 1996 budget of the Foreign Mission Board, used to 
support almost 4,200 missionanes in 131 countnes, is 
5192,615,000. For the board to have 5,000 missionanes, it will 



1995 Overseas Expenses 

Capital 




1 965 Overseas Expenses 




The cost of supporting missionanes overseas tias 
increased dramatically over ttie past 30 years. 



Comparison of Lottie IVIoon and 
Cooperative Program 




$ in millions 1993 

M Lottie Moon 



1994 1995 
I Cooperative Program 



require a budget of 5266,400.000. This represents 
less than 4 percent of the projected receipts of 
Southern Baptist churches. 

* The Foreign Mission Board uses only 12.8 per- 
cent of Its entire budget for stateside administra- 
tion and support functions. 

♦ The Foreign Mission Board responds to disaster 
and other human needs through designated gifts 
to world hunger. These gifts have declined from 
nearly 512 million in 1985 to almost 56 million in 
1995, gready restricting the ability of the FMB to 
respond to these needs. 

# There are 2,161 unreached people groups. In 
order to place a missionary unit wth each 
unreached group by AD 2000, the board must 
increase its income by 27.89 percent each year. 

♦ Of every dollar given in the offering plate 
(total receipts), the Foreign Mission Board 
receives 3.13 cents. 



18 



Making Life for Older Adults. . . 

The Best of Times 



The continuing goal of Baptist Retirement 
Homes is to provide more and better services 
for Older Adults. During 1996 several 
developments have moved us toward this goal. 

Some new staff members have been 
added to help provide the kind of total 
care which residents need and deserve. 
Tanja Keqy has been employed as Vice 
President of the Health Services 
Division. Paulette Richmond came as 
the new manager of the Hamilton 
Baptist Home. Carla Hyde was named 
director of the small group program for 
residents with dementia, a program 
designed to enhance their quality of 
life. Patricia Fling is the director of 
the In Home Care program which 
began a few months ago. Dr. Earl 
Watts, an Associate Professor at the 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine, is 
serving as the medical director for In 
Home Care. 

Early in the year, renovation of the 
Hamilton Baptist Home was completed 
providing a more attractive and 
comfortable place for residents in that 
facility. The new Cecil and Gertrue 
Young Solarium at the Rickman 
Nursing Center in Asheville will provide 
space for the small group program for 
residents with dementia. At Brookridge, 
renovated space in the Assisted Living 
section, and named "Stokes Court ", 
will house the new Assisted Independent 
Living Unit. A new passenger van will 
facilitate transportation for residents at 
the Taylor House in Albemarle as they 
attend church, keep appointments, go 
shopping, or participate in 



social/recreational events. 

During the year, Baptist Retirement 
Homes has provided assistance in the 
planning for Cliffwood, a new 
continuing care retirement community 
being built in Fayetteville. Two 
Fayetteville churches. First Baptist and 
Snyder Memorial Baptist, have formed a 
non-profit corporation to lead this 
project. A 27 acre site has been 
selected. Plans call for 105 Independent 
Living units, 20 beds in Assisted Living, 
and 20 beds in a nursing care unit. All 
units will be available on a rental basis 
with no entrance fees. 

The James M. Hayes Society has been 
formed to recognize and thank those 
persons who remember the Baptist 
Retirement Homes in their estate planning. 
Thirty-three charter members constitute 
this group named in honor of the 
"Homes "founding superintendent. 

Finally, we recognize with deep gratitude 
those North Carolina Baptists who gave 
through their churches to support the 
ministry during the past year. Through 
the cooperative program, the special 
February Offering, and other church gifts, 
the "Homes " received a total of 
$1,030,052 during the 12 month period 
ending September 30, 1995. 

The trustees and staff are grateful to North 
Carolina Baptists for helping us to make life for 
Older Aduhs The Best of Times! 

William B. Stillerman, President 
Baptist Retirement Homes of North Carolina, Inc. 



19 



BAFnSrRETTREMB^HQMES 

OF NORTH CAROLINA, INC. 



For Your Information..* 

Baptist Retirement Homes of North Carolina, Inc. 

Fact Sheet 

What Is Baptist Retirement Homes? 

Founded in 1951, Baptist Retirement Homes of North Carolina, Inc. (BRH) is one of North Carolina's 
most respected providers of long-term care. With four retirement communities throughout the state, BRH 
provides all levels of care for Older Adults, including special programs for conditions such as Alzheimer's 
Disease. BRH also owns and operates a home health program that provides certified nursing and therapy ser- 
vices to homebound individuals. Baptist Retirement Homes is a not-for-profit, church-affiliated organization. 

Where Are BRH Facilities Located And What Services Do They Offer? 

Brookridge Retirement Community is a 44-acre continuing care retirement community in Winston- 
Salem, established in 1989. Brookridge offers its 300 residents independent and assisted independent living 
opportunities, as well as assisted living and nursing services. Accommodations range from garden homes to 
apartments to assisted living and nursing care in single rooms at the Prince Nursing Center. The Brookridge 
Transitional Care Unit opened in 1995, offering post-acute medical care on site. Home health care is also 
available on site through In Home Care, Inc., a Baptist Retirement Homes affiliate. Brookridge is a full-service 
retirement community, offering meal service, nursing services, recreational activities, housekeeping, religious 
activities and more. For more information, contact: 

Brad McJlwain or Elizabeth Vick • Brookridge Retirement Community 
1199 Hayes Forest Drive • Wmston-Salem , NC 27106 • 9 10-7 59-1644 

The Western North Carolina Baptist Home (WNCBH) is located on a 22-acre tract atop Richmond 
Hill in northwest Asheville. The Home offers residents assisted living and nursing care, as well as assisted inde- 
pendent living. Established in 1979, the Home was recently renovated and expanded to accommodate 150 
residents. WNCBH is a full-service retirement facility, offering meal service, nursing services, recreational 
activities, housekeeping, laundry, religious activities, and more. For more information, contact: 

John Dwyer • Western North Carolina Baptist Home 
213 Richmond Hill Drive • Asheville, NC 28806 • 704-254-9675 

The Hamilton Baptist Home is a 30-bed assisted living facility located on 18 acres in Hamilton, in eastern 
North Carolina. Recently renovated to enhance the comfort of the residents, the Home has been in operation 
since 1963. Services include all daily meals, recreational activities, housekeeping, laundry services, medication 
assistance, religious activities and more. For more information, contact: 

Paulette Richmond • Hamilton Baptist Home 
301 North Railroad Street • Hamilton, NC 27840 • 919-798-5901 

The Taylor House is home to 30 residents in Albemarle, in North Carolina's Piedmont region. Situated in 
a residential neighborhood. The Taylor House opened in 1954 and was totally renovated in 1994. It offers a 
full range of assisted living services, including three meals daily, housekeeping, private rooms, laundry service, j 
medication monitoring, recreational and religious activities and more. For more information, contact: 

Helen Benoy • The Taylor House 
319 Palmer Street • Albemarle, NC'28001 • 704-982-4217 ' 



20 



Are Residents Of Baptist Retirement Homes Primarily Baptists? 

At the Brookndge Community, 70% of the resident population is Baptist. About 90% of the resident 
population of the Western North Carolina Baptist Home is Baptist. The Taylor House and the Hamilton 
Baptist Home are primarily composed of Baptist residential populations. 

What Is The Cost Of Services? Are Financial Resocrces Axailarle 

For Those Who Cannot P.ay? 

Fees vary accordinc; to facilities and the level ot care chixsen or required bv residents. A full schedule of fee 
for each facility is available upon request. There are no entrance tees associated with any of the health-related 
facilities owned and operated by Baptist Retirement Homes. The Hamilton Baptist Home and the Tavlor 
House are among the lew not-tor-protit, church-related, long-term care facilities in North Carolina with no 
financial requirements tor admission. Contributions received trom the Baptist State Con\'ention Cooperati\ e 
Program and from local Baptist churches across the state are used exclusively to help BRH provide care for 
those Older Adults in either assisted li\-ing or nursing care who are unable to pav the tuU cost ot their care. 

Does The Baptist State Conxtntion Of North Carolina 
Support Baptist Retirement Homes? 

Baptist Retirement Homes is attiliated with the Baptist State Convention ot North Carolina, but is a 
separate and distinct corporate entitv. Messengers ot the churches that compose the Baptist State Convention 
select BRH board members. In 1995, tunds recei\ ed from the Con\'ention Cooperative Program and gitts trom 
local Baptist churches totaled approximately $1.1 million. All ot those monies are being used to support Older 
Adults living in assisted living or nursing care who lack sutticient resources to pay for the care they receive. 

How Can I Make A Referral Or Receix e Aooitional Inform.ation? 

You mav make a reterral or request intormation about a particular home bv contacting the person listed in 
the BRH tacilities section (abcne), or by calling Emily Rea\es at Bapti>t Retirement Homes (910-725-0202). 




BAFnSTRFnREviesTHOMLS 



OF NORTH CAROLINA, INC 

P.O. Box 11024 • Wmston-Salem, NC • 27116-1024 • 910-725-0202 



I 



•f* Baptist Children's Homes of North Carolina - 1996 

Evelyn Alexander, Chairman of the Board 



Primed for excitement after three hours 
waiting under a bright summer sky, 
hundreds of spectators craned their necks 
and peered toward downtown Asheville 
June 26 when Michael Owen jogged into view - 
carrying the Olympic Torch on outstretched arm. 
Michael, one of 1,422 children Baptist Children's 
Homes served in 1995-96, lives at Broyhill Home in 
Clyde, one of 12 facilities BCH operates in North 
CaroUna. 

Smiling and waving to the crowds holding 
aloft tiny flags and cameras, Michael lifted the 
symbol of international unity and pointed to friends 
among those who lined the parade routp. 

The entire Broyhill Home campus showed 
up, cheering vdldly. They ate picrucs at the end of 
Michael's route, and swarmed him when he passed 
the flame to the next carrier - a bicycle rider. 

It could have been a family reunion, or a 
school scene, or a re-creation for a movie on family 
support. But Michael, and most of his supporters, 
are children who have suffered unspeakable abuses 
at the hands of adults they trusted to care for them. 

And the adults who waded into that mob 
scene of joy at the end of Michael's run are called of 
God to help young people like Michael and those 
who surrounded him deal with those issues, and to 
overcome them. 

As a hoy, Michael was so ashamed of his 
clothes he ran home from school, never stopping to 
make friends. Worse, he endured almost nightly 
beatings from his father. He was 11 years old before 
he realized other boys weren't beaten every night. 
Four years later he found the courage to tell his 
father he was leaving. 

"Go ahead, call someone," he yelled. 
"Leave." 

Michael left. After six months in emergency 
care at Mills Home in Thomasville, he established a 
more permanent residence at Broyhill Home. Slowly, 
quietly his emotions mounted within him until one 
night he erupted and spilled forth his story, the 
years of secrets and lies, to his child are worker, 
Betty Porter. "She stayed up with me and we talked 
a long time," Michael said. That was his first lesson 



in trust and unconditional love. 

"Broyhill has changed my life so much," 
Michael said. "For almost a year I didn't trust 
anybody, but finally I felt a calmness I know was the 
Lord. Here I found the Lord and now I try to live 
every day for Fiim." 

Michael's story is repeated hundreds of 
times each year at Baptist Children's Homes of 
North Carolina. Not all are as dramatic as a boy who 
grew from a punching bag to a torch bearer. 

But at four residential campuses, six emer- 
gency care cottages, two homes for behaviorally 
troubled girls, a maternity home, a home for teenage 
mothers and their babies, therapeutic camping and 
model day care, more than 1,400 children and their 
families find help in a troubled time. 

During the past year BCH received almost 
$1.5 million through the Cooperative Program, and 
$663,00 through the Thanksgiving Offering. Total 
church gifts of almost $3 million comprised 26.2 
percent of BCH operating revenue. 

BCH is in the midst of a $10.1 "Light Their 
Way" Campaign to raise money for operations, 
capital needs and endowment. At the halfway point 
in June, more than $5.4 million had been committed 
to BCH through the campaign. 

Videos of the children's presentation at the 
1995 State Baptist Convention are available by 
calling the communications office at (800) 476-3669. 
You can also ask for the latest videos to tell you 
about your ministry to children and families 
through Baptist Children's Homes of North Caro- 
lina. 

Although Michael carries many fond 
memories of Baptist Children's Homes wdth him as 
he heads for college this Fall, his earliest amaze- 
ments were the secure sleep he got when he laid his 
head down, and of receiving his first pair of Nikes 
so he didn't have to be embarrassed by his appear- 
ance. 

From head to toe BCH cares for children and 
families. Thank you for helping to Light Their Way. 

Michael C. Blackwell 

President since 1983 



22 



Meeting the 
Challenges of 
Health Care 

1996 



Report to 

the Association 




'Touching Lives With Hope 



HOSPITAL HIGHLIGHTS FOR 1996 

DIVISION OF PASTORAL CARE 

During this year the 18 to 40 Chaplains present at various times at the Hospital made over 55,000 pastoral contacts. 

As of July 1, 1996, the counseling centers will be called CareNet, Inc., of The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Inc. 
Over 26,000 hours of counseling were provided through the eleven centers across the state of North Carolina. Two 
additional centers will open in the fall of this year. 

The Center for Congregational Health has. since inception in 1992, provided ministry at some level to over 225 
North Carolina Baptist Churches. 

Mission dollars from the Cooperative Program enabled the above ministries to be carried out and to touch thousands 
of lives. 

BAPTIST BENEVOLENT CARE FUND 

North Carolina Baptists joined us in a mutual mission through the Mother's Day Offering. We channeled every 
penny of the MDO. which amounted to $461,647, to help patients who had no health-care insurance and no financial 
means to pay their hospital bills. We are grateful to everyone who made this ministry possible. 

POINTS OF EMPHASIS AND PROGRESS 

Financial Stewardship - The Medical Center is constantly seeking ways to lighten the financial burden of those who 
are ill. Recently the room rates were reduced by $50 per day. 

Aegis - This is an alliance of primary-care clinicians who serve patients regardless of their medical plans or HMO/PPG 
affiliated. "Aegis" means protection or sponsorship: Aegis Family Health Centers is a network of primary care physi- 
cians affiliated with The Medical Center. It now has 33 providers in 10 practice sites. 

QualChoice of North Carolina - QualChoice is The Medical Center's managed care company. Eighteen months 
old, it serves approximately 30,500 enrollees, giving quality health-care and patient/physician choice. 

Regional Integrated Information Network - RIDS is a regional computer network now in the pilot phases. The 
network allows providers in the region to exchange patient information electronically, saving time and money. RIDS is 
a plan which assists communities in our service area to develop a coordinated continuum of care. In this plan, primary 
care physicians, community hospitals, nursing homes and other patient care providers link their services with those of 
The Medical Center. The desired outcome is improved patient care and cost-effective services. 

The J. Paul Sticht Center on Aging - The Center devotes itself to the special problems of older adults. When the 
center moves to its new home in 1996. its services will not only provide specialized health care but will also include a 
day care program for the elderly that will serve as a link between hospital and home, helping to reduce rates of rehos- 
pitalization and premature placement in nursing homes. 

A CLOSING WORD 

Since its founding in 1922, the Hospital has taken pride in our ministry of service. In doing so, we seek to make 
tomorrow's patient care and tomorrow's workplace constantly better. That has been our mission historically, and it 
continues to this day. I firmly believe that our best lies yet ahead, and I am committed to that reality. 

Respectfully submitted. 




Len B. Preslar, Jr. 
President 

The North Carolina Baptist Hosptials, Incorporated 



The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated 

23 



Since 1834 North Carolina Baptist Colleges and Universities have 
been privileged to have many splendid presidents. The current presidents 
are listed on this page. They were elected to take the lead in dreaming, 
shaping and managing Baptist higher education in North Carolina. 

Two colleges. Mars Hill and Chowan, have new presidents. 
Let us introduce them to you. 

Dr. A. Max Lennon was named president of Mars Hill College, 
effective March 1 Both he and Mrs Lennon (Ruth Ann) are graduates of 
Mars Hill. Dr. Lennon brings a rich background in business and higher 
education to his new task. After earning the B.S. and Ph.D. degrees at 
North Carolina State University, he served in the administration of Texas 
Tech University, the University of Missouri, Ohio State University and 
Clemson University, where he was the president. He comes to Mars Hill 
from the presidency of Eastern Foods, Inc. in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. 
Lennon, an active Baptist churchman, has been a member of the National 
Fellowship of Baptist Men. In Atlanta they were members of the First 
Baptist Church in Peachtree City, where he taught Sunday School and was 
a member of the strategic planning committee. He is on the board of 
directors of numerous corporations and foundations, among them First 
Union Corporation and Duke Power. In accepting the presidency of Mars 
Hill he said, "This is a wonderful opportunity to provide leadership for this 
college and boldly proclaim our faith in Jesus Christ." 

Dr. Stanley G. LoU moved to North Carolina in July to become 
president of Chowan College. He comes from Louisiana College, a Baptist 
school, where he was vice president for academic affairs for 15 years. 
Earlier he has been a faculty member at Tift College in Georgia. Dr. Lott 
earned two doctorates, one in systematic theology from New Orleans 
Baptist Theological Seminary, and the other in higher education 
administration from the University of Georgia. An ordained Baptist 
minister, he has held two pastorates in Louisiana. Mercer University 
president Kirby Godsey said, "Stanley Lott is one of the finest educators 
and leaders in higher education today." Dr. and Mrs. Lott (Johnnye) were 
long-time, active members of Emmanuel Baptist Church, near Louisiana 
College. Upon his election the new president said, "I look forward to 
joining hands with all who are part of Chowan College. I am also eager to 
join North Carolina Baptists in their efforts to spread the gospel and to 
preserve historic Baptist principles." 



IVomaan A. Wigguu 

Campbell University 



Stanley G. Lott 

Chowan College 



M. Christopher Whi 

Gardner-Webb University 



A. Max liennon 

Mars Hill College 



John E. Weems 

Meredith College 



Jerry E. McCiee 

Wingate University 



Thomas K. Heam, J 

Wake Forest University 



24 



July, 1996 



BISl 



It 


BAPnSI SIATE CONVtNIION OF NC 





MEMORANDUM 



To: 



From: 



Subject: 



Directors of Associational Missions 



T. Robert Mullinax 



College Report for Associational Meetings 



We hope you can include the Council on Christian Higher Education's report in some way 
during your annual meeting. 

Two copies are enclosed : (1) One for you, and (2) one for your Christian higher 
education representative, if you have one. 

If you would like to invite a college person to be on program, you can write or call 
any of the persons listed below. They will gladly help you. 

Call on us if we can help you. 

TRM/bhc 

Enclosures: 2 

Campbell Universitw Buies Creek 27506 - Jerry Wood - (910-893-1219) 
Chowan College, Murfreesboro 27855 - Hargus Taylor - (919-398-6321) 
Gardner-Webb University Boiling Springs 28017 - Bnice Rabon - (704-434-4256) 
Mars Hill College, Mars Hdl 28754 - Paula Clayton Dempsey - (704-689-1128) 
Meredith College. Raleigh 27607 - Sam Carothers - (919-829-8346) 
Wake Forest University. Winston-Salem 27109 - Lynn Parker - (910-759-5225) 
Winsate Universitw Wingate 281 74 - Lynn Moss - (704-233-8241) 



T. ROBERT MULLINAX, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR/ POST OFFICE BOX 1107 




CARV, NORTH CAROLINA 27512-1107/ (919)487-5100/ (800)395-5102 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST FOUNDATION, INC. 
1995 ANNUAL REPORT 





14 - 




12 ■ 




10 - 


1 — 


8 - 


5 






6 - 




4 - 




2 




n - 



Distributions 

1920-1995 



1920-1979 




1980-1983 1984-1987 1988-1991 



Individuals ■ Charity 



1992-1995 



The mission of the North Carolina Baptist Foundation since its inception in 
1920 has been to assist the Convention and its institutions and agencies in 
generating endowment to enhance their permanent financial support. The 
uniqueness of the ministries and services provided by the institutions and General 
Board staff merits increased individual collective financial support. The Baptist 
Foundation is committed to assisting individual church members through creative 
stewardship methods to provide permanent financial undergirding of these 
ministries. 

As of December 31, 1995, the Foundation held $55,608,452 under 
management. In 1995, $3,144,471 was distributed to Baptist work and $1,125,383 
was distributed to individuals for a total distribution of $4,269,854. 

The income distributions for the entire 76 year history of the N. C. Baptist 
Foundation totals: $9,673,682 income paid to individuals and $13,458,579 to 
Baptist churches, institutions and mission causes for a grand historical total of 
$23,132,261. 



W. Jesse Spencer, Chairman of the Board 
Edwin S. Coates, Executive Director 



26 



BOrtical Becorder 




^ ^ ^^^^^ .;,,,,„j,.. l tuu>ii. i L.i. i .iJ-i.l 1. 1 i j I I ' I I 1 LL«^.^i.i.iLH S,^mm»iniu 

P 6 Box 26568. ZIP 27611 ♦ 232 W. Millbrook Road ♦ Raleigh. North Carolina 27609 
Phone 919-847-2127 ♦ Fax 919-847-6939 ♦ Email CompuServe 70420,133 



REPORT TO THE ASSOCIATION— 1996 



The headlines each day — Bosnia, Belfast, Saudi Arabia, taxes, school 
funding, presidential elections, etc. — often include Southern Baptists. The 
secular media show special interest in our conflicts but all too often do 
not tell the whole story of the good things Baptists are doing. 

The Biblical Recorder attempts to tell the whole story — the many 
positive things people are doing in their churches along with the negative 
issues which cannot be concealed and ignored if we honor our heritage from 
yesterday and fulfill our mission for tomorrow. 

There is no way to address these issues without correct and reliable 
information. The Biblical Recorder was born and continues to serve for that 
purpose. In the 163 years of state Baptist papers in North Carolina, never 
was the Recorder more needed than now for people to have the truth. We live 
in an electronic media age where many think they have the answers to the 
issues but they do not because they do not read, only look and listen! 

An informed Baptist is a better Baptist; an uninformed Baptist may be 
an uninvolved or disruptive Baptist. No democracy, including our local 
churches, can survive long without an informed, involved constituency which 
makes decisions based upon accurate information from reliable sources. 

The Biblical Recorder should be in every Baptist home in North 
Carolina. Your support as a subscriber and reader, coupled with your 
encouragement to others, will enable the paper to better serve the 
constituency with accurate and helpful information. 



In order to save churches large amounts of money and to increase the 
readership of the Recorder , Church News Service (CNS) was launched in 1990. 
This system lets any congregation have their church news incorporated into 
the Biblical Recorder which saves staff time, postage and printing 
costs. Usually, for less than what it costs to produce the church 
newsletter, CNS gives the entire Baptist communication package to each 
family in the congregation. Recent and anticipated increases in mailing 
costs make CNS a greater value in 1996-97 than when it was started in 1990. 

The paper focuses more and more attention on North Carolina Baptists 
with news, features and inspirational articles which will encourage in- 
dividuals and churches in their witness and ministry. One sure way to 
conquer problems and overcome the barriers to effective witness and ministry 
is to have the facts, know the issues and be adequately informed. 

That is why the Recorder was born; that is why it serves today. For 
more information on how your church can subscribe or use CNS, contact: 

The Biblical Recorder 
232 West Millbrook Road 
Raleigh, NC 27609 



27 



ASSOCIATIONAL DISCIPLESHIP 
SUPPORTER REPORT 



The Associational Discipleship Training goal for Stony Fork 
Association is to serve as a support system for the discipling 
efforts of the local churches. Those serving in associational 
discipleship leadership do so in order to encourage and assist the 
churches to discover discipling needs, determine strategies to meet 
those needs, and make every effort to provide for the spiritual 
progression of the people. 

Therefore, the goal is to begin new discipling processes and to 
strengthen and support the existing growth options. 

"M" Night was held at Laytown Baptist Church. There were 
approximately fifty people in attendance. 



Charles Craig 



28 



DID YOU KNOW? 

NORTH CAROLINA MISSIONS OFFERING FACT SHEET 

The mission needs in North Carolina are substantial. Did you know that in 
North Carolina there are: 

Over 7.3 million residents 

Over 32,000 prison inmates 

Over 21 ,000 blind persons 

Over 12,000 deaf persons 

Over 50,000 migrant farm workers 

Over 8 million tourists who visit our state every year 

Over 3.5 million unchurched people 

Through the North Carolina Missions Offering, we can offer help and hope! 



$1 a day provides materials to reach 10 unchurched people. 
$3.50 serves a hot meal to a disaster victim. 

$5 puts a Bible in the hands of someone helped during disaster relief efforts. 

$6 provides dental care for one patient on the Medical/Dental bus. 

$10 provides people who don't speak English with a Bible in their own 
language. 

$1 1 enables a deaf person to attend an evangelistic deaf rally and banquet. 

$25 sends a magazine subscription (with overseas postage) to a North 
Carolina-born foreign missionary. 

$50 supplies two soccer balls for an overseas sports mission team. 

$85 pays for one prison inmate to attend a three-day retreat at Mundo Vista. 

$95 sends a disadvantaged child to a Baptist camp for one week. 

$100 provides tracts for a holiday rest stop ministry. 

$300 assists an association with a Mother-Daughter retreat. 

$500 supplements a pastor's salary for a new language church start. 

$700 buys a new pressure washer for Disaster Recovery. 



Baptist State Convention of NC 



29 



The North Carolina Missions Offering 

in the 
Stony Fork Association 

Most of the North Carolina Missions Offering supports projects in the 81 
associations (covering all 100 counties) across North Carolina. Many North 
Carolina Missions Offering projects are actually association/state missions 
programs receiving money and leadership support from both the Baptist 
State Convention and local associations. Last year (1995), $1,265.55 was 
collected from 2 of Stony Fork Association's 7 churches and missions (listed 
on reverse). 

In 1995, the North Carolina Missions Offering also supported NC Woman's 
Missionary Union, NC Baptist Men (Brotherhood), and Youth and Campus 
Ministries. The number of individuals in the Stony Fork Association who 
participated in these groups in 1995 includes: 

1 Person(s) attending NC WMU Annual Session 
(Missions Extravaganza) 



Churches giving to the 1995 special offering: 

STONY FORK 



LAYTOWN 
SAiNDY FLAT 



Would if not be a great blessing if 100% of our churches took up the 
special offering for North Carolina State Missions? 




30 



stewardship Report 
for 

STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Annual Meeting 

Aug 10,1996 



As I read over some of my previous reports while 
preparing to write this I realized that a lot of the time I 
come to these meetings and scold us for what we have failed 
to do. I had to ask myself " Dont you ever have any thing 
good to say ?" I truly feel that this year I can give us an 
"attaboy" for the work we have done. I think that more 
important than the work accomplished is the spirit that has 
led us to find needs and fill them. More and more I find that 
we are looking for a place where our talents match the needs 
that are around us. This, my friends, is good stewardship. 

Lets take a quick look at the record. In the last year 
we have sent construction teams to two sister churches, 
helped on the hospital bill of two of our members who were in 
need, sent two men to the North Carolina Baptist State 
Convention, Helped send 15 ladies to the WMU conference, sent 
two to the Discipleship Training conference and did it all on 
less than $2500. Again, good stewardship. 

The question now is, what next? It seems to me that the 
talent needed most now might be the talent to communicate. If 
we can only take back some of the spirit that energizes us an 
give it to the people we worship with we will have used our 
resources well indeed. Leave here talking about Gods work. 
Brag about what the Lord has done in the life of our 
association. Can you think of anything better to tell people 
about? 



Respectfully Submitted 
Roy Gryder 



31 



RESOLUTIONS 



Stony Fork Baptist Association 



WHEREAS Long Ridge Baptist Church has been a long-standing 
part of the Stony Fork Baptist Association, and 

WHEREAS they have provided long and continued support of the 
Association and its goals and endeavors, and 

WHEREAS they have remained in close and harmonious fellowship 
with the other churches in the Association, and 

WHEREAS they at this time feel that they will be more 
effective in the work of the Lords Kingdom if 
affiliated with Avery Baptist Association, 
let it be now 

RESOLVED that the churches who make up the Stoney Fork 

Baptist Association do hereby express the hope that 
Long Ridge Baptist Church will achieve great success 
in their further endeavors for the Lord and that 
many precious souls will come to a saving knowledge 
of Christ through their efforts. 

This the 10th day of August, 1996 

Also, let it be resolved that the Stony Fork Association expresses its 
thanks and appreciation to Laytown and Long Ridge Baptist Churches for 
their hospitality and delicious food. 

We would also like to express our thanks to God for the wonderful Christian 
fellowship and the excellent reports and speakers we have heard the past 
two days . 

Betty Woods 



32 



STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
APPROVED BUDGET 
FOR 
1996 - 1997 



DIRECTOR OF MISSIONS: 
ANNUITY FOR DIR. OF MISSIONS: 
CLERK HONORARIUM: 
TREASURER HONORARIUM: 
VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL: 
DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING: 
SUNDAY SCHOOL: 
EVANGELISM: 

EVANGELISM CONFERENCE: 
WOMEN ON MISSION: 
CONVENTION (2 PEOPLE) : 
CLERICAL: 
PHONE : 

TOTAL 



OBITUARIES 1995-1996 



Bailey's Camp - Mr. William Ford 

Mr. Ransom Harmon, Deacon 

Doe Ridge - Mr. Walter Tester, Deacon 

Long Ridge - Mr. Ray Clark 

Rock Spring - Mr. Clinard Triplett 



$3,000.00 
900.00 
250.00 
250.00 
200.00 
150.00 
200.00 
125.00 
200.00 
250.00 
200.00 
50.00 
75.00 
$5,850.00 



33 



PROCEEDINGS 
FOR 

THE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTT-FIFTY ANNUAL MEETING 

OF 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION 

The annual meeting was called to order at 8:30 on Friday, August 9, 
1996 at Laytown Baptist Church by the Moderator, Ron Burgett. The 
meeting was conducted in the following order: 

8:35 Song - "Prayer Bells of Heaven". 
8:35 Prayer - Arvill Hardy. 
8:45 Special singing - Mike Minton. 
8:50 Devotion - Psalms 136:1-18, Give thanks. 
8:55 Adoption of program. 
Roll call 

Bailey's Camp 5, Doe Ridge 5, Laytown 1, Long Ridge 0, 
Mt. Ephraim 3, Rock Spring 4, Sandy Flat 6. 

9:00 Recognition of new pastors and workers - Danny Murphy, 
Laytown . 

9:05 Prayer - Max West 

9:10 Vacation Bible School - Barbara West. Needs reports 

from churches having VBS this year. (Speaker tomorrow) 

9:15 Financial Report - Edith Gryder. Report given. Copies of 
proposed budget for 1996-1997 presented to members. Will 
vote on budget tomorrow. 

9:20 Women on Mission - Eunice Luttrell. The Annual State 

Meeting was held at Ridgecrest this spring. Two Mission 
Friends organizations were started in the association as 
a direct results of the annual meeting. I would like to 
remind the association that the N.C. State Missions Offering 
is the source of income for the WMU and Brotherhood starting 
this year so be sure to promote this offering in your 
church. 

9:30 Home Missions - George Berry. We have gone to New York and 
New Jersey in the past. This year we went to Ruppard, 
W. Va. , the most exciting mission trip I have been on so 
far. A man watched us work, laying under a tree, who 
had lost his family and was shunned by the town because of 
alcohol. He has since had his hair cut, had a bath, and is 
now attending church there. Last Sunday, this little 
church we helped had 22 in attendance. Churches all over 
the SBC have helped this church to be built. The fellowship 
is great on these mission trips and we invite any of you 
to go with us next year. The Lord will bless you. If you 
want to heal a sick church, feed it a diet of missions. If 
you truly love people, go on a mission trip. 

9:50 Break 

10:15 Song - "Victory in Jesus". 
Prayer - Moderator 

10:25 Retirement Homes - Calvin Knight. I was recently in a home 
where both members were in their 70 's and were thinking of 
their future as they were having health problems and had no 
family to help them. They were looking for a place to spend 



34 



the rest of their days. I hear similar stories several 
times a day. We are getting older and living longer in 
this country where health care is so readily available. 
The average age for men is 74 and women 80 years old. 
It is projected that by the year 2020 800,000 people in 
the U.S. will be 100 years old. There are over 6 million 
people 65 and older in the U.S. today who reguire some 
help with activities of daily living. N.C. Baptist 
opened the first home for the elderly in 1961. Today, we 
have four homes taking care of 500 residents. This is a 
distinctive Christian ministry, to try to meet all their 
needs at what ever level of care they require. The 
retirement village is for those who can do most of their own 
care, assisted living is for those who require some 
help, nursing care for those who need assistance with most 
of their care and transition care which is new and is for 
those going from hospital care back to their previous 
level of care. Our Alzheimer's activities unit is in 
Asheville where we have been able to help many people 
with dementia participate for several hours a day plus 
a support group for their families and caregivers. 
New this year is in home care - going into homes where 
the elderly need home visits from nurses and other 
therapists, but are still able to do most of their own 
care . 

God expects us to look after our older people and provide 
the best care possible for them. You have a part in this 
ministry when you contribute to the special offering in 
Feb. for the Retirement Homes. 

Children's Homes - Bill Morrow. We are family friendly and 
child focused at the Children's Homes. Several years ago 
focus was more on rescue the child. We believe God intended 
the family to be together as much as possible. We try to 
help them work together to resolve the problem that caused 
the child to come into care. This is not an easy task but 
it can be done with a lot of work and prayer. We rejoice 
with the children when they are able to go back home and 
live as a family is suppose to live. We have four major 
campuses. Last year we served 1400 children. The average 
stay is 14-16 months but in some instances they can never 
return home. Then we help them prepare for adult living 
when we and they realize returning home is not an option. 
We received $663,000 last year from the Thanksgiving 
offering. The goal this year is $675,000. Some church 
groups are doing the mile of pennies offering or $844.40. 
If your church can't do a mile, do a half or a quarter of 
a mile. Children can bring in their pennies and feel they 
are a part of missions. 46% of children living with single 
mothers live below the poverty level. The breakdown of the 
family is the cause of many problems in our society today. 
In so many families, the biological father is not present. 



35 



Children need love and stability in their lives. In 
emergency care they stay 60 days until the best level of 
care can be determined for the child. 

One of your men, Michael, carried the Olympic torch through 
his part of the state this past year, because he maintained 
a 4.0 grade point average after coming to us and going to 
high school. He is now attending community college. Thank 
you for the opportunity of working together to provide for 
these children. (Special prayer for these special children 
was led by George Berry. ) 

11:10 Baptist Hospital - Jim Murphy. What do you mean to your 
institution? Since it is your hospital, it will never 
belong to a large conglomerate. When you think of Baptist 
Hospital, think of someone you have helped because you 
you have given money through the Mother's Day Offering. 
Don't think about buildings, think about flesh and blood 
people. My purpose for being here toady is to say thank you 
for helping your hospital to touch lives. Come visit me and 
I will show you around your hospital, bring a group. 

11:20 Christian Higher Education - A. Max Lennon, President of 
Mars Hill College. Our role is to seek education in a 
Christian environment. We need educated people who 
understand Christian values (Proverbs 8:10-11 and chapter 
9:9-10). Your money is used to help those who need some 
assistance with finances so they can pursue their education. 
We try to do our part as part of the community but we are 
also connected to the world through our students. We have 
a mission field that represents the work with our 
international students. One of our students was sent to 
us by Dr. Billy Graham, who recommended Mars Hill. 

We want to do all we can to answer God's calling to help 
students to find their place in God's Kingdom. Send your 
young people to Mars Hill where we see a Christian 
environment. 

11:35 Stewardship/Cooperative Program - Ken Batts. Stewardship 
is much more than money because money in itself has no value 
but how we use it and how God uses us is what matters. God 
gives us the ability to gain that which is His to give God 
has given us principals to help us be good stewards: 1. 
Work. 2. Save. 3. Plan a budget. 4. Do not love money. 

Proverbs 30 - "give me neither poverty or riches, but enough 
for this day." God has made us stewards, we must accept 
this as a trust. Faithfulness to God is what matters, we 
first give ourselves to Him. Money does not bring us that 
peace as we face difficulties of life. Be ever mindful of 
the opportunities we have. 

We have heard all the stories this morning about how lives 



36 



have been touched and changed. Thank you so much for the 
money you give through the Cooperative Program and special 
offerings to advance God's Kingdom. 

12:10 Annual Message - Danny Murphy. We can be just as close to 
God as we want to be and we can have as much of God as we 
want. Revelation 2:1-4 - we live in a busy time, sometimes 
we hardly have time to breathe. We can still have victory 
no matter how bad things get. The things we do for God are 
not done in vain, because He knows our works. He also knows 
our patience, one of the fruits. He knows we need to be 
with other believers and cannot bear those that are evil. 
There are some people who have been in the battle for a long 
time and are on the point of fainting and feel that no one 
knows but God knows. 

God knows what we do but he wants our love, our attention 
and our service. When you fall in love with Jesus, it is 
not work anymore. It is not a burden to study His word or 
go to church. We forget our first love when we try to serve 
Him because someone expects us to, rather than because we 
have a real desire to serve Him. We need to come back to 
our first love, and we need God more today than ever before. 

1:00 Adjourn - Lunch 

PROCEEDINGS 

FOR 
SECOND DAY 
AT 

LONG RIDGE BAPTIST CHURCH 
AUGUST 10, 1996 

8:30 Call to order by Moderator. 

8:35 Song "Take My Hand Precious Lord" 

8 : 40 Prayer - Roy Kanupp 

8:45 Devotion: Richard Clark - Read from previous messages 

preached at associational meetings, showing us the needs 
we are to meet. ) 

8:55 Roll Call 

Bailey's Camp 2, Doe Ridge 6, Laytown 1, Long Ridge 4, 
Mt. Ephraim 0, Rock Spring 6, Sandy Flat 3, Visitors 2. 

9:05 Discipleship Training - Charles Craig. Luke 14:26-33. We 
are discipleship trainers as that is what Jesus teaches us 
to be. We are to love God above all other things. We are 
to grow more like God, as He wants us to grow and learn 
more . 

I would like to try something this year for "M" Night that 
we've never done before, and will be different and a 
surprise. Our churches are dying today because we are not 
reaching the children. Where are the children? We are not 
providing what they need when they do come. 
9:25 Vacation Bible School - Sharon Kephart. Children will come 



37 



to Vacation Bible School that will never come to anything 
else in the church. We put everything in us into that week 
and the children can sense that. VBS can win more children 
to the Lord than everything else you do for the year 
combined. I encourage each church to plan a VBS for next 
year and I will be glad to help you organize it. 
9:30 Women on Mission - Eunice Luttrell. Matt. 28:19-20. Pray 
that God will open the door for a mission trip for our 
ladies. 

9:35 Sunday School and General Board - Fred Luncford. Reaching 
people and growing churches - church size doesn't matter, 
we are all God's people. The churches that are growing are 
the ones training their people and their new converts. 
The General Board is made up of representatives from each 
association. Ron Burgett will represent Stony Fork. These 
men need to be prayed for as they make decisions. There are 
more smaller churches in N.C. than any other kind. They 
think they can't do things because the devil keeps telling 
them this, and big churches, the associations, and the SBC 
is passing by on the other side as did the priest and the 
Levite did in the story of the good Samaritan, and letting 
them die. 

Matt. 9:36. To have a good Sunday School, you must be a 
caring church, have compassion for the lost, thousands and 
thousands are lost in our land, we must be convinced of 
this. We must be committed to witnessing to others. 
Continuing / do not grow weary in well-doing. Continue to 
do the work. Have confidence - if you feed your faith it 
will grow, if you feed your doubts, they will grow. You 
can be sure which ever you feed will grow. God is going 
to win the battle and the war. 
10:00 Break 

10:30 Prayer - Arvil Hardy. 

10:35 Ted Triplett, Sunday School Director at Rock Spring shared 
some of his ideas about Sunday School and growth. 

10:40 State Missions - Sharon Kepart. The N.C. State Missions 

Offering is often overlooked because of the more recognized 
mission offerings. This is taken in Sept. One dollar a day 
could reach 10 unreached people through the Church 
Extension Dept. provided materials. Two dollars sends a 
birthday care to a N.C. born foreign missionary. All of 
WMU and Brotherhood funds will come through this offering. 
Ten percent of what Stony Fork Assoc. gives will come back 
to you to be used by the association. Phil. 1:2-6. 

10:50 Stewardship - Roy Gryder. We need to educate people that 
our association is a church, not a meeting and that what 
we are doing is real and is worship. 

10:55 Resolutions - Betty Woods. Read resolution regarding 

Long Ridge Baptist Church transferring out of Stony Fork 
Assoc. 

11:05 Obituaries - Clerk. 



38 



11:10 Business Meeting - Moved to accept Long Ridge letter 
transferring out of Stony Fork Assoc. and joining Avery 
Assoc. Seconded and approved. 

Moved to accept all reports presented the last two days, 
seconded and approved. 

Officers for 1996-1997 

Moderator - Roy Kanupp 

Vice Moderator - Arvil Hardy 

Nominating Committee Chairman - Max West 

Clerk - Linda Mills 

Treasurer - Edith Gryder 

Sunday School - Ted Triplett 

Discipleship Training - Charles Craig 

Music - Pauline Eldreth 

Stewardship - Roy Gryder 

Home Missions - WMU 

State Missions - WMU 

Retirement Homes - Mamie Craig 

Foreign Missions - Eunice Luttrell 

Children's Homes - Charles Smith 

Resolutions - Betty Woods 

Outreach Evangelism Director - Ron Burgett 

Positions not filled: Evangelism, Cooperative Program, 
Vacation Bible School, Baptist Hospital, Christian Higher 
Education, Baptist Foundation, Temperance and Morals 
(Christian Action League). Max West moved to work on 
remainder of positions until Sept. Executive Committee and 
will vote then. This was seconded and approved. 

Old Business - Moved to accept the budget as presented 
yesterday, seconded and approved. 

11:30 Annual Message - John McCoury. Jeremiah 18:1-6, In God's 
Mold. As a church, we are either in God's mold or the 
world's mold. God want so shape us into a vessel that he 
can use in the world. Tradition has our churches in a mold 
we need to break. 

A positive mold in our churches should be one of prayer. 
God wants to use everyone in the church. Pray specifically 
for needs and individuals and let God take over instead of 
following traditions. Have a vision for your church and 
remember no vision is too big for God and He will make it 
fit right in with the congregation. God still has people He 
can send out to help others as He did in the early church, 
so His word will flow out into all the world. 

Another mold we need to be in is studying His Holy Word. 
Satan does not want us to read it. Also, we need to study 
our Sunday School and Discipleship Training lessons. We 
will find joy and excitement in our churches if we let God's 



39 



Grace move in. How long has it been since you saw John 3 16 
in action? How long has it been since you reached out your 
hand to someone in need. We need to seek a closer 
relationship with Jesus. What are we say and communicating 
to our neighbors about the church? Are ^^^Y .^^fl^'l'll''^ 
saves-' This is still our basic message, as in the early 
chlTcL God has given us a plan that will work - salvation, 
just as effective today as it was 2000 years ago. 



12:20 Adjourn - Lunch 



40 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



Vc«r ClUirchM 


Moderator 


CitrtL 


Preacher 


1163 2ie<n Cdic MaeiMt 








HeuM.WiUct Ca. 


Larkin Hadft* 


Larkin Pip«t 


Elder Larkin Hodgi 


It63 VcllewHUI 


Ljrkm Hed|tt 


Larkin Pipes 


Wilson Bradshaw 


ItM Mmum were not prMied, numncrtpi |ei iMi. 






iloS Ml. tpOfum 


LJfkin noofti 


I. R. Hodges 


loseph Harrison 


lleo >owtn rofh 




Eliiah Trivett 


Larkin Hodeei 


lie/ W4iAy$4 


1 aa^AM UdU4a«A 

L*fkin rvuu^ii 


lamet ParMnt 


1 ft f arlian 


• AO ■ 1 ^ . — 

llM UANMI 


■ adk 1 inrt 


|amn Paraom 


Ijmn Piruinft 


iaA.ll * - — bA«L, 


1 a#kMt HfWiWB 


|ane% Panont 


W H Phillim 


!• / U Uifl r KSO 


1 ArkaA MnflMaR. 


lames Parsons 


William Wilcox 


lo / * CIS 




lames Parsons 


ijmM Pjr&oni 




1 arktfl hA^^mmm. 


lames Parsons 


1 . R . Carlion 


1X71 WaiAuu 


^jrkin Hod|CS 


lames Parsons 


Larkin Hodg's 


11174 y»llaw Hill 


Ljrkin Mod— ^ 


William E. Greene 


lames Parsons 


tt7$ Laurffl Fork 


L^kin HodM& 


William C. Greeiw 


Levi Wilson 


117fi ^lAAv Fork 




William C. Greene 


Larkin Hodges 


IS 77 ^Aolar 




Eliiah Triveit 


lames Parsons 


1171 OM FmM 


larkin HimIbm 


W ilium E. Greene 


1 . R. Carlton 


1879 Elk 




William E. Greene 


Monroe Crags 


1X80 Mt Vernon 


Lifkin Hodfci 


William E. Greene 


Monroe Gragg 


ISSI Watjuu 


Lirkift HoOfgi 


Eliiah Triveti 


Levi Wilson 


11X7 Ml. Eahrum 


j. F. Ellcr 


|ohn R. Hodsts 


lames Parsons 


1>83 Y -llaw Hill 


|. F. £ikr 


Eliiah Trivett 


Larkin Hodges 


ttl4 B<H»M Fork 


t jrkin H^ftM 


Thomas Pipes 


Larkin Pipes 


1»S Bul(jlaCo»e 


|. F, £||cf 


Thomas Pipes 


|. F. Eller 


1116 Sionv Fork 


E. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


E. M. Graa 


1887 Uniofi 


E. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


David Eller 


1188 L^rcl Fork 

■ w www I d ■ V io 




Wm. M. Let 


Wm. M. Lee 


1889 Popljr O'ovc 


F. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


|ohn F. Eller 


1890- Ml. Vtmofi 


£ M Graes 


Wm. M. Lee 


E. M. Grass 


189 V Waiauu 


E. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1897 Mt Firan 


E. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


E. M. Grass 


1893 Boonn Fork 


E. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


S. T. CarreH 


1894 Yellow Hill 


E. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


|ohn F. Eller 


I89S New River 


E. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


Geo. W. Trtyeii 


1896 Elk 


E. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1897 Laurel Fork 


E. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1898 Buffalo Co3e 


).C. Miller 


Wm. M. Lee 


|. F. Oavis 


1899 Mt. Vernon 


E. M. Grass 


R. H. Pipes 


|. 1. 1. Sherwood 


1900 Wauu|j 


E. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


0. C. Harman 


1901 Stony Fork 


I.e. Milter 


Wm. M. Lee 


|ohn Crisp 


1902 Poplar Grove 


|. C. Miller 


A. |. ShuU 


I.e. Blaykock 


1903 Booncs Fork 


F. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1904 Mt. Ephriam 


F. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


F. M. Grass 


190S Mt. faran 


E. M. Grass 


Wm. M. Lee 


wm. M. L«c 


1906 Yellow Hill 


Thai. L. Oav 


Wm. M. Lee 


Au Brown 


1907 New River 


That. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


|. F. OavH 


1908 Middle Cme 


tamet F . Church 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1909 Elk 


That. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


I.e. Miller 


1910 Laurel Fork 


Thet. L. Oav 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lte 


1911 Mt. Vcriton 


Thot. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


0. M. Wheeter 


1912 Poplar Grove 


Thot. L. Oay 


Wm. M. Lee 


R. F. Wilcox 


1913 Waiaufa 


Thoi. L. Oay 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1914 Mt. Eptriam 


Thm L Daw 


Wm. M. Ltc 


Wm. M. Lee 


1915 BoofiM Fork. 




Wm. M. Lee 


0. M. Wheeler 


1916 Rock Soring! 


B. F. Wilcox 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1917 Ml. Paran 


B. F . WilcoA 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1918 Otic to the outbreak 01 


inlluen/a no Attocution was held. 






1919 Yellow Hill 


B. F.WiUoa 


N. S. Hampton 


B. F. Wilcox 


1920 Mt. Vernon 


B. F. Wilcoa 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1921 Laurel Fork 


B. F. Wilcoa 


N. S. Hampton 


0. M. Wheeler 


1922 Watauca 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampion 


Oscar Ocllingcr 


1923 Poplar G'uve 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampion 


N. S. Hampton 


1924 Boonethork 


B. F. Wilcox 


|. Amos Hampton 


W. 0. Ashley 


1925 Mi.Ephrijm 


B. K. Wilcox 


|. Amos Hampton 


|. A. Hampton 


1926 Rock View 


O.M. Wheeler 


|. Amos Hampton 


G. M. Watson 



1927 Elk 


0. M. Wheeler 


R. F. Wikox 


A. C. Hamby 


1938 Waiaufa 


0. M. Wheeler 


B. F. WUcax 


B. F. Wilcox 


1929 Sandy fUi 


0. M. Wheeler 


8. F.Wikoi 


C. M. Watson 


1930 MidditCanc 


W. 0. Ashley 


B.F.Wilcox 


Lirmcy Bamtt 


1931 taurti Fork 


W. 0. Ashley 


B. F. Wikox 


B. F. Wilcox . 


1932 N«w Mopew«ll 


C. M. Watson 


B.F. Wilcox 


I.T.McGuirc ' 


1933 YailowHill 


B. F. WileoK 


Roy Keiltr 


C. M. Watson 


1934 Mt. Vcmon 


C. W. Grau 


Roy Kdlcr 


R. H. Shore 


I93S Grandmother Cap 


C. W.Crau 


Roy Keller 


W. I. Cook 


1936 Mt. Epnriam 


C. W.Crau 


Roy Keller 


Carl Triplett 


1937 Mt. View 


8. F. Wilcoji 


C. M. Watson 


Raymond Hendrix 


193S Watauta 


Carl Triplet! 


F. L. Hamoten 


W. 0. Ashley 


1939 Laurel Fork 


Carl Triplet! 


F. L. Hampton 


W. I.Cook 


1940 Bailey Camp 


Carl Tripieit 


F. L. Hampton 


C. M. Watson 


1941 Sandy Flat 


Lee (.Church 


N.UHarrisan 


Roy Keller 


1942 New Hopewell 


Lee ). Church 


N.L. Harrison 


B.F. Wilcox 


1943 Boones Fork 


Lc« 1. Church 


N. L. Hamion 


W. B. Bryant 


1944 Watauga 


N. L. Harrison 


W. M. Brown 


Frank Knight 


194S Laylown 


N. L. Harrison 


W. M. Brown 


W. D. Ashley 


1946 Mt. Vernon 


G. M. Watson 


W. M. Brown 


W. D. Ashley 


1947 Yellow Hill 


Thco HcndrU 


G. M. Waoon 


Roscoc Greene 


1948 No Minutes. ManuKript lost at printers. Held with Doe Rid|e Church. 




1949 Mt. Paran 


Thco Hendrix 


C. M. Watson 


Roscoe Grccrtc 


1950 Rock Sprinp 


Thco Hendrix 


N. L. Harrison 


R. L. Barties 


19S1 New Hopewell 


Theo Hendrix 


N.L.HarTiion 


Barrtcy Oliver 


19S2 Boones Fork 


C.M.Watson 


I.McrriU Coffey 


W. J.Cook 


19S3 East Flats 


Thco Hendrix 


G. M. Waoon 


R.L. Barnes 


19S4 Mt. Ephriam 


Thco Hendrix 


G. M. Waoon 


Lloyd I.Oullcr 


19SS Bailey Camp 


Thco Hertdrix 


G. M. Watson 


W.I.Cook 


I9S6 Laurel Fork 


Thco Hendrix 


I.Mcrriit Coffey 


W. M. BcBwn 


I9S7 Mt. Vernon and 








Sandy Flat 


Theo Hendrix 


J.Mcrritt Coffey 


W. I.Cook 


1958 Lay town and 








Rock Sprinp 


Theo Hendrix 


|. Merrin Coffey 


Canon Eggers 


1959 New Hopewell and 








Lon( Ridtc 


Carson Eggers 


|. Merrin Cotfey 


W. |. Cook 


1960 Mt. Paran and 








Boones Fork 


Carson Eggers 


|. Merritt Coffey 


Wendell Crnchcr 


1961 Watauga and 








Yellow Hill 


Carson Eggers 


|. Merritt Coffey 


Duprec Cowan 


1962 Mt. Ephriam and 








Sandy Flat 


Carson Eggers 


Mits Winifred Hampton 


Roby McNca 


1963 Doe Ridge and 








Rock Sprinp 


Canon Eggers 


Miu Winifred Hampton 


W. M. Brown 


1964 Bailey's Camp 


E.O. Bustle 


Mrs. Oart Storic 


Wm. Quinn 


Boones Fork 


E. O. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storic 




1965 Laurel Fork 


E. O. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


W. M. Brown 


Lay (own 


E. O. Bustle 


Mrs. CUrk Storic 




1966 Longridgc 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Storie 


Phillip Martin 


Ml. Paran 


A. C Moody 


Mrs. Clark Storic 


Lyie (Peu) Vannoy 


1967 Ml. Vernon 


Archie ClawMin 


Mrs. Clark Storic 


Basil Tester 


New Hopewell 


Archie Clawson 


Mrv Clark Storic 


E. 0. Bustle 


1968 Rock Sprinp 


A. C. Moody 


Mrs. Dark Storic 


A. C. Moody 


Sandy Flat 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Oark Storic 


Rayrter Matheson 


1969 BailevsCamp 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs. Dark Storic 


Lewis Hedge 


Boones Fork 


Lewis Hodge 


Mrs. CUrk Storic 


Hcrrinf Crisp 


1970 Laurel Fork 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Max West 


David Austin 


Doe Ridge 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Max West 


Archie Clawson 


1971 Laytown 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Raymond Turbyfill 


Longridge 


David Austin 


Mrs. Max West 


Shcrnll Welbom 


1972 Mt. Ephriam 


David Austin 


Mrs. Mm West 


Gumcy Robbms 


Mount fuin 


David Austin 


Mrt.M«xWcw 


A. C Moody 


1973 Mt. Vernon 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs.MaxWcst 


Evcfcttc Watson 


New Hopewell 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrv Max West 


Sherriil Welbom 


1974 Rock Sprinp 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Merle (ehrtson 


Sandy Flat 


Marvin Saunders 


Mrs. Max West 


Dale Milsicad 


I97S Yellow Hill 


Mertc lohnion 


Mrs. Max West 


Dean Hodges 


Bailey's Camp 


Merle lohnton 


Mrs. Max West 


Max West 


1976 Boones Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


A. C Moody 


Doe Ridge 






UoydHolmao 


1977 Laurel Fork 


Charles Craig 


. Barbara Wcu 


Raymond Hendrix 


Laytown 


Charles Craig 


BafbafaWcu 


Man Wast 



42 



1978 Long Ridge 
Mt. Ephraim 

1979 Mount Vernon 
Boone Fork 

1980 Mt. Par on 
New Hopewell 

1981 Rock Spring 
Sandy Flat 

1982 Watauga 
Bailey Camp 

1983 Boone Fork 
Doe Ridge 

1984 Laurel Fork 
Laytown 

1985 Long Ridge 
Mt. Ephraim 

1986 Rock Spring 
Sandy Flat 

1987 Bailey's Camp 
Boone Fork 

1988 Doe Ridge 
Laytown 

1989 Long Ridge 
Mt. Ephraim 

1990 Rock Spring 
Sandy Flat 

1991 Bailey's Camp 
Boone Fork 

1992 Doe Ridge 
Laytown 

1993 Long Ridge 
Mt. Ephraim 

1994 Rock Spring 
Sandy Flat 

1995 Bailey's Camp 
Doe Ridge 

1996 Laytown 
Long Ridge 



Charles Craig 
Charles Craig 
Max West 
Max West 
Max West 
Max West 
Max West 
Max West 
Max West 
Max West 
Jack White 
Jack. White 
Jack White 
Jack White 
J.R. Robbins 
J.R. Robbins 
J.R. Robbins 
J.R. Robbins 
J.R. Robbins 
J.R. Robbins 
Scott Church 
Scott Church 
Scott Church 
Scott Church 
George Berry 
George Berry 
George Berry 
George Berry 
George Berry 
George Berry 
Max West 
Max West 
Max West 
Max West 
Ron Burgett 
Ron Burgett 
Ron Burgett 
Ron Burgett 



Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Barbara West 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 

Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 



Philip Martin 

A.C. Moody 

Harold Bean 

Harold Danner 

Jim Lambert 

Burl Jones 

Cannon Ward 

Jim Lambert 

Jack White 

Cecil Gragg 

Burl Jones 

J.R. Robbins 

Jack White 

Ed Greene 

Scott Church 

Ed Greene 

Scott Church 
Max West 
Greg Mathis 
Everette Little 
Kenneth Ridings 
Carter Moretz 
Alex Booth 
Carter Moretz 
Scott Church 
Max West 
Jimmy Hubbard 
Eugene Fillers 
Arville Hardy 
Dennis Geouge 
John McCoury 
Sherrill Dunn 
Richard Baird 
Leon Silver 
Max West 
Arvil Hardy 

Danny Murphy 
John McCoury 



The churches, Buffalo Cove, Cool Springs, Wilkes County Elk, Stony Fork, and Yellow 
Hill, formerly belonging to other associations. 

Met at the Stony Fork Baptist Church and organized the ^^^^^^f^^XJct^^^^^ 

on November 9th. and 10th., 1880. For this meeting appointed Elder Larkin Hodges, 

Moderator and Brother Elijah Trivette, Clerk. 



43 



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PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


OIQEST OF LETTEHS 

IMPORTANT Thte labi* it lor use by the clerk In any 
way helpful. II la not to ba sent to the stale convention 
ofllca or Southern Baptist Convention oflice. 




NAME OF CHURCH 


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STONY FORK 
MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 
1997 ANNUAL 



1997 MINUTES OF THE 
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL 

MEETING 
OF 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 
MT. EPHRAIM, AUGUST 8, 1997 
AND 

ROCK SPRING, AUGUST 9, 1997 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Associational Leaders 1 

Suggested Order of Business 3 

Constitution and Bylaws 4 

Financial Report 14 

Vacation Bible School 16 

International Missions 17 

North American Missions 19 

State Missions 21 

Children's Homes 22 

Retirement Homes 24 

Baptist Hospital 25 

Christian Higher Education 27 

Baptist Foundation 28 

Biblical Recorder 29 

Discipleship Training 30 

Women on Mission 31 

Christian Action League 32 

Obituaries/Resolutions 33 

Budget 34 

Director of Missions Report 35 

Proceedings 38 



History/Historical Table/Tables/Map 



SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION 
ASSOCIATIONAL LEADERS - 1997 



STATC CONVE^mON 

North Carolina 



ASS0CUT10N 

Stony Fork. 



MAIUNG ADDRESS 



CITY, ST, ZIP+4 



PHONE 



FAX 



PIUM provide ttw upcoming nam* (naw ctiurch yaai), 
mailvtg address, and tetepnone number of trie following 
posibons m your association If tfie positioo(s) listed a ni 
the sxact titla used by your association, cfiange the titia i 
conform to the name of the position used by your 
assocumon. 



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Roy Gryder 



MAILING 
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972 Edmisten Rd. 



Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 



295 " 3410 



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Roy Kanupp 



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Lenoir. N.C. 28645 



NAME 



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ADDRESS 



CITY, ST, 
ZIP+4 



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Arvil Hardy 



1747 Summit Rd, 



Purlear, NC 28665 



NAME 



Linda Mills 



MAIUNG 
ADDRESS 



CITY, ST, 
ZIP+4 



PHONE 



159 Hollifield Rd. 



Blowing Rock, NC 28605 



704 -295 



- 7095 



NAME 



Edith Gryder 



MAILING 
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CITY, ST, 
ZIP+4 



PHONE 



972 Edmisten Rd. 



Blowing Rock, NC 28605 



704- 295 



-3410 



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Charles Craig 



MAIUNG 
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MAILING 
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1645 Shulls Mill Rd. 



Boone, N.C. 28607 



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Pauline Eldreth 



MAIUNG 
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CITY, ST 
2IP+4 



PHONE 



567 Grand Blvd. 



Boone, NC 28607 



704 - 264 



- 2532 



CITY, ST 
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PHONE 



Blowing Rock, N.C. 28605 



704 



_ 295 



-7095 



Opening 

Date 
8-7-98 



NEXT 
ANNUAL 
MEETING 



Location (Churches or Places) 

Sandy Flat 
. 'Bailey's Camp 



Closing 
Date 
8-8-98 



Time of Opening Session 

Morning ^3 Afternoon C3 Evening 



Time of Closing Session 

^9 Morning C3 Afternoon 



Evening 



Continued on Back 



SUGGESTED C3RDER OF BUSINESS FOR 1998 
ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY SEVENTH 

ANNUM. MEETING OP STONY FORK 
MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

FKEDAY MORNING, AUGUST 7, 1998 
SANDY FLAT 

8:30 Call to order 

8:35 Song 

8:40 Devotion 

8:50 Adoption of Program 

9:00 Roll Call 

9:05 Recognition of New Pastors and Workers 

9:10 Vacation Bible School 

9:15 Foreign Missions 

9:25 Sunday School 

9:30 Cooperative Program 

9:40 Evangelism 

9:50 Finance Report - Budget 

10:00 Break 

10:10 Home Missions 

10:25 State Missions 

10:40 Children's Homes 

10:55 Retirement Homes 

11:10 Baptist Hospital 

11:25 Christian Higher Education 

11:40 Baptist Foundation 

11:55 Stewardship 

12:10 Annual Message 

1:00 Adjourn - Lunch 

SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 8 , 1998 
BAILEY 'S CAMP 

8:30 Call to Order 

8:35 Song 

8:40 Devotion 

8:50 Roll Call of Churches 

8:55 Biblical Recorder 

9:05 Discipleship Training 

9:15 Women on Mission 

9:25 Temperance and Morals - Christian Action League 

9:50 General Board Report 

9:55 Stewardship Report 

10:00 Break 

10:10 Resolutions 

10:15 Obituaries 

10:20 Business Meeting - Election of Officers - Approve Budget 

11:00 Annual Message 

12:00 Adjourn - Lunch 



3 



CONSTITUTION 



OF THE STONY FORK MISSIONARY BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 

PREAMBLE 

For the declaration of its fundamental purposes and the 
permanent guidance and control of its activities, the body does 
adopt the following as its constitution, to wit: 

ARTICLE I - Name and Membership 

SECTION 1. This body shall be known as the Stony Fork 
Missionary Baptist Association of North Carolina. 

SECTION 2 . The association is composed of Missionary Baptist 
Churches. 

SECTION 3. Any Baptist church may be admitted into this 
Association upon recommendation of the Committee of Petitionary 
Letters and Constitution of the Churches Committee and the majority 
vote of members present at any meeting as prescribed in Article IX. 

SECTION 4. Any church, at her discretion, may withdraw from 
this body. 

SECTION 5. This association may, at any meeting, after an 
investigation and report of a duly authorized committee of the 
Association, by a majority vote, declare a dissolution of union 
with any church deemed corrupt, either in doctrine or practice. 

SECTION 6. Each church shall elect its messengers to the 
annual associational meeting. Each messenger must be certified in 
the annual church letter to the Association and must be appointed 
on the following ration: five messengers, in addition to the 
pastor, for each church having a membership not exceeding fifty, 
and one additional messenger for each increase of fifty. In no 
case shall the total number of messengers exceed ten for any given 
church, in addition to the pastor. 

SECTION 7. When any church shall fail to be represented by 
letter or messenger for two consecutive years, the Missions 
Committee shall confer with the church, and if satisfactory reason 
is not given, and there is no evidence that said church wishes to 
keep alive their affiliation with the Association, the committee 
shall bring its findings to the next Executive Committee meeting, 
and the Association shall, at that time, by a majority of present 
members, vote to withdraw fellowship. The Association recognizes 
the right of any affiliated church to withdraw its fellowship from 
the Association. 

SECTION 8. The Annual Associational meeting shall convene on 
Friday at 8:30 a.m. and adjourn at 1:00 p.m. (lunch to follow). It 
shall reconvene at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday and adjourn at the 
completion of business for the noon meal. This following the first 
Sunday in August. 

ARTICLE II — Purpose 

SECTION 1. The prime purpose of the Association shall be to 
counsel together for the enlargement and strengthening of God's 



4 



kingdom and to promote unity and growth among the churches 
composing it. 

SECTION 2. It shall be the purpose of this Association to 
enlist all of the churches into full cooperation with the North 
Carolina Baptist State Convention and the Southern Baptist 
Convention and their agencies in the work of missions, evangelism, 
christian education and social service. 

ARTICLE III - Powers and Prerogatives 

SECTION 1. The Association, when convened in meeting, shall 
sit as an advisory council and shall have no power to infringe on 
any of the internal rights and affairs of the member churches. It 
may advise, however, with the member churches and recommend 
measures of usefulness for their adoption or rejection. 

SECTION 2 . When grievances occur between any members or 
minority group of any church which is a member of the Association, 
The Association, the Executive Committee, or Missions Committee, or 
the committee designated by and acting for either of these bodies, 
may advise or give aid in matters which do not infringe on the 
rights of the local church, an this only on the invitation of the 
individual or group involved. 

SECTION 3. Any church found unfaithful to the faith and 
practices common to the Association, as outlined in Addendum I - 
ARTICLES OF FAITH (the Baptist Faith and Message as adopted by the 
Southern Baptist Convention in 1963) shall be encouraged to correct 
such errors. If the conduct of said church is not corrected and is 
of such nature as to alienate said church from the orderly and 
faithful churches of the association, the Executive Committee of 
the Association can recommend that fellowship be withdrawn from 
said church, and upon a majority vote of the messengers in the 
annual session, fellowship of said church can be withdrawn. (See 
Article 1, Section 7). 

ARTICLE IV - The Executive Committee 

SECTION 1. The Association shall have an Executive Committee 
to serve as the Association between annual meetings, assisting in 
the overall work of the Association with such limitations as may be 
imposed by the constitution. 

SECTION 2. The Executive Committee shall be composed of the 
associational officers and the pastors, and the chairman of 
deacons, along with two elected lay persons from each church. 
Sixteen members shall constitute a quorum. The names of these 
persons shall be furnished annually to the associational clerk, if 
changes occur during the associational year, these changes shall be 
forwarded to the clerk. 

SECTION 3. At the beginning of each Executive Committee 
meeting, a roll call will be taken of each church and its 
representatives . 

SECTION 4. The Executive Committee shall meet within two 
weeks after the Annual Association Meeting, the second Sunday of 
November, March, and July. These meetings shall be held in 
churches of the Association, consecutively in alphabetical order. 



5 



ARTICLE V - Officers 



SECTION 1. The officers of this body shall be: Moderator, 
Vice-Moderator, Clerk, Treasurer, Sunday School Director, Church 
Training Director, Brotherhood Director, WMU Director, Vacation 
Bible School Director, Music Director, Pianist, and Evangelism 
Director. 

SECTION 2. The officers of the Association shall be elected 
at each regular Annual Associational Meeting. The Nominating 
Committee shall fill vacancies that may occur in the respective 
categories between annual meetings of the Association by bringing 
names to the Executive Committee for their approval 

SECTION 3. By the virtue of the office, the Associational 
Director of Missions is considered an ex-officio member of all 
associational committees. For all qualifications and terms of 
office, see Article VII, Section 1. 

ARTICLE VI - Duties of Officers 

SECTION 1. It shall be the duty of the Moderator of the 
Association to preside over the annual sessions, and at the 
quarterly meetings of the Executive Committee. As the presiding 
officer, he shall open the meetings punctually at the appointed 
time, enforce the rules, preserve order, and exercise all the 
prerogatives f a presiding officer, according to the principles of 
established parliamentary usage. He shall provide leadership for 
a progressive ideal throughout the Association. He shall be 
elected for a one year term, and he shall not succeed himself for 
a maximum of two full terms. He shall appoint in advance any other 
committees he may deem necessary or advisable. Each of these 
committees shall report at the annual meeting for which they are 
appointed. It shall be the responsibility of the Moderator to call 
any needed meetings at any time he deems necessary. The moderator 
is considered an ex-officio member of all committees. 

SECTION 2. It shall be the duty of the Vice-Moderator to 
discharge the duties of the Moderator in his absence or at his 
request . 

SECTION 3. It shall be the duty of the clerk to keep an 
accurate record of the proceedings of the Association in regular 
and special sessions; to keep accurate records of quarterly 
meetings of the Executive Committee; to keep on file the printed 
minutes and other important documents belonging to the Association; 
to furnish the churches with blank letter forms on which to make 
the annual reports to the Association; to superintend the printing 
of the minutes, and to distribute them to the churches as soon 
after adjournment as possible. For this service, the clerk shall 
be paid annually an amount recommended by the Finance Committee and 
approved by the Association. 

SECTION 4. It shall be the duty of the treasurer to receive 
all funds of the Association and to disburse the same in accordance 
with the budget of the Association or for the purposes for which 
the funds were contributed, to render to the Association an 
itemized report of the receipts and disbursements at the first 
session of the annual meeting. In the treasurer's absence, a 



6 



member of the Finance Committee shall give the report. The 
treasurer shall make available through the associational newsletter 
a guarterly report including the contributions of each church in 
the Association. A guarterly report shall be made available at the 
guarterly meetings of the Executive Committee. For this service, 
the treasurer shall be paid annually an amount recommended by the 
Finance Committee and approved by the Association. 

SECTION 5. The Sunday School Director shall take the 
initiative in promoting inspirational meetings, study courses, and 
leadership classes for the churches of the Association. He shall 
work in cooperation with the denominational Sunday School agencies 
in promoting the denominational programs; and he will be 
responsible for coordinating and promoting Vacation Bible School 
work in conjunction with the Vacation Bible School Director. He 
shall also work with the Nominating Committee in enlisting 
leadership for his organization. 

SECTION 6. The Discipleship Training Director shall take the 
initiative in promoting the regular meetings projected by the State 
Convention and be available to the churches for help in 
strengthening the established unions and encourage the organization 
of new unions in churches without them. He shall also work with 
the Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his 
organization . 

SECTION 7. The Brotherhood Director shall be responsible for 
promoting missionary education within the Association and be 
available to the churches to assist in strengthening organizations 
and programs of existing units. He shall also work with the 
Nominating Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

SECTION 8. The WMU Director shall be responsible for 
promoting missionary education within the Association and shall be 
available to the churches to assist in promoting and establishing 
new Baptist Women and Baptist Women auxiliary units, and shall 
assist in strengthening the organizations and programs of existing 
units. She shall also work with the Nominating Committee in 
enlisting leadership for her organization. 

SECTION 9. The Vacation Bible School Director shall work in 
conjunction with the Sunday School Director in enlisting and 
training workers, planning and organizing for the annual Vacation 
Bible School Clinic. 

SECTION 10. The Music Director shall take the initiative in 
promoting the meetings and activities suggested by the State Music 
Leadership and be available to the churches to help in 
strengthening their music programs. The Music Director will be 
responsible for the music at the associational and Executive 
Committee meetings. He shall also work with the Nominating 
Committee in enlisting leadership for his organization. 

SECTION 11. The Pianist will be responsible for playing the 
piano at all associational and Executive Committee meetings. 

SECTION 12. The Evangelism Chairman will work with the 
Evangelism program in planning, promoting, and coordinating all 
evangelistic activities for the Association in conjunction with the 
Director of Missions. 



7 



ARTICLE VIII - Director of Missions 



Statement of Purpose and Position Title: 

The office or position will be known as the Director of 
Missions for the Stony Fork Missionary Baptist Association. The 
Director of Minions shall provide responsible leadership in the 
work of the Association through performing such basic functions as 
the planning, correlation, and implementation of programs, program 
services, and ministries of the Association; counsel the churches; 
agencies of needs, problems, and potentialities, with the 
Association; and interpret to the churches the program resources and 
other assistance available for the Baptist State Convention and 
Southern Baptist Convention agencies. 

SECTION 1. RESPONSIBILITIES 

A. Planning and coordination 

1. Lead the Association in strategy planning; 
establishing and maintaining a long-range program. Lead the 
Association to set goals and encourage the churches to work toward 
them. 

2. Coordinate the associational work and meetings by 
serving as ex-officio member of all committees. 

3 . Work with program officers and the Nominating 
Committee in selecting and enlisting leaders for organizations and 
committees of the Association. 

4. Counsel, encourage, and lead in training the 
associational officers. 

B. Education and Promotion 

1 . Seek to assist the pastors and the churches in 
programs suitable for their growth and development, recognizing the 
differences in size and diversity of membership, utilizing 
persuasion to promote fellowship and cooperation. 

2. Seek out in cooperation with the Missions Committee, 
places of mission needs and seek to enlist and appropriate churches 
t meet these needs. In the event no church(es) can been listed, 
upon the instructions of the Missions Committee, the Director of 
Missions may lead in such a program in the name of Stony Fork 
Baptist Association. 

3. Promote church organizational programs: Sunday 
School, Discipleship Training, Church Music, Brotherhood, WMU, and 
Vacation Bible School and Leadership Training. 

4. Promote church assistance programs: Evangelism, 
Stewardship and Family Life. 

5. Plan for and promote simultaneous efforts, such as: 
World Missions Conference, revival crusades, enlargement campaigns, 
training school, etc. 

6 . Prepare in cooperation with the Missions Committee an 
annual associational calendar. Prepare a monthly associational 
newsletter for distribution in the Association. 

7 . Attend denominations meetings and conferences as 
budget and time considerations permit. 

8 . Report to the Executive Board at its regular meetings 
and to the Association in annual session. 



8 



C. Service Ministry 

1. Provide counsel and help as requested by pastors and 

churches . 

2. Serve as pulpit supply, assist in church surveys, and 
conduct studies and revivals as requested in keeping with terms of 
employment, if he is an ordained minister. Pulpit supply for a 
period of 4 weeks. 

3. Manage the associational office, supervise 
associational employees , and maintain equipment of the Association. 

4. Cooperate with the Finance Committee in planning the 
budget and promoting giving to the Association. 

5. Establish and announce office hours to best utilize 
the division of time between the associational office and field 
responsibilities . 

6. Always working through the pastors, the Director of 
Missions will be available to offer aid to churches in need of 
assistance. No program will be conducted for a church without the 
invitation of the pastor and/or church. In the event the church is 
without a pastor, the Director of Missions will respond to request 
from the church leadership. 

SECTION 2 . Terms of Employment 

A. Term of Office - the Director of Missions shall be 
called for an indefinite term of service. 

B. Remuneration - will be recommended by the Missions 
and Finance Committees and approved by the Association. 

C. Honorariums - will be received for pulpit supply, 
weddings, funerals, revivals, and pastoral service, not directly 
related to his normal responsibilities; shall be considered 
personal remuneration. 

D. Work Schedule - schedules will vary, with weekends 
normally being kept for services in churches in the Association. 

E. Work Accountability - The Missions Committee pledges 
itself to a ministry of loyalty, support, and loving encouragement 
to the Director of Missions, so that under the leadership of the 
Spirit of God, he may render the most effective service possible. 

F. Both parties must give a thirty day notice before 
termination. 

SECTION 3. Qualifications 

A. Spiritual - a committed Christian with an sense of 
definite call to mission service. 

B. Educational - Preferably college and seminary 
degrees, or their equivalent. 

C. Special Knowledge and Skills - Knowledge of Baptist 
denominational life and willingness to continue to learn; vision, 
flexibility, and demonstrated leadership, ability in planning, 
conducting, and evaluating the work of the Association. 

D. Character - Christian integrity. 

E. Experience - Pastoral ministry preferred. Christian 
education or associational and other mission experience are 
necessary. Preferably the associational experience should be as a 
Director of Missions, associational staff member, or as an active 
and responsible officer in the Association. The mission experience 
may be in the establishment of and involvement in mission outreach 
and ministry in a mission, church or association. 



9 



ARTICLE III - Committees and Their Duties 

SECTION 1. The committee of Time, Place and Preacher shall be 
composed of three members. It shall be the duty of the committee 
to recommend to the Association, the churches where the next 
session will be held, preferably to be taken in alphabetical order, 
and also the preacher for the annual session. In order to 
alleviate any hardship on any one church hosting the associational 
meeting, it is suggested that two churches may jointly host each 
meeting. Expenses, meeting places, and other arrangements will be 
coordinated by the churches selected. 

SECTION 2. The Committee on Resolutions shall be composed of 
two members. It shall be the duty of this committee to draw and 
present to the Association suitable resolutions of appreciation and 
expressions of sentiments on any matter chosen by the committee or 
as directed by the messengers of the Association. 

SECTION 3. The Program Committee shall be composed of the 
general officers of the Association. It shall be the duty of this 
committee to prepare and present a suggested order of business to 
be adopted by the Association. When adopted, the program becomes 
the order of business unless changed by common consent or by the 
vote of the body. 

SECTION 4. The Committee of Nominations shall be composed of 
five members (pastors of each church) . It shall be the duty of the 
committee to prepare for the Association the names of individuals 
as nominees for the following officers and reports: Moderator, 
Vice-Moderator, Treasurer, Clerk, Sunday School Director, 
Discipleship Training Director, Music Director, Vacation Bible 
School Director, Brotherhood Director, Pianist, Evangelism 
Director, and Associational State Representatives, also persons for 
the following reports shall also be selected: Home Missions, State 
Missions, Foreign Missions, Stewardship, Cooperative Program, 
Obituaries, Temperance and Morals, VBS, WMU, Sunday School, and any 
others designated by the Association. Representatives for the 
following shall be selected: N.C. Baptist Hospital, N.C. 
Children's Homes, Baptist Home for the Aging, Denominational 
Colleges (Christian Higher Education), Denominational Literature, 
Annuity Board, Baptist Foundation, and any others designated by the 
Association. The Committee on Nominations shall be responsible for 
selecting and contacting each of these persons for their approval 
before the annual meeting. The floor shall be open for nominations 
for these officers on the day of the annual meeting. Nominations 
from the floor shall be taken first, then the Chairperson of the 
Nominating Committee shall give the nomination of the committee. 
All nominees bust be contacted before and permission given for 
acceptance of nomination. The WMU will elect their officers. 

SECTION 5. The Finance Committee shall be composed of five 
members, one of which will include the Treasurer of the 
Association. It shall be the duty of this committee to prepare and 
recommend a budget for the Association and to suggest ways and 
means whereby the budget can be raised by the local churches and to 
secure the cooperation of the churches in raising the budget. The 
Finance Committee will present the proposed budget on the first day 
of the annual meeting with discussion and adoption scheduled for 



10 



the second day. The Finance Committee shall meet prior to the 
quarterly Executive Committee meeting and shall prepare a regular 
form acceptable to the Association, a detailed financial report 
which shall be given to each member present at the quarterly 
meeting and the annual meeting. 

SECTION 6. The Missions Committee shall be composed of fiver 
members (pastors of each church) and this committee shall report to 
and cooperate with the Executive Committee of the Association. The 
duties of this committee are: (a) coordinate and help promote 
through the organizations and committees all phases and activities 
of the associational programs, (b) cooperate with the local 
churches in making surveys of areas which, in the opinion of the 
Missions Committee, are not being adequately served by the local 
missionary Baptist work, and to promote and develop these new 
phases of the missions programs, (c) serve in advisory capacity to 
the Director of Missions in all matters pertaining to his work and 
to serve with him in directing and promoting the missions programs 
of the Association, (d) provide information and assistance to the 
departments of State Missions of the N.C. Baptist Convention in 
meeting local missionary needs, such as missionary pastor's 
assistance, promoting mission causes, etc., (e) meet prior to the 
Executive Committee or at any time necessary to discharge its 
duties, (f) shall have the following responsibilities relating to 
the office of Director of Missions: 

1. Serve as a search committee for a Director of Missions. 

2 . Recommend to the Executive Committee the name of the 
nominee . 

3 . Coordinate financial matters with the Baptist State 
Convention. 

4. Serve as a liaison between the churches and the Director 
of Missions. 

SECTION 7. The Constitution and By-Laws Committee shall be 
composed of the Missions Committee and one selected layperson of 
the Association, making six members. It shall be the duty of 
this committee to review and update the constitution and by-laws as 
it becomes necessary. This committee will recommend revisions and 
amendments concerning the constitution and by-laws to the 
Association as deemed necessary. They shall meet at least once a 
year before the annual meeting to review and discuss the 
constitution . 

SECTION 8. The Committee of Petitionary Letters and 
Constitutions of churches: 

ARTICLE IX - Petitionary letters and constitution of churches 

The Committee of Petitionary Letters and Constitutions of the 
Churches shall be made up of the Missions Committee members. 

SECTION 1. Any group of baptized believers in Christ desiring 
to organize themselves into a missionary Baptist church with the 
purpose of seeking the recognition of, and fellowship and cooperate 
with this Association, shall be required to fulfill the following 
requirements. They shall submit their request for admission to the 
Director of Missions or the Moderator, who will in turn forward it 
to the Committee of Petitionary Letters. In addition to the letter 



11 



of request, a church must also furnish a report of work 
accomplished since its organization, a copy of the church covenant, 
and its articles of faith. 

SECTION 2. Any church seeking admission into the fellowship 
of the Association must be under the watchcare of the Association 
for a period of one year before it can be admitted. During this 
interim period, the church shall be expected to have part in the 
support of the causes fostered by the Association, the N.C. State 
Convention and the Southern Baptist Convention. 

SECTION 3 . The findings f the Committee on Petitionary 
Letters shall be reported at the annual meeting or at the Executive 
Committee meeting with a recommendation either for or against 
admission. 

SECTION 4. If the church is accepted under the watchcare of 
the Association, the Committee on Petitionary Letters shall 
recommend at the end of the year that the church be accepted into 
full fellowship provided that examination of that years work done 
and a study of the cooperative spirit of that church proves to be 
in accordance to the principles of the churches of the Association. 
A two-thirds majority vote of the messengers or Executive Committee 
members present shall be needed for such an action to be completed. 
There will be an appropriate program conducted during the annual 
meeting to formally welcome this new church into the Association. 

SECTION 5. For a sister cooperative Missionary Baptist church 
that is affiliated with the Southern Baptist Convention, that 
wishes to join or transfer status, the same procedure is needful 
with the exception of the one year associational watchcare. Upon 
receipt of letter of request, the Committee of Petitions shall 
recommend its findings to the Executive Committee, and after a 
thirty day period of investigation, the discretion of the Executive 
Committee shall be used if immediate acceptance of fellowship is 
possible. If accepted, a program of welcoming shall be presented 
at the annual meeting. 

ARTICLE X - Amendments 

The constitution or any part of the constitution shall be 
amended at the annual meeting in August, with the acceptance by 
two-thirds majority vote. It is suggested that all changes and 
recommendations of amendments be submitted two months prior to the 
annual meeting, to the Constitution and By-Laws Committee for their 
careful consideration; however, any messenger has a right to submit 
proposed changes in accordance with this article 

BY-LAWS 

1. All associational meetings shall be opened and closed in 
prayer. 

2. "Roberts Rules of Order" shall be used as guidelines for 
parliamentary procedure in all meetings. The Moderator will be 
responsible for having a copy of same at all meetings and a copy of 
parliamentary procedures and the gavel of the Association shall be 
transferred upon succession of the moderator. 

3. All associational officers shall exercise authority over 



12 



their department and shall give a financial accounting to the 
Finance Committee for monies expended. 

4. Election and installation of officers shall take place on 
the last day of the annual meeting in August, and these officers 
shall be responsible for planning, coordinating, and providing 
leadership for the coming year in the Association. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION AND BT-LAWS 

Time, Place and Preacher Committee will be amended to the 
hosting church pastor or a preacher of his choice will be the 
preacher for the associational meetings. Committee membership will 
be filled according to the number of people participating in the 
associational work. 

Article VIII - Committees and their duties, Section 4 - 
amended to: recommendations from the Nominating Committee shall be 
presented first, then nominations will be taken from the floor. 



13 



I 



REPORTS 



Financial Report 
for 

STONY FORK BAPTIST ASSOCIATION 
Annual Meeting 
August 8,1997 



Balance August 1, 1996 $4143.33 
Contributions from churches for year: 



--Bailey's Camp 


$ 630 


.00 


($ 30 


min) 


--Doe Ridge 


387 


.00 


( 50 


■' ) 


--Lay town 


399 


.00 


( 84 


" ) 


--Mt. Ephriam 


125 


.00 


( 25 


■' ) 


--Rock Spring 


1936 


. 19 






--Sandy Flat 


1642 


.48 


( 100 


" ) 


Other: 










--Offerings for missions 


56 


. 83 






(Exec. Comm. meetings) 










--N.C. State Convention 


173 


.25 







Total Contributions: +5349. 75 

$ 9493.08 



Expenditures : 

--Annuity (G.B 
--Linda Mills (Clerk 
--Edith Gryder (Trea 
--Precision Printing 
--Fred Luncef ord ( "M 
--Dinner (S. S. Conf 
--Morris Hatten (WMU 
--WMU (Ridgecrest Tr 
--Geri Jones (Financ 
--Roy Gryder (D.O.M. 
--VBS materials 



erry ) 


$ 75, 


.00 


Honorarium) 


250. 


,00 


s . Honorarium ) 


250, 


.00 


(Minutes ) 


232. 


,45 


"night spk) 


150, 


.00 


. workers ) 


37. 


, 75 


Speaker ) 


50, 


.00 


ip) 


200. 


,00 


ial asst) 


554, 


.00 


expense ) 


275. 


,00 




63, 


. 99 



Total Expenditures: -2138 . 19 

Total in Treasure 8/1/97: $7354.89 



14 



Stony Fork Baptist Association 
Approved Budget 
for 
1996-1997 



Budget 



T^T T*0(^"f"oy /^"f MS Q ^ T oner • 


$3000 

«P \J \J \J 


00 


' $ 275 


00 


' ' $ 900 


00 


/innuiby lor i/xr. oi lixo- 




00 


1 1 >j . 


on 


' ' 




Clerk honorarium: 


250 


.00 


! 250. 


00 


! I 250 


.00 


Treasurer honorarium: 


250 


.00 


; 250. 


00 


! ! 250 


.00 


VBS • 


200 


. 00 


! 63 


99 


I ! 200 


. 00 


Discipleship Training: 


150 


.00 


! 150. 


00 


1 : 150 


.00 


Sunday School : 


200 


.00 


! 37. 


75 


! 1 100 


.00 


Evangelism : 


125 


.00 







i ; com- 200 


.00 


Evangelism Conference: 


200 


.00 


1 




! ! bined 




WMU: 


250 


.00 


: 250. 


00 


; ! 350 


.00 


Convention (2 persons): 


200 


.00 


! 




! ! 200 


.00 


Clerical : 


50 


.00 


! 




! ! 50 


.00 


Phone : 


75 


.00 


: 




1 ! 




Total: 


$5850 


.00 


!$1351. 


74 






Not budgeted: 














Minutes : 






! 232. 


45 


1 ! 250 


.00 


Benevolent fund: 






: 554. 


00 


! 1 1000 


.00 








!$2138. 


19 


; ; $3900 


.00 



Paid 



Proposed for 
1997-1998 



15 



v'Ala'! ion bible sLHUOL 

On March 15, 1997, A tearri a+ five attended the North Laroima 
Vacation Bible School Ci i n i c \ con-f er ence ) in Morqanton. There 
we became -familiar with the Baptist Sunday School Boarc 
Cur r 1 CLii Lim and also had an opportunity to aquaint ourselves 
witn other materials as well. Those attending this conference 
With me were Bartjara idlest, Linda Mills, Euknice Luttreil, ana 
Tracey Bol i c k . 

□ n ApriJ 27, 1997, we conducted our associ at i onal V'BS clinic 
at Laytown Baptist Church, Three churches were represented 
there. It is my understaridi ng that the si;-; churches in Stony 
Fork Association conducted VBS this summer. For this we give 
thar;k3^ til' God because I also understand that some had 
chill dr-en oi" youth to come to know the Lord — and a-fter all — 
L sn t that wr:at it 's all about? 

Ir you have not already done so, please -follow up on anyone 
you might have ^lad in your K'BS who is not in church tnat they 
may know they are wanted in yours. This could be a great 
oppD!' tur:i ty to help them come to Jesus and help your Sun □ ay 
Sc!-:i:jo1 to grow as well. 

It .Lsri t too early to star-;: praying and making plans -for ne;;t 
v e a r a n d p 1 e a s e I-.-: n o w that v our V' a c a 1 1 o n Bible School D i r e c t o 
will be qlad Lo nelp in any way l")e/ she can. 



16 



INTERNATIONAL MISSIONS 
STONY FORK ASSOCIATION 



BAILEY'S CAMP - $74 1.00 to International Missions 
$ 1,033.00 to Cooperative Program 



DOE RIDGE - $337.00 to Cooperative Program 



LAYTOWN - $607.47 to International Missions 

$730.00 Lottie Moon Christmas Offering 



MT. EPHRAIM - $ 1 55.00 to Lottie Moon Christmas Offering 

$ 1,400 - other than Southern Baptist Missions 



ROCK SPRING - $ 1,075.00 to International Missions 
$^,355 to Cooperative Program 
$210.00 World Hunger 

$ 1,000.00 to other than Southern Baptist Missions 



SANDY FLAT - $1,493 03 to Lottie Moon Christmas Offering 
$340.76 to Cooperative Program 



TOTAL - $14,936.26 



A percentage of the Cooperative Program money is used for International 
Missions. 



I think this is great for a small association. Let us keep up the good work. 
We can never do too much for or give too much to missions. 

Eunice Luttrell 



17 



81 



a> 
o 

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c 
o 

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TO -Q ^ 

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CD 

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^ — '(/) 

CD 03 03 

o - 

— 03 
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:£ 

00 
CD" 



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15 



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C/3 
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c/3 d -tr 

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cu T- 

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CD S CO 

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03 O C 

:£ E O 

o o 
CO 




HOME MISSIONS (NORTH AMERICAN MISSIONS) 
STONY FORE ASSOCIATION 



BAILEY'S CAMP - $ 1,033.00 to Cooperative Program 

$233.50 to other than Southern Baptist Missions 
(Gideons) 

DOE RIDGE - $337.00 to Cooperative Program 



LAYTOWN - $646-6 1 to Home Missions 

$ 1 00.00 to other than Southern Baptist Missions 
(Broughton Hospital) 



MT. EPHRAIM - $136.00 Annie Armstrong Easter Offering 



ROCK SPRING - $635 00 to Home Missions 

$^,355 00 to Cooperative Program 
$ 166 00 to hurrican Victims 
$566.00 to other than Southern Baptist Missions 
(Gideons) 

SANDY FLAT - $654. 32 to Annie Armstrong Easter Offering 
$340.76 to Cooperative Program 



TOTAL - $5,065.4 1 (excluding Cooperative Program) 

Sandy Flat sent $ 1,500.00 to a church in West Virginia for a furnace. 

A percentage of the Cooperative Program offering is used in Home Missions. 

Once again, I feel our associational churches are doing what Jesus 
commanded us to do. We are doing missions by giving of our money. We 
can never out give God. Also, don't forget that your prayers are very 
important to out missionaries. 

Eunice Luttrell 



19 



1996 HMB Annual Report 

Refer to the SBC Annual for a comprehensive look at each program. 

1996 Annie Armstrong Easter Offering Allocations 
Missionaries and Field Ministries 



1996 Goal: $42,000,000 
$36,236,200 



E\'ANGELISM 



$3.850.000 



ASSOCIATION AL 



$4.928.000 



Evangelism Projects in Newer States 

Lay Renewal and Marketplace Evangelism 

iVledia Evangelism 

Establishing Congregations Through Revivals 
Intertaith Witness 

State Directors ot Evangelism in Newer States 

Metrop.)litan E\'angelism 

,Associational E\'angelism Leaders 

Youth Evangelism 

Ginterences 

Consultant Evangelism with Special Groups 

Evangelism Church Growth 

People Sharing Jesas 

Women's Evangelism Conference 

Ethnic Evangelism 

Afncan-Amencan Evangelism 

NTW CHURCH extension $9.224.600 

Church Planter Strategists 
Church Planter Missionanes 
Church Planter Pastors 
Church Planter Apprenuces 
Conierences/Training Workshops 
Church Planter Interns 
PRAXIS (Church-Planting Teams) 
Congregational .Assistance 
New Church Probes 
Unentered Counties 

LANGUAGE CHURCH EXTENSION $9.879. 1 00 

Ivlissionanes to more than ItX Ethnic Groups 
Lonsiuage Contextual Literature 
Radio and Television Programs 
Conterences/Training Workshops 
Congregational Assistance 

BLACK CHURCH EXTENSION $1.670.900 

Church Staner Strategists 
Church Planter Interns 
Church Planter Apprentices 
Special Projects 
Congregational Assistance 
Training Conferences 

Onentation Conferences for New Black SBC 

Churches 
Church Planter Pastors 
Communication: The Bbck Southern Baptist 

Herald Newletter 



Associanonal Directors of Missions (in Urban, 

Rural, and Metropolitan Areas) 
Development of Associations in Newer Areas 
Mega Focus Cities Strategy Planning 
Conferences/Training Workshops 
Matenals 



CHURCH AND COMMUNITY 
MINISTRIES 



$5.193.650 



Baptist Centers, Weekday Ministnes 
Literacy Missions 
Disaster Relief 

K/linistnes with Disabled Pereons, Chemical 

Dependence, and Substance Abuse 
Conferences/Training Workshops 
Migrant Ministnes 

CHAPLAIN MINISTRIES 



$361.900 



Chaplains at Mayo Clinic 
Chaplains Onentation and Conferences 
Endorsements and Service to Military, 
Healthcare, Institutional, and Business- 
Industrial Chapbins; and Pastoral 
Counselors 



SPECIAL MINISTRIES 



Student Work in Newer States 
Student Work at Service Academies 
Work with Internationals 
Seamen's Ministnes 
Resort Ministnes 

VOLUNTEER MINISTRIES 



$654.500 



$473.550 



Student Summer Missionanes 
Volunteer Involvement 

SPECIAL PROJECTS $2,263,800 



Subtotal 



$38.500,000 



This basic budget amount will support the on-going items 
presently budgeted between the state conventions and the 
Home Mission Board. 

Bold Mission Advance Funds ...$3300,000 

The 1996 Annie Armstrong Easter Offering goal was 
$42,000,000. All offering receipts over the basic budget 
amount of $38,500,000 go into Advance Funds. Advance 
Funds provide for planned and approved short-term projects 
of one to two years and/or single events in evangelism, church 
starting, church growth, and ministry. All Advance Funds go 
to the mission field. These funds allow numerous projects re- 
quested from the field to be funded that otherwise would not 
be included in the Home Mission Board budget. 



Total 



$42.000.000 



20 



The North Carolina Missions Offering 

in the 

Stony Fork Association 



Most of the North Carolina Missions Offering supports projects in the 80 
associations (covering all 100 counties) across North CaroHna. Many North 
Carolina Missions Offering projects are actually association/state missions 
programs receiving money and leadership support from both the Baptist 
State Convention and local associations. 

For example, the Stony Fork Association received approximately 10 percent 
of the 1996 special offering collected in the association. Last year (1996), 
$173.25 of the $1,749.85 collected from 4 of the association's 7 churches and 
missions (listed below) was sent back to the association. 



Churches giving to the 1996 special offering: 
STONY FORK 

Baileys Camp 
Laytown 
Mount Ephriam 
Sandy Flat 



Note: Information supplied by participating areas of work. 



21 



DID YOU KNOW? 

NORTH CAROLINA MISSIONS OFFERING FACT SHEET 

The mission needs in North Carolina are substantial. Did you know that in North Carolina 
there are: 

Over 7.3 million residents 

Over 70,000 children v^th one or more parent in prison 

More than 50 different language groups 

Nearly 200 children infected with the AIDS virus 

Over 8 million tourists who visit our state 

Over 70,000 seasonal ferm workers 

Over 4.5 million people affected by recent disasters 

Over 3.5 million unchurched people 

Through the North CaroUna Missions Offering, we can offer help and hope! 

North Carolina Baptist Disaster Relief Teams served more than 350,000 meals. 

The offering provides 100 percent of the support forNC Baptist Disaster Relief Teams. 

$700 buys a new pressure washer for Disaster Recovery. 

$5 puts a Bible in the hands of someone helped during disaster relief efforts. 

$40 provides a case of Spanish New Testaments for Hispanic seasonal farm workers. 

$90 allows a high-risk teenage girl to attend a week at Camp Redirection. 

$95 allows a child with the HIV virus to attend Camp Kid-Care. 

$50 supplies two soccer balls for an overseas sports mission team. 

$25 sends two inspirational books at Christmas to North Carolina-bom current and retired 
international missionaries. 

$6 covers costs for a child to attend Vacation Bible School for migrant children. 

$85 helps one prison inmate attend a three-day retreat at Camp Mundo Vista. 

$25 provides tracts for one weekend of Rest Stop ministry to tourists in our state. 

$1 00 provides training materials for a prayer seminar. 

$35 makes it possible for an international student to attend a Christian retreat. 

Baptist State Conventicm of NC 



22 



Baptist Children's Homes ofNC 
1 997 Book of Reports 

James D. Goldston, HI Trustee Chair 
Michael C. Blackwell, President 

At the sound of a car in his grandmother's carport, Jason looked out the window, and was 
shocked to see his mother striding toward the house. 

She was angry, and Jason shouted, "Lordy, It's momma," as he ran to the back bedroom to 
call the police. 

Just 12 years old, Jason had lived in seven foster care homes and with his grandmother on 
and off since his father died seven years earlier. His mother's addictions cost her custody of her 
only son. For whatever reason, tonight she wanted him back. 

Out of control, Jason's mother broke open the door and kicked grandmother to the floor. She 
grabbed her by the hair and 'slung me around by the hair of my head," grandmother says, 
remembering. 

Mother shouted for Jason to come out of hiding, and threatened to kill his grandmother. She 
grabbed a bottle, broke it, and held the Jagged edge to grandma's throat, shouting that she 
would kill her if Jason didn't come out of hiding. 

Just then Jason's aunt arrived from a house next door, and held his mother's arms until the 
police arrived. 

Six years later, grandmother beams with pride for Jason, who overcame that tragic, 
traumatic start in life. Jason garnered academic, athletic and leadership honors in a steady 
stream at Tuscola High School in Haywood County and is starting college in August 1997 as a 
freshman at The Citadel. 

At Tuscola, he was captain and MVP of the track and cross country teams and a conference 
champion, vice president for his senior class, Cadet Colonel and ROTC commander in a group of 
115 cadets, in National Honor Society, in the top 10 percent of his class, attended leadership 
events at Western Carolina University and Washington, D.C., and was a peer helper and peer 
counselor. 

At The Citadel he will study political sdence with a minor in military history and 
international affairs. He wants a military career as a fighter pilot, then to enter politics after 
retirement. 

Jason credits Broyhill Home, his home since that traumatic night in his grandma's house. 

'All the accomplishments of my life have been made possible by Baptist Children's 
Homes," Jason said at his final awards banquet at Broyhill Home, where he received top 
honors for the second year. 

'Broyhill has made me into a young man with a future, who knows now where he is going 
and what he wants to do. They've opened the doors to enable me to do that." 

As for grandmother, who was desperate to find a place for Jason after the incident in her 
house, she prays 'every night and I thank God every night that we have a place like Broyhill 
Home and Baptist Children's Homes." 

Jason's story is repeated hundreds of times each year at Baptist Children's Homes of 
North Carolina. Not all are as dramatic but every one tells of a young person and a family at 
the end of an unraveling rope, and of BCH tying a knot in that rope and helping them to hold 
on. 

At four residential campuses, six emergency care cottages, two homes for behaviorally 
troubled girls, a maternity home, a home for teenage mothers and their babies, therapeutic 
camping and model day care, 1,398 young people found help in troubled times last year. 

During the past year BCH received $1.5 million through the Cooperative Program, and 
$724,000 through the Thanksgiving Offering. Total church gifts of $3.05 million comprised 25 
percent of the BCH budget. 



22 



In June 1997 BCH successfully completed the $10.1 milUon 'Light Their Way' 
Campaign to raise money for operations, capital needs and endowment. Two major priorities of 
the campaign will be completed In earlyh 1998; the Winifred Lindsay Education/ 
Administrative Center at Odum Home in Pembroke, and the John D. and Amelia W. Johnson 
Collage at Mills Home. A third priority, the Hubert M. Craig Lodge at Cameron Boys Camp, 
has been completed. 

A new video, 'Families Under Construction" is available to promote the 1997 
Thanksgiving offering, which has a statewide goal of $750,000, the largest ever. 

A model program for family preservation has been initiated at Mills Home in 
Thomasville, Two social workers are on staff to work intensively with families which are at 
risk of being separated, but who, with help, can overcome their issues and stay together. 

Thomasville Area Director Bill Scarlett also is initiating ways for churches and iheir 
members to be directly involved on campus, from tutoring, to cooking, to spending early evenings 
giving personal attention to residents to free staff for more intensive counseling. 

Baptist Children's Homes' work was featured in November on "The 700 Club" and in 
December on CNN. BCH also adopted a missions statement this year, which is "helping 
hurting children, healing broken families.' 

Wherever children are hurting and families are strained, BCH strives to heal. 



23 



Making Life for Older Adults. . . 

The Best of Times 



Thank you, North Carolina Baptists! 

Our February Offering this year was the 
strongest yet. Gifts through the Cooperative 
Program have come to us above the norm. 
Thank you for making h possible for us to 
make this year "The Best of Times" for so 
many North Carolina Baptist Older Adults. 

NEWPLACES 

Clifiwood Retirement Community, 
Fayetteville 

Opening in early 1999, The ClifEwood 
Retirement Community is designed to meet 
the needs of middle income Older Aduhs. It 
will offer residents a continuum of care 
ranging from Independent Living and 
Assisted Living options to nursing care. 

A New Retirement Community, 
Concord 

Design work for a new continuing care 
retirement community in the Concord area 
has begun with ground breaking expected in 
the spring of 1998. 

NEWPROGRAMS 

Home and Community Based Programs 

The Solarium Programs for Older Aduhs 
suffering from dementia related disorders are 
well established in the Prince Nursing Center 
at Brookridge Retirement Community in 
Winston-Salem and in the Rickman Nursing 
Center at the Western North Carolina 
Baptist Home in Asheville. 



A new home arid community based program 
offering respite care to Older Aduhs in the 
Asheville area began this year. This service 
provides safe, structured, creative 
enrichment for seniors diagnosed with 
dementia-related disorders such as 
Alzheimer's disease, and provides reUef for 
families giving in-home care to these dear 
ones. 

NEWPEOPLE 

Winston-Salem, Albemarle, Hamilton and 
Asheville 

Margaret Almond has joined the Executive 
Management Group as Vice President for 
Development. 

Tammy Harwood brings nursing and 
management skills to the position of Home 
Manager and Administrator at the Taylor 
House in Albemarle. 

Paulette Richmond is completing a year of 
service as Home Manager/ Administrator at 
The Hamilton Baptist Home in Hamilton. 
Edgar Ferrell, retired pastor of Black 
Mountain First Baptist, now serves as 
Chaplain at the Western North CaroUna 
Baptist Home in Asheville. 
Calvin Knight serves as Chaplain at the 
Brookridge Retirement Community in 
Winston-Salem. 

We send this report v^th our gratitude for 
your prayers and gifts enabling us to make 
life for Baptist Older Aduhs ... 



The Best of Times! 




William B. Stillerman 
Baptist Retu-ement Homes 
of North CaroUna, Inc. 



24 



^5 

"Touching Lives With Hope" 



HOSPITAL HIGHLIGHTS 

Since opening its doors in 1923, The North Carohna Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated has 
remained fully committed to the purpose of carrying out a ministry of healing as taught by Jesus 
Christ. It is this Christ-like spirit that has led patients such as Helen Keller to write: "When I was 
coming out from under surgery, they treated me with fine love, and I could feel it. I have been in 
places where it didn't matter how many times you pressed the call button, you would just lie there 
and wait, but the nurses at Baptist Hospital always came right away. If I ever have to go back to a 
hospital, this is where I would come." 

Baptist Benevolent Care Fund 

Baptist Churches from all across North Carolina joined us in mutual mission through the 
Mother's Day Offering. This annual ingathering of love was approved by the Baptist State 
Convention of North Carolina in 1924. In 1996 the MDO amounted to $456,497.00. It was used 
exclusively to help patients who had little or no health care insurance or other financial means to 
pay their hospital bills. From this past year's offering, over $200,000 was used to assist members 
of our Baptist Churches. May God bless all those who gave so generously. 

Division of Pastoral Care 

During the year the Chaplains and Staff of the Pastoral Care Department provide worship 
services in Davis Chapel on Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday for patients and family 
members. The Pastoral Care Department staff supervised 65 students during the year. They 
made more than 50,000 ministry contacts, an increase of 10% over the previous year. 

CareNet, Inc. continues to grow. There are now 13 counseling centers located in strategic 
areas across the state. During the year these centers will provide over 26,000 hours of counseling. 

The Center for Congregational Health, Inc., continues to expand its assistance to ministers 
and churches. Programs and assistance offered to churches include Consultants and Intentional 
Interims working with churches as they face the challenges of today. The Young Leader's 
Program helps in leadership development, and the Clergy Wellness Program, Turning Point, is 
designed to foster a holistic growth-approach to the individual minister's life calling. 

Points of Emphasis and Progress 

J. PAUL STICHT CENTER - In April the J. Paul Sticht Center on Aging and Rehabilitation 
opened the doors of a new 240,000 square foot state-of-the-arts building. Here services are 
provided to older adults. These services include a geriatric assessment clinic. Acute Care for the 
Elderly clinic, Alzheimer's disease and memory disorders clinic, osteoporosis clinic, geriatric 
gynecology clinic, a women's health center, education services, and a legal clinic for seniors. It 
houses a true "Day Hospital" for seniors - the first in the state - which provides therapy, examina- 
tions and rehabilitation as day-time treatment, eliminating costly overnight stays. 



The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated 

25 



Meeting the 
Challenges of . . 

Health Care ±\epOrt tO 

1997 the Associations 




"Touching Lives With Hope" 



COMPREHAB - On November 4, 1996, the doors were opened to The Medical Center's new 
CompRehab Center. The 70,000 square-foot building houses a full sp)ectrum of physical rehabili- 
tation and related clinical services, including a Sports Medicine Center, Foot and Ankle Center, 
The Hand Center, Outpatient Physical Therapy Center, Spine Center, and the Neurorehabilitation 
Center. 

TRAUMA CENTER - The Medical Center has the only designated Level I trauma center in 
Northwest North Carolina. In the trauma center our goal is for the patient to be in an operating 
room 10 minutes after arriving at the Emergency Department. Surgeons, anesthesiologists and 
staff remain on duty 24 hours a day to handle such emergencies. 

TOPS IN RESEARCH - According to a report in the February issue of Applied Clinical Trials, 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine ranked in the top 10 U.S. clinical research institutions. 

QUALCHOICE - Established by The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated, The 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine, and Wake Forest University, this managed care plan provides 
quality health care and patient physician choice. QualChoice is now able to offer coverage to 
ministers and church staffs. 

WEB SITE - You can learn more about The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated by 
checking us out on our Web site at: http://www.bgsm.edu. Here you can find helpful information 
about nutrition, research, and the division of Pastoral Care. 

HEALTH ON-CALL ™- Need a physician or answers to quesfions about health topics? Dial 
(800) 446-2255. A registered nurse will take your call and help you select the right physician, 
answer your questions, provide information or mail printed material to you. 

SWITCHBOARD - Assistance and information can be obtained by contacting one of our helpful 
and courteous switchboard operators at (910) 716-201 1. 



In the midst of changing health-care norms, we will not deviate from the mission entrusted to us 
by the Baptist people of North Carolina. We stand fully committed to excellence and compas- 
sion, and remain visionary as we face the demands of the health care market. Under the provi- 
dence of God, we will continue to find the ways and means to be successful without compromise. 

Respectfully submitted. 



A CLOSING WORD 




Len B. Preslar, Jr. \/ 
President 

The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated 



The North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Incorporated 



26 



NORTH CAROLINA BAPTIST 
COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES - 1997 

Serving North Carolina Baptists for 862 years 



1996 COLlJ«E AM) UNIVERSnYMTA , : 



CAMPBELL UNIVERSITY 

• Opened January 5. 1 887 as Buies' Creek Academy. 

• BecatiK Buies ' Creek Junior College, August 21. 1 924 

• Authonzed by Baptist State Convention to become Campbell 
College. December 17, 1926 

• Began a seruor college program with the junior class in 1 961 

• School of Law founded in 1976. 

• Graduate program in Education launched in 1 977. m 
Business, 1978 

• Became Campbell Utiivcrsity on June 6, 1 979 School of 
Pharmac) and School of Education founded m 1985. 

• School of Divinity founded in 1 995. 
Norman A Wiggins. President 

CHOWAN COLLEGE 

• l ounded and opened lor students as Chowan Female 
Insuiutc, OciobcT 1 1, 1K48 

• First called Chowan Female Collegiate Insiimte in 1851. 

• First called Chowan Baptist Female Institute w 1868 

• Became Chowan College on May 17, 1910 

• Became coeducational senior college, 1 93 1 

• Changed to a junior college. September 1 9?7 

• Changed to senior college status. Fall 1 992. 
Stanley G. Lott. President 

GARDNER-WEBB UNIVERSITY 

• First chartered as Boiling Springs High School. December 2, 
1905 

• Opened as Boiling Springs Junior College, September 3, 
1928 

• Name changed and new charter granted to Gardner-Webb 
Juruor College, Inc , June 1942. 

• Cliartcr amended in conformity to the Consuiution of the NC 
Baptist Slate Convention, November 1 946. 

• Became o fully accredited scmor college December 1 , 1 971 . 

• Became Gardner-Webb Umvcrsity on January 1 , 1 99.1, and 
opened School of Divinity, Fall 1993. 

M. Christopher White, President 

MARS HILL COLLEGE 

• First conuncnccmcnt as French Broad Bapiist Instiivue, July 
4, 1856 

• Chartered as Mars Hill College, Febmary 16, 1859. 

• Opened as Mars Hill Junior College, August 1 4 , 1 922. 

• Began a senior college program in 1962. 
A. Max Lennon, President 



MEREDITH COLLEGE 

• Incorporated as Baptist Female University of NC, February 

27, 1891 

• Opened for smdents, September 27, 1 899 

• Became Baptist University for Women by legislative 
enactment, January 20, 1905. 

• Became Meredith College bv legislative enactment, Januaiy 

24. 1911. 

John E Weems, President 
WINGATE UNIVERSITY 

• Authorized as Winptc School of Union Baptist Association. 
1895 Opened 1896, chartered 1897 

• Became B jimior college m 1923 

• Baptist State Convention asstoned sponsorship; withdrew in 

1 930 and returned Wuigate College to support by Union and 
other associations 

• Trustees first Bppomtcd by N C Baptist State Convenuon m 
1949 

• Became a senior college in 1 977. 

• Began offering graduate work m 1 985 

• Became Winpate University in 1995. 
Jerry E. McGee, President 

WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY 

• Opened as Wake Forest Institute, Februarv 3, 1 8.34 

• Chartered as Wake Forest College, Wake Forest, December 

28, 1838. 

• Bowmim Gray Medical School of Wake Forest College, 
Winston-Salem, officially opened July 1, 1941; first class 
September 10, 1941. 

• Wake Forest College authort/fd by special session of 
Convention meeting in Crreensboro, July 30. 1 946, to move to 
Winston-Salem. 

• First session tn Winston-Salem began with the summer term, 
June 18, 1956, Wake Forest College became a university, 
June 12, 1967. 

• Baptist Suie Convention and Wake Forest Umversiry 
established a new relationifhip on Novailber II, 1986 as 
descnbcd in the Convention's Constitution, Article XTV. 

Thomas K Hearn, Jr., President 

Meredith College has formally requested a new relationship 
with the Baptist State Convention, patterned after the one 
with Wake Forest University. The matter will be voted 
upon dunng the November 11-12, 1997 Convention 



27 



NORTH CAROLrNA BAPtlST FOUHDATION, INC. 
1996 ANNUAL REPORT 



Distributions 

1920-1996 





16 . 




14 - 

1 r 




12 - 

1 mm 




10 - 


c 




o 


8 - 




6 - 




4 - 




2 - 




- 




1920-1980 1981-1984 1985-1988 1989-1992 1993-1996 



■ 


^Individuals 




Charity 



The mission of the Hbrth CarollmrBapttotFouikfatton. since Its inception in 
1920 has been to assist the Convention and Its Riirtltutlons and agencies in 
generating endowment to enhance their pernianent financial support The 
uniqueness of the ministries and services provided bylhe institutions and General 
Board staff merits increased Indkidual collective financial support The Baptist 
Foundation is committed to assisting individual church members through creative 
stewardship methods to provide permanent financial underglrding of these 
ministries. 

As of December 31, 1996, the Foundatioif held $60,892,220 under 
management In 1996, $2,600,680 was distributed ta Baptist work and $1,259,082 
was distributed to individuals for a total dlstributiorrof $3,869,762. 

The income distributions for the entire 77-year history of the N, C. Baptist 
Foundation totals: $10,^2,7^4 Income paid to Indiylduals and $16,059,259 to 
Baptist churches, institutions and mission causes for a grand historical total of 
$26,992,023. 

Richard D. Laws, Chairman of the Board 
Rai|^ W. Dixon, Jr., Executive Director 



THE BIBLICAL RECORDER 



Associatlonal Report — 1997 

These are "watershed years" for Baptists! Analysts almost daily remind 
us that the radical changes in society and the erosion of so much that has 
been precious to us in our religious life is creating a time of major 
"transition" as we Baptists and other church groups face the 21st century. 

Biblical Recorder tries to tell the whole story with a focus on the 
many positive things people are doing in their churches and world missions, 
along with the crucial issues which cannot be concealed and ignored if we 
honor our heritage from yesterday and fulfill our mission for tomorrow. 

There is no way to address these issues without correct and reliable 
information. The Biblical Recorder was born and continues to serve for that 
purpose. In the 164 years of state Baptist papers in North Carolina, never 
wa the Recorder more needed than now for people to have the truth. 

People are reading less than any time In recent history at the very 
time there is an Increased number of publications and periodicals. It is 
true of secular publications, it is true of wholesome books from respected 
libraries, it is true of religious publications. We live in an electronic 
age, what some have described as an "information glut." 

An informed Baptist is a better Baptist; no democracy, including our 
local churches, can survive long without an informed, involved constituency 
which makes decisions based upon accurate information from reliable sources. 

The Biblical Recorder should be in every Baptist home in North 
Carolina. Your support as a subscriber and reader, coupled with your 
encouragement to others, will enable the paper to better serve the 
constituency with accurate and helpful information. 

In order to save churches large amounts of money and to increase the 
readership of the Recorder . Church News Service (CNS) was launched in 1990. 
This system lets any congregation have their church news incorporated into 
the Biblical Recorder which saves staff time, postage and printing 
costs. Usually, for less than what it costs to produce the church 
newsletter, CNS gives the entire Baptist communication package to each 
family in the congregation. Recent and anticipated increases in mailing 
costs makes CNS a greater value now than ever before. 

The paper deliberately focuses more attention on North Carolina 
Baptists with news, features and Inspirational articles which will encourage 
individuals and churches In their witness and ministry. One sure way to 
conquer problems and overcome the barriers to effective witness and ministry 
is to have the facts, know the issues and be adequately Informed. 

That is why the Recorder was born; that is why it serves today. For 
more information on how your church can subscribe or use CNS, contact: 

The Biblical Recorder 
232 West Millbrook Road 
Raleigh, NO 27609 
(919) 847-2127 
E'-roail; 70420, 66§compuserve, com 



29 



DISCIPLESHIP TRAINING 
REPORT TO THE ASSOCIATION 



Discipleship Training is an appropriate name for the work to which 
Go has called you and me. Being a disciple has been the purpose of 
every follower of Jesus Christ since our Lord began calling 
disciples two thousand years ago. 

The Associational Discipleship Training goal in the Stony Fork 
Association is to serve as a support system for the discipling 
efforts of the local churches. 

I attended one training conference at Caraway Conference Center 
this past year. 

"M" Night was held at Doe Ridge Baptist Church. There were three 
churches represented, two pastors and two visitors. The program 
was on "how to witness", taught by Rev. Fred Lunsford and Sharon 
Kepart . 



Charles Craig 



30 



WOMEN ON MISSION 
REPORT TO THE ASSOCIATION 



Hand in hand we worked together as an associational WMU, doing 
missions in 1996. 

Hand in hand we need to be teaching our children, young people, as 
well as adults about Christ. The WMU of each church has a 
responsibility to be informed about our missionaries and their 
needs so that we can inform our pastors and churches about these 
needs . 

The Mission Mosaic magazine is one of the best resources we have 
that tells us about our missionaries. Everyone should read it, not 
just the WMU ladies. 

This year we had 27 ladies plus Roy Gryder, acting Director of 
Missions, go to Ridgecrest for the annual state WMU meeting. We 
all had a great time. 

We did a pastor and wives appreciation dinner at Rock Springs. 
Rev. Morris Hatton was the speaker. 

At Christmas we had a husband and wife dinner at the Western Steer 
in Lenoir. Each person there took a missionary's name and sent 
them a Christmas card. It was exciting to hear from them when they 
answered the letters and cards. 

Our annual meeting was held at Rock Springs also. Attendance was 
good at this meeting. 

This year, our associational WMU helped one of our members who was 
in financial need. 

Walter and Jackie Ford, missionaries to Africa, came to speak to 
us. They are members of Bailey's Camp church. 

We now have two Mission Friends groups in the association. Pray 
for them and their leaders. 

Each church WMU is doing great things to carry out the commission 
that Jesus gave us to do missions. 

The associational Women on Missions is here to help our pastors and 
our churches with any mission work we can. Please pray for us that 
we will always carry out the plan that God has for us. 



Eunice Luttrell 



31 



Christian Action League of Nonfa Carolina, Inc. 
ANNUAL REPORT TO THE ASSOCIATIONS 
1997 

According to Dr. Jama Kennedy of Coral Ridge Ministries, approximately 6 million crimes are committed in tfae United States 
annually. Murder arrests of teens are up 92% since 1985; the number of 13'to 15-year-olds arrested for murder nearly doubled between 19S2 
and 1 992; 1 .6 million cars are stolen each year, America spends S39 billion a year on police protection, S29 billion on prisons and SI billion 
on legal and judicial costs for criminal cases; drunk drivers cost us SllO billion a year, and drug abuse costs S40 billion a year. With these 
alarming statistics, the Christian Action League of North Carolina is constantly working to restore moral and biblical principles to our state and 
nation through the legislative process and the public education system and by assisting communities in our state with local battles for civic and 
moral righteousness. 

A. ChrLttian Values 

• It was the pleasure of the Christian Action League to sponsor the Second Annual Christian Heritage Week In North Carolina, March 16- 
22. The League encouraged schools, churches and communities to recognize, commemorate and learn about the Christian heritage and 
history of our nation. We mailed information about a League sponsored essay contest to be written on America's Christian Heritage to all 
high schools (public and private) in the state and hosted an awards ceremony and banquet for the top state winners of that contest in 
Raleigh. 

• Lobbied for and promoted SB 442. The American History Act. A bill that would allow public school teachers to read or display historical 
documents even though they contain religious references. This bill passed the legislature and is now a law. 

• The League continued a project in 1997 to distribute copies of the Ten Commandments throughout Nor* Carolina. To date, over 10,000 
copies of these prints have been distributed. 

• l>mTnnreri Snnctitv of Human Life Sundav 

• Presented copies of Dr. Billy Graham's speech to the May 5, 1997, Joint Session of the General Assembly on audio cassette to members of 
the Legisianire and ofTered copies through our newsletter. Dr. Graham was being honored for his tremendous worldwide contributions to 
religion, morality, racial equality and family. 

• Promoted ajid worked for riie passage n f HH S 1 1 Rvolution Not Tatight an Fact. 

• Published The Beacon newsletter quarterly with circulation of 22,000. Kept concerned citizens informed on moral issues via e-mail, fax 
networks, church and civic club presentations. 

B. t-ottfrv 

Lottery proponents felt this was the year to bring a state-sponsored lottery to Nordi Carolina. The League, through letters, e-mail and 
faxes, kept the Christian community updated on tottery information and encouraged its members to contact their legislators. The lawmakers 
received a barrage of letters and calls from across the state saying that the lottery was a bad bet for North Carolina. The League will continue 
to monitor this issue as the session nears an end. but as of today, the lottery seems to have been defeated for another session. 

C. ygr Fducatlom 

Worked with other Christian and pro-family groups to see that the state mandate for Abstinence Until Marriage education was 
implemented state-wide. Also supported efforts to insure that federal grant money was used to promote abstinence education 

D Ahnrtion 

The League lobbied for and encouraged its members through Legislative Alerts to write in support of HB 303 and SB 536 (Ban 
Partial Birth Abortion), HB 594 (Fetus Death from Criminal Act) and HE 536 (AbortionAVoman's Right to Know). We offered the video 
"Reversing Roe" through our newsletter. This video tells the story of Norma McCorvey (Jane Roe) of the infamous Roe vs. Wade Supreme 
Court case who after 25-years and 35 million aborted babies tells of her transformation from an abortion industry pawn to a pro-life Christian. 

CAL supported efforts to strengthen the traditional family and addressed the radical homosexual agenda. Successftilly lobbied against 
legislation that would have eradicated present N. C. law making homosexuality illegal. Offered the powerful and emotional video of Michael 
Johnston "On Wings Like Eagles". This video tells of Michael's 1 1 years in the homosexual lifestyle and his struggle between right and wrong 
and about forgiveness and grace Michael is founder of Kerusso Ministries, an organization to help others struggling with this sin. 

F. dJaUud 

Monitored all legislation concerning alcohol and other drugs. Successfully supported efforts to strengthen current DWI laws. Worked 
with communities in helping them set up an organization to combat liquor referenda. Lobbied against SB 838 (ABC Tourism Resorts Permits); 
SB 837 (Sports Club ABC Permits), SB 447 (Lumbenon Economic Development District) and HB 651 (Interstate Economic Zones). These 
bills allow alcohol sales without the vote of local citizens. Provided awareness, education and resoiuxe materials related to substance abuse 
problems to churches, communities, etc. 

G. Pomotraphv 



Lobbied for SB 452 (Local Regulation of Adult Establishments) and notified citizens to contact their legislators and encourage them 
to vote for this legislation that would give local governments more control in regulating these establishments. 




32 



OBITUARIES 

DOE RIDGE - Mrs susie Harmon 

LAYTOWN - Mrs. Nadine Holt, Mr. Walter Bryant and Mr. Jimmy Watson 
SANDY FLAT - Mrs Bessie Coffey 

Linda Mills, Clerk 



RESOLUTIONS 



Let it be so resolved that Stony Fork Association expresses its 
thanks and appreciation to Mt. Ephraim and Rock Spring Churches for 
their hospitality and delicious food. 

We would like to thank God for our Moderator, Director of Missions, 
and all those who gave excellent reports over the past two days. 



Betty Woods 



stony Fork Baptist Association 
Approved Budget 
for 
1997-1998 



Director of Missions (expense): $ 900.00 

Clerk honorarium: 250.00 

Treasurer honorarium: 250.00 

VBS: 200.00 

Discipleship Training: 150.00 

Sunday School: 100.00 

Evangelism (inc. conference) 200.00 

WMU: 350.00 

Convention ( 2 persons ) : 200 . 00 

Clerical: 50.00 

Minutes: 250.00 

Benevolent fund: 1000 . 00 

Total: $3900.00 



34 



I respectfully request that the following be accepted as 
the Stewardship report to the one hundred and thirty sixth 
annual meeting of the Stony Fork Baptist Association 

A Brief History Of The Mission Work Done By The Stony 
Fork Baptist Association Since 1990 

The work may have actually started in September of 1989 
when the association voted to discontinue receiving funds 
from the Baptist State Convention. By moving out on faith 
rather than depend on the Convention to help us we became 
more aware of what a wonderful amount of talent we had within 
our association. Let me give you a quick rundown of how we 
have used that talent since that time. 

1990 We contributed to the expense of three men who went to 
Brazil to do construction work on churches there. 

1992: We sent nine people to do construction work on 

Richville Baptist Chapel in Richville NY. This is a 
town about the size of Trade TN. The Baptist church 
there also provides a school for many children in the 
area. The association provided the materials and labor 
to cover an exposed walkway, install gutters on a part 
of the building, install kitchen cabinets and do a 
number of much needed repairs on the building. 

1993: We sent ten people to Watertown NY to assist in the 
construction of a new building to house New Hope 
Baptist Church. The church had been meeting in an old 
building that had at one time been a tavern. We 
installed and finished drywall throughout the new 
building as well as installing interior and exterior 
doors. One of the men who went to Watertown was so 
concerned about finishing the job that he went back and 
spent a week to help complete the drywall work. 

1994: We contributed almost $200.00 toward a mission trip to 
Russia by William Kanupp. 

In August of 1994 we sent a check for $900 to Trinity 
Baptist Church on Long Island NY to purchase a 
baptistry. Then in September of 1994 we sent four 
people to Trinity to do work on the church building and 
new parsonage. We installed the baptistry, roofed over 
half of the new parsonage and installed the windows and 
doors . 



35 



1995: We sent four people to Central Hunterdon Baptist Church 
in Flemington NJ to help on construction of a new 
church building. We did wiring and construction of a 
stage for the pulpit as well as a number of assorted 
smaller jobs. 

1996: In March of this year we contributed $500.00 to each of 
two members of the Association who were facing large 
hospital bills. 

In July we sent five people to Rupert WV to do 
construction on Rupert Baptist Church. The work done 
included laying much of the brick on the outside of the 
church, installing a drop ceiling in the vestibule and 
wiring. 

1997: We contributed $554.00 to a lady who was about to lose 
her home. This made two of her house payments. 

The work that is listed above was done in addition to the 
normal work of the Association. The V.B.S. clinics, the 
Sunday School training sessions, M Night and all the W.M.U. 
Activities that normally take place were carried on as usual. 



This document will fill the twofold purpose of acting as 
the stewardship report for 1997 and summarizing the work of 
the Association. It is my plan to use this information in my 
efforts to determine if any churches who have previously been 
affiliated with the Association feel led to return to this 
Association. 



Respectfully Submitted 



Roy C . Gryder 



36 



goals as Director ox Missions for "the coming year. 



To provide all possible assistance to any pastor, officer 
or organization worker or any other member of the 
Association who requests my help. 

To continue to educate myself in as many areas as possible 
in order that I may better serve the members of this 
Association. I will attend training classes and seminars 
that offer help to be a better Director of Missions. 



To improve the newsletter. I will ask one person in each 
church to act as a "reporter" for their church. This 
person will gather the news of their church for the coming 
month and pass it on to me and I will pass it on to you 
through the newsletter. I also want to increase the 
readership by mailing a copy to each person who would like 
to receive one. 



To publish an Associational directory. This would include 
the names, addresses and phone number of anyone I can 
think of that we might need to call or write. 



To visit each of the churches in the Association at least 
six Sunday mornings during the year. In addition to this I 
will attend as many of our special occasions as I can. 

To contact some of the churches who have separated 
themselves from the Association and have not affiliated 
with another Association. My objective would be to 
determine if they would consider renewing their 
affiliation with us. 



Roy C. Gryder, D.O.M. 



37 



PROCEEDINGS 
FOR 

THE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-SDCrH ANTRAL MEETING 

OF 

STONY FORK MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION 



The meeting was called to order at 8:30 a..m. on Friday, August 8, 1997 at Mt. Ephraim Baptist 
Church by the moderator, Roy Kanupp. The meeting was conducted in the following order with 
all reports being approved by the congregation. 

8:35 Song - "How Firm a Foundation". 

8:40 Moved, seconded and approved to be seated in conference. 

8:45 Devotion was led by Tim Dockery from Romans 12: 1-12. Having a right relationship 
with God. Don't ask God to humble you, the Bible says to humble yourself 

8:50 Moved for the adoption of the program, seconded and approved with changes to be 
made where necessary. 

8:55 Roll Call 

Bailey's Camp 3, Doe Ridge 5, Laj^own 1, Mt. Ephraim 8, Rock Spring 3, Sandy 

Flat 6, Visitors 2, total 28. 
9:00 Recognition of New Pastors and workers in the Association. Tim Shook, pastor at 

Sandy Flat was recognized. 
9:02 Vacation Bible School Report - Edith Gryder. Remember to report your VBS to 

the State Convention, the Southern Baptist Convention and the Association. Extra 

forms are available if you need one. 
9:05 Foreign Missions - Eunice Luttrell, Women on Mission Director, gave report of 

what had been done by each church in the Association. 
9:10 Sunday School - Report will be given tomorrow. 
9:11 Cooperative Program - No speaker, 
9:12 Evangelism - No speaker. 

9:15 Financial Report - Edith Gryder. Copies of the purposed budget for 1997-1998 
were handed out. This will be voted on during business meeting tomorrow. Tim 
Dockery explained oversight by Mt. Ephraim on contribution to the Association. 
This is being corrected. 

9:30 Break. 

10:00 Home Missions - Women on Mission gave this report on what each church in the 

Association gave to this offering. 
10:10 N.C. State Missions Offering - Eunice Luttrell. Also gave a report of local missions 

performed by each church. This report is also included in the reports section. 
10:15 Children's Homes - No speaker. 

10:16 Retirement Homes - Mamie Craig. The February offering last year was the strongest 
so far. 

10:20 Baptist Hospital - Jim Murphy, Speaker. The Baptist Hospital is your hospital since 
1924. The Mothers Day Offering is a special one used to help people who need 



38 



financial assistance. These people are fi-om all over the world, a boy fi-om Virginia 
and a boy fi-om the Phillippines. Just yesterday a little 4 V2 year old boy came in with 
leukemia and needs a bone marrow transplant. His baby brother, 3 years old, also 
has leukemia. We are praying that matches can be found and we can help them as 
their parents have no insurance. 

When I come and say "thank you" you just don't know much. Lives have been 
saved because you give to this offering. Come tour the hospital any time and I 
will show you around. 

10:35 Christian Higher Education - No speaker. 

10:36 Baptist Foundation - No speaker. 

10:37 Stewardship - No speaker. 

10:40 Moved, seconded and approved to allow Harold Ward speak on the Mexican Mission 
today, answer questions and will consider during the business meeting tomorrow. 

Building churches in Mexico. We are excited about this. We have just started 
work in Leon. The cost is between $13,000 and $14,000. We can get one put up 
in a week. We have a National pastor with us and he makes a list of those making 
a profession of faith and follows up with a visit later. Their pastors are really concerned 
about them and encourage and help them to study and learn all they can. They are so 
excited about Jesus. 

11:10 Annual Message - Tim Dockery. 1 Timothy 1 : 1 -20. Many people have responded to 
Jesus' call to serve Him. He is the greatest Master anyone can serve. We need to 
accept his calling. We may have to leave some things behind when we answer the 
call. I'm never standing alone, Jesus is always standing with me, to give me direction. 
Are you willing to accept the challenge to fall in line with Jesus and His word? We 
must have concern for God's sheep and direct them, this is our calling. We have to 
to do it by God's way and go forth with him. 

I have three charges to the pastors and churches: 

1 . Sound doctrine - based on God's word. There is only one way, one road, by the 
shed blood of Jesus Christ. Our main purpose is to preach sound doctrine to reach 
the lost sheep. 

2. Proclaim the Word - Jesus came into the world to save sinners. We are to be 
concerned about others as He was, to be on a mission to reach the lost. Paul is 
proof that any sinner can be saved. He went fi"om a murderer to a missionary. No 
matter what happens, God will see me through. 

3. Defend the Faith - Have a good conscience with Godly living. Fight a good fight, 
stay with it and finish the work. Paul held on in faith in God. Paul gave us two 
examples of people who made a shipwreck of their lives. 

Are you willing to accept the challenge to go forth and march on for Jesus? We must 



39 



all work together to carry out His ministry as His servants. 
12:00 Blessing - Lunch 

PROCEEDINGS 

FOR 
SECOND DAY 
AT 

ROCK SPRING 
AUGUST 9, 1997 

8:30 Call to order by Moderator, ■ 
8:35 Song "Victory in Jesus". 
8:40 Prayer. 

8:45 Special Singing by Ron Burgett. 

Devotion - Ron Burgett. Ezra 9: 1-8. Three reasons we are not experiencing 
Revival: 1 . No brokenness over sin in our lives. 2. No burden - we want the 
blessings without assuming the burden. 3 . No bending of the knees - the church 
is dying on its feet because it is not on its knees. 

9:00 Roll Call - 

Bailey's Camp 3, Doe Ridge 4, Laytown 3, Mt. Ephraim 1, Rock Spring 7, Sandy 
Flat 5, total 22. 

9:05 Biblical Recorder - No speaker. 

9:06 Discipleship Training - Charles Craig. Jesus called out men to follow Him and teach 
others the things He taught them. We need to be concerned about the needs of our 
neighbors. If we cannot walk across the street to witness to them, do we really think 
God is going to send us somewhere else? I plan to attend training at Caraway where 
the speaker will address "Involving Our People" and I will share this with you later. 
I will plan "M Night" a little later in the fall. 

9:15 Women on Mission - Eunice Luttrell. Even though we are often discouraged because 
of lack of interest, we will keep on going as long as we are an association. I ask you 
to get involved with all the things announced in the association. 

9:25 Temperance and Morals - Christian Action League. No speaker. 

9:30 General Board Report - Ron Burgett. The first meeting was in Jan. There are 120 
members. There are three meetings a year and it is very informative. We make 
decisions for the time between the annual meetings. I am serving on the Christian 
Higher Education Committee. I toured the Baptist State Building as a new member 
of the board at the first meeting. 

9:35 Stewardship Report - Roy Gryder. (See reports section). This report will be used to 
invite churches back into the Association. 

9:45 Break. 

10:05 Sunday School Report - Ted Triplett. I will try to visit each church later on and 
bring a report on the history of Sunday School then. I will plan another training 
session this year. 

10:15 Showed a Mandate tape about work in the BSC and tour of the building in Cary. 
10:30 Resolutions - Betty Woods. 



40 



10:35 Obituaries - Clerk. 

10:40 Business meeting: Nominating Committee made the following nominations for 
officers for the coming year: 

Moderator - Roy Kanupp, Vice Moderator - Arvil Hardy, Nominating Committee 
Chairman - Max West, Clerk - Linda Mills, Treasurer - Edith Gryder, Sunday 
School director - Ted Triplett, Discipleship Training - Charles Craig, Music 
Director - Pauline Eldreth, Stewardship and Cooperative Program Director - Linda 
Mills, Home Missions, State Missions, Foreign Missions will be done by the Women 
on Mission Director - Eunice Luttrell, Retirement Homes - Mamie Craig, Children's 
Homes - Max West, Resolutions - Betty Woods, Obituaries - Clerk, Vacation Bible 
School - Edith Gryder, Baptist Hospital - Bonnie Walsh, Christian Higher Education 
and Temperance and Morals (Christian Action League) - Tim Shook, Baptist 
Foundation - Dale Luttrell, Outreach Evangelism - Tim Dockery. 

Committees: 

Finance Committee - Chairman Edith Gryder, Ray Kanupp, Roy Gryder, Linda Mills, 
Tim Dockery. 

Missions Committee - Chairman Roy Kanupp, pastors of each church. 
Constitution and By-Laws Committee - Missions Committee and Charles Craig. 

Amendment to Constitution and By-Laws - under Director of Missions - C 
Service Ministry #2 to add "if he is an ordained minister" after employment. 
Section 3 - Qualifications - E. Experience - pastoral ministry preferred. 

Roy Gryder was elected as Director of Missions for 1997-1998. 

It was moved, seconded and approved for all of the above business. 

Proposed project for mission trip to Mexico. Max West moved to use 
$4,000.00 of the Associational money for the Mexico mission trip. This 
was seconded and approved. 

Danny Murphy proposed that the other five churches do the best they can, 
the Association give $4,000 and Laytown will do the rest and tell Harold Ward 
to build the church in Mexico in Nov. Seconded and approved. 

11:45 Annual Message - Ron Burgett. Acts 2:41-47. We need to get excited about 

what God has done for us. Jesus said keep my commandments. We measure the 
the degree of how much we love Him by how much we obey Him. Churches are 
feuding instead of fellowshiping. If we could only see ourselves as God sees us, 
we would see the need for revival. We need to go with the Gospel of Christ and tell 
people what he has done in our lives. There are 4 things about the church I want 
to talk about: 

1 . Had a purpose - Where there is no vision the people perish. Our purpose is 
is to reach the lost and disciple them. 



41 



2. Had a partnership - They shared a cooperative fellowship to 
evangelize the community. 

3 . They prayed - What we could do if we really prayed together. We need 
prayer warriors in our churches who will stay on their knees for hours. That is 
where the power is. 

4. They praised God - Exalted the Savior. He is worthy of all the praise, honor, 
and glory we can lift up. We need to praise Him with our live and our lips. Let 
us be people with a purpose, in a partnership to reach the lost, praying and 
praising Him as we go. 

12:30 Adjournment-Lunch. 



42 



HISTORY AND HISTORICAL TABLE 



fflSTORY AND fflSTORICAL TABLE 



Year Churches 



Moderator 



Clerk 



Preacher 



1862 

1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 



Zions Gate Meeting Larkin Hodges Larkin Pipes 
House, Wilkes Co. 

Yellow Hill Larkin Hodges Larkin Pipes 

Minuets were not printed, manuscript got lost 



Mt. Ephraim 
South Fork 
Watauga 
Union 
Stony Fork 
Old Field 
Elk 

Mt. Vernon 
Watauga 
Yellow Hill 
Laurel Fork 
Stony Fork 
Poplar Grove 
Old Field 
Elk 

Mt. Vernon 
Watauga 
Mt. Ephraim 
Yellow Hill 
Boones Fork 
Buffalo Cove 
Stony Fork 
Union 

Laurel Fork 
Poplar Grove 
Mt. Vernon 
Watauga 
Mt. Paran 
Boones Fork 
Yellow Hill 
New River 
Elk 

Laurel Fork 
Buffalo Cove 

Mt. Vernon 

Watauga 



Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 

Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Hodges 

J.F. Eller 
J.F. Eller 

Larkin Hodges 

J.F. Eller 

E.M. Gragg 

E. M. Gragg 
James Parsons 

F. M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 
J.C. Miller 
E.M. Gragg 
E.M. Gragg 



J.R. Hodges 
Elijah Trivette 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
James Parsons 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
Elijah Trivette 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
W.E. Greene 
Elijah Trivette 
John R. Hodges 
Elijah Trivette 
Thomas Pipes 
Thomas Pipes 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
Wm. M. Lee 
RH. Pipes 
Wm. M. Lee 



Larkin Hodges 

Wilson Bradshaw 

Joseph Harrison 
Larkin Hodges 
J.R Carlton 
James Parsons 
W.H. Phillips 
William Wilcox 
James Parsons 
J.R Carlton 
Larkin Hodges 
James Parsons 
Levi Wilson 
Larkin Hodges 
James Parsons 
J.R Carlton 
Monroe Gragg 
Monroe Gragg 
Levi Wilson 
James Parsons 
Larkin Hodges 
Larkin Pipes 
J.F. Eller 
E.M. Gragg 
David Eller 
Wm. M. Lee 
John F. Eller 
E. M. Gragg 
J.C. Miller 
E.M. Gragg 
S.T. Carroll 
John F. Eller 
Geo. W. Trivette 
J.C. Miller 
W.M. Lee 
J.F. Davis 
J. F. Sherwood 
D. C. Harman 



1 nm 

moi 


Mony rorK 




W m IVI T ,AP 

▼ ▼ 111. l.X. 


.Tohn CrisD 


lyv2 


Poplar Grove 


1 C Miliar 


A .T Shul 1 


J C Blavlock 




isoones rorK 


F' IVf C^Tikoo 

F . ItX. vrl 


W m IVT T >pp 


J C Miller 




^^^^ 1j ' v% n van V 

jYii. Hipnraiui 


r . iTi. vti <ig^ 


TT 111* ITX* X-itt 


F M Graffff 

M. • ITX* X.* 1 


1 one 


iviu r^aran 


Mil, ItX. vti <tgg 


AVm IVf T 

TT 111* V 


^Vm IVf l^pp 

TT KAl* i.TX* X^W%/ 


1 QflA 


I enow xiiii 


Thn« 1 Dnv 

X IIU9. X^. mJAJ 


m IVf T >pp 

TT 111* ITA* M^\^\, 


X^LSn MMm \M TT 11 


1 on7 

lyv 1 


i^ew iviver 


X llUd. X^. mJAj 


\Vrn 1Vf T 


.T F Davi^ 

%3 m X • X^AT li9 


1 yUo 


ITXIUUIC V^dllC 


TiinK^c F Church 


Wm IM Lee 


J. C. Miller 


1909 


Flk 


Thos L. Dav 


Wm. M. Lee 


J. C. Miller 


1910 


¥ €1III"a1 Y^At*!^ 


Thn« L Dav 


Wm M Lee 

TT AAA* i.TA.« X^^w 


Wm M Lee 

T T 111* ±TA.* XJ^Vr 


1011 


ItII* ▼ ClIlUII 


Thft« T Dav 

X X^. mJAj 


A\^rn IVf^ T ^pp 

TT 111* ITX* X^^V- 


D M Wheeler 

X.#* ITX* TT ll^^lVl 


1 91 '7 


JTupi^r vriuvc 


Thn« T Dav 

X llUa. X^. R^Aj 


1Vf T^pp 

TT 111* ITA* X^WV 


R F Wilcox 

X^* X • TT IIWA 


1 91 




Thn« L Dav 


^ TTiimntnn 

X ^ akj* 1 X«l 111 1/t.VFll 


S Ffamntnii 

J. ^ skj* XX A 111 Lf 1>\/11 


1 01 d 


Mt. Ephraim 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


\^rn T .pp 

TT 111* ITX* X^CV- 


191 ^ 


Boones Fork 


Thos. L. Day 


Wm. M. Lee 


D M Wheeler 

Xr* ITX* Tt ll^^lVl 


1616 


Rock Spring 


B. F. Wilcox 


Wm. M. Lee 


Wm. M. Lee 


1917 


Mt. Paran 


B. F. Wilcox 


N.S. Hampton 


N S Hamnton 


1918 


Due to outbreak of influenza, no Association was held 




1919 


Yellow Hill 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


B.F. Wilcox 


1920 


Mt. Vernon 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


N. S. Hampton 


1921 


Laurel Fork 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


D. M. Wheeler 


\922 


Watauga 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


O^rar Dillinppr 


1923 


Poplar Grove 


B. F. Wilcox 


N. S. Hampton 


1V S Tfiirnntnn 

1 ^ • k7* XX All! L# t.\/ll 


1924 


Boones Fork 


B. F. Wilcox 


J. A. Hampton 


W D Ashlev 

TT • X.^* Xm^llHWT 


1925 


Mt. Ephraim 


B. F. Wilcox 


J.A. Hampton 


.T A FliiTTintnn 

tJ • .Tm* X^ Alll L/ IVll 


1926 


Rock View 


D. M. Wheeler 


J. A. Hampton 


G M. Watson 

• 1. T A* T T Ai9 VIA 


1927 


Elk 


D. M. Wheeler 


R.F. Wilcox 


A TTsirnliv 


1928 


Watauga 


D. M. Wheeler 


B.F. Wilcox 


R F WilroY 

m3% J. * TT UV'UA 


1929 


Sandy Flat 


D. M. Wheeler 


B.F. Wilcox 


VT*iTX* TT tfti^Ull 


1930 


Middle Cane 


W. D. Ashley 


B.F. Wilcox 


T.innpv Hsifnpc 


1931 


Laurel Fork 


W.D. Ashley 


B.F. Wilcox 


B F Wilcox 

X^*X * TT IMV-VA 


1932 


New Hopewell 


G.M. Watson 


B.F. Wilcox 


J.T. McGuire 


1933 


Yellow Hill 


B.F. Wilcox 


Roy Keller 


G M Watson 

VJ*i.«X* Tt Al-^vAl 


1934 


Mt. Vernon 


G.W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


R.H. Shore 


1935 


Grandmother Gap 


G.W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


W J Cook 

TT •V* ^ufWlm 


1936 


Mt. Ephraim 


G.W. Gragg 


Roy Keller 


f^arl Xrinlptf 

^..'Ol I XI ILflV-^^ 


1937 


Mt. View 


B.F. Wilcox 


G.M. Watson 


Rs)v TTpnHfiY 

XXmY XXCilUI lA 


1938 


Watauga 


Carl Triplett 


F.L. Hampton 


W D Achlev 


1939 


Laurel Fork 


Carl Triplett 


F.L. Hampton 


W T Cr\t\V 


1940 


Bailey^s Camp 


Carl Triplett 


F.L. Hampton 


G M Watcnn 

VJ. ITX. TT ittiSUIl 


1941 


Sandy Flat 


Lee J. Church 


N.L. Harrison 


Roy Keller 


1942 


New Hopewell 


Lee J. Church 


N.L. Harrison 


B.F. Wilcox 


1943 


Boone Fork 


Lee J. Church 


N.L. Harrison 


W. B. Bryant 


1944 


Watauga 


N.L. Harrison 


W.M. Brown 


Frank Knight 


1945 


Laytown 


N.L. Harrison 


W.M. Brown 


W.D. Ashley 



1946 


Mt. Vernon 


G.M. Watson 


W. M. Brown 


W.D. Ashley 


1947 


Yellow Hill 


Theo Hendrix 


G.M. Watson 


Roscoe Greene 


1948 


Doe Ridge - No minutes, manuscript lost at printers 




1949 


Mt. Paran 


Theo Hendrix 


G.M. Watson 


Roscoe Greene 


1950 


Rock Spring 


Theo Hendrix 


N.L. Harrison 


R.L. Barnes 


1951 


New Hopewell 


Theo Hendrix 


N. L. Harrison 


Barney Oliver 


1952 


Boone Fork 


G.M. Watson 


J. Merritt Coflfey 


W.J. Cook 


1953 


East Flats 


Theo Hendrix 


G.M. Watson 


R.L. Barnes 


1954 


Mt. Ephraim 


Theo Hendrix 


G.M. Watson 


Lloyd Duller 


1955 


Bailey's Camp 


Theo Hendrix 


G.M. Watson 


W.J. Cook 


1956 


Laurel Fork 


Theo Hendrix 


J.Merritt Coffey 


W.M. Brown 


1957 


Mt. Vernon 










Sandy Flat 


Theo Hendrix 


J.Merritt Coffey 


W.J. Cook 


1958 


Laytown 










Rock Spring 


Theo Hendrix 


J. M. Coffey 


Carson Eggers 


1959 


New Hopewell 










Long Ridge 


Carson Eggers 


J.Merritt Coffey 


W.J. Cook 


1960 


Mt Paran 










Boones Fork 


Carson Eggers 


J.M. Coffey 


Wendell Critcher 


1961 


Watauga 










Yellow Hill 


Carson Eggers 


J. M. Coffey 


Dupree Gowan 


1962 


Mt. Ephraim 










Sandy Flat 


Carson Eggers 


Winifred Hampton 


Roby McNeil 


1963 


Doe Ridge 










Rock Spring 


Carson Eggers 


Winifred Hampton 


W.M. Brown 


1964 


Bailey's Camp 










Boone Fork 


E.O. Bustle 


Mrs.Clark Story 


W.M. Quinn 


1965 


Laurel Fork 










Laytown 


E.O. Bustle 


Mrs. Clark Story 


W.M. Brown 


1966 


Long Ridge 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Story 


Phillip Martin 




Mt. Paran 


A.C. Moody 


Mrs. Clark Story 


Pete Vannoy 


1967 


Mt. Vernon 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Story 


Basil Tester 




New Hopewell 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Story 


E.O. Bustle 


1968 


Rock Spring 


A.C. Moody 


Mrs. Clark Story 


A.C. Moody 




Sandy Flat 


Archie Clawson 


Mrs. Clark Story 


R Matheson 


1969 


Bailey's Camp 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Clark Story 


Lewis Hodges , 




Boone Fork 


Lewis Hodges 


Mrs. Clark Story 


Herring Crisp 


1970 


Laurel Fork 


Lewis Hodges 


Barbara West 


Davis Austin 




Doe Ridge 


Lewis Hodges 


Barbara West 


Archie Clawson t 


1971 


Laytown 


David Austin 


Barbara West 


Ray Turbyfill 




Long Ridge 


David Austin 


Barbara West 


Sherrill Welbom 


1972 


Mt. Ephraim 


David Austin 


Barbara West 


Gumey Robbins ' 




Mt. Paran 


David Austin 


Barbara West 


A. C. Moody 


1973 


Mt. Vernon 


Marvin Saunders 


Barbara West 


Everette Watson 




New Hopewell 


Marvin Saunders 


Barbara West 


Sherrill Welbom 



1974 


Rock Spring 


Marvin Saunders 


Barbara West 


ivicric jonnson 




Sandy Flat 


Marvin Saunders 


isarDara wesi 


¥^aIa ^^ilc#'AO/1 


1975 


Yellow Hill 


Merle Johnson 


Barbara West 


T^AAn Ua^#vac 

iiean xiouges 




Bailey s Camp 


Merle Johnson 


Barbara West 


iviax wesi 


1976 


Boone Fork 


Charles Craig 


uaroara wesi 


ivioouy 




Doe Kidge 


Charles Craig 


isaroara wesi 


1 l/xvr/i LI All m o n 

i^ioyu noiiman 


1977 


Laurel Fork 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


Kaymond uendrix 




Laytown 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


iviax wesi 


1978 


Long Kidge 


Charles Craig 


Barbara West 


all* w% A wr^w wa 

r^niiiip iviaiTin 




Mt. Lptiraim 


\_naries i^raig 


Daroara wesi 


A ■ IV^ A/\f4vr 

A.*^. ivioouy 


1979 


Mt. Vernon 


Max West 


t^A**l^A»*A *]ft/A<l^ 

isarDara wesi 


U A 1 ^a K2aaw« 

jtiaroid isean 




Boone Fork 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Harold Danner 


1980 


Mt. raron 


Max West 


tsaroara west 


Jim Lambert 




New Hopewell 


lYiax wesi 


Daroara wesi 


Duri jones 


1981 


Rock Spring 


Max West 


Barbara West 


Cannon Ward 




dandy riat 


Max West 


U A a ma mA/ AA^ 

isaruara wesi 


Jim i^amoen 


1982 


Watauga 


Max West 


Barbara West 


jacK wniie 




Bailey's Camp 


iviax wnite 


K^Awal^AMVA Sm/ 

uaroara wesi 


i^ecii v^ragg 




Boone Fork 


jacK wniie 


isaroara wesi 


13 ■ ■ mI I An AC* 

Duri jones 




Doe Ridge 


jacK wnite 


U A A A %a/aO^ 

Daroara wesi 


J. IK. ivoooins 


1 Qfizi 


j^aurei rorK 


jacK wniie 


i^inua iviiiis 


jacK wniie 




Liayiown 


jacK wniie 


juinaH iviiiis 


CjO vrreene 


1 Qfi^ 


i^ung iviugc 




J^llliltft lTlliI> 


oLuii v^iiurcn 




ivit. iLpnraim 


J. IV. KODDinS 


i^inoa IVIIIIS 


U ■ MA Awa A 

Hid ^reene 




Rock Spring 


J. tv. KOuDins 


i^inua iviius 


scon L-nurcn 




sandy riat 


J.tC KODDinS 


Linda Mills 


Max West 


IVo / 


Bailey's Camp 


J. K- KODDinS 


Linda Mills 


Greg Mathis 




Boone Fork 


J.K. KODDinS 


Linda Mills 


tjverette Lime 


1 Qfifi 


LFoe ixiage 


scon *_-nurcn 


i^inoa jviiiis 


ivennem tvidings 




ijayiown 


scon \_.nurcn 


i^inaa iviiiis 


^-^aner ivioreiz 


19XQ 

1 yoy 


T t\t\n \i\tKa€^ 
l_<UIlg IVIUgC 


scuii \^iiurcii 


T in#lo IV^illc 


/\iex Douin 




iTii. iLipiir<tiiii 


SLUii \^iiurcn 


i^inQ<i IVIIIIS 


\^aner ivioreiz 




1*1 no 

ivuciv opriiig 


i _A/^ \<.^vmi 

vxcorgc Dcrry 


■ in#io iV^ilIc 
J-<llill<l ItXIIIs 


SLOii i^nurcn 




Canrlv Flgf 
odiiuy n<ti 


i _ A r\ w*ft o 1<ai*w 

vrcorge r>crry 


T inno iV^illc 

JL<inu<i iTiiiis 


\a/ac#' 

ividA weal 


1991 

vyy v 


oil A V ^ C €^ O YYl Tl 

DallCy 9 v^<tllIU 


l_.A/^i*nA f^ovnj 

vTcorge Dcrry 


ljinu<l irllllS 


tiinimy xiuoDarQ 




Doone i*orK 


George Berry 


Linda Mils 


Eugene Fillers 


VyyL 


i^oc iviagc 


^jcorge uerry 


L<inaa jviiiis 


Arvil Hardy 




j-iayiown 


Greorge Berry 


Linda Mills 


Dennis Geouge 


199"^ 
1 yyo 


l-<UIlg IxJUgC 


iYlHX WCSl 


i^inda iviiiis 


John McCoury 




IV^f* 17'nlit*oim 

iTii. iLipiir<tiiii 


iTist A w esi 


i^inda IVIIIIS 


snerriii liunn 


1994 


Rn<*lf Slntnno 




l^iIiU<t IVllllS 


ivicoara j>aira 




Sandy Flat 


Max West 


Linda Mills 


Leon Silver 


1995 


Bailey's Camp 


Ron Burgett 


Linda Mills 


Max West 




Doe Ridge 


Ron Burgett 


Linda Mills 


Arvil Hardy 


1996 


Laytown 


Ron Burgett 


Linda Mills 


Danny Murphy 



Long Ridge 
1997 Mt. Ephraim 
Rock Spring 



Ron Burgett 
Roy Kanupp 
Roy Kanupp 



Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 
Linda Mills 



John McCoury 
Tim Dockery 
Ron Burgett 



The churches; Buffalo Cove, Cool Springs, Wilkes County Elk, Stony Fork, and Yellow 
Hill, formerly belonging to other associations. 

Met at the Stony Fork Baptist Church and organized the Stony Fork Baptist Association 
on November 9th and 10th., 1880. For this meeting, appointed Elder Larkin Hodges, 
moderator and Brother Elijah Trivette, Clerk. 



TABLES 









































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p 


CHURCHES 


c 

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p, s 

o 


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O 

1 

o 


— 

o 

f 


£ i 

o 
?^ 

i 

3 
0* 

o 


DISCIPLESHIP TRAINI 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


TOTALS 






































3. 
r» 

I 


DISCIPLESH P TRAINING DIRECTORS i ADDRESSES 
(INCLUDE ZIP CODE) 


ING INFORMATION YEAR ENDING-^J/- 1997 




-D 










































TOTAL ONGOING 
DISCIPLESHIP 
TRAINING 






O 


i 








































Ongoing Presch. B-5 


r 




— 


1 
! 








































Ongoing Child. 6-1 1 
















































Ongoing Youth 12-17 


i? 














































Ongoing Adult 18 & Up 


- 

(0 

a 














































DT Gen. Officers 


1 

<D 

a 




o 


i 




































C) 




TOTAL SHORT-TERM 
DISCIPLESHIP 
TRAINING 


o 




O 










































Short-Term Preschool 


ro 
o 

B) 




O 






































o 




Short-Term Children 


ro 
o 
cr 




o 










































Short-Term Youth 


ro 




o 










































Short-Term Adults 


KJ 
O 
Q. 




-« 










































TOTAL DT 
ENROLLMENT/ 
PARTICIPATION 


Add 
19&20 



e- o 



_ c 



o 

IS 



■o 



IT" 

-z 
p 



o 



^1 

has 

c 



r 



P I 



o 

c 

-4 
T 



z 

D 
Z 

o 



oo 



TOTAL MUSIC 

MINISTRY 
ENROLLMENT 



Preschool 3-5 yrs 



Children 6-11 yrs 



0\ 



5^ 



Youth 12-17 yrs 



1^ 



Adult Choirs 18 & Up 



Other Music Groups 



































f 

\^ ■ 
z 


to 

%. 


r- 

r 


t 

p 


CHURCHES 


B 

D 

i 

o 

5 
1 

i 

1 

1 

1 

i 


II 

ri 

9 

^Z- 0) 

i 
> 

>^ 1 
r> 

O 

o 

e. 
E 


1. 

f 


-tA 

r 

£ 

s 

o> 

0) 


MISSIONS INVOLVEMENT/EDUCATION 

(Includes WMU i BfOlhertiood) YEAR ENDING '7- 3/ - 1 997 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


— ( 
O 
H 
> 

to 






1 














1 


1 


1 


1 




? li' 
t f 

^. 

■ L 

I' 

1 


^% 

c K 


^1^ 

t 

R 


it 

If 

1 
1 


E 1^ 

' \: 

?p 

lE- 
f 

F 


1 
1 

l| 

2IS 
SIS 

I 3J 
O M 

° > 

Sis 
512 

"•iz 

>lo 

mm 
in N 

l2 

1 

1 








































O 




MISSION PROJECTS PART. 






































o 








Local Community 


ro 
ro 

0) 




o 








































State/National 


lO 1 
rj 

CT 


































o 






o 


C) 


International 


ro 

ro 1 
o 




LA 


































U 




6^ 


TOTAI \A/MI 1 
1 \J 1 ML WIVtU 

ENROLLMENT 


s 
c 


ro 
u 

i 




1 
1 

I 






































CS 


Mission Fnends B-5 


1 

•o! 

u 

» 1 

L 


































O 


o 


<3 


D 


o 


Ages 6-11 


ro 

cr 1 

1 


































o 








O 


Ages 12-17 


1 

ro 
J? 












































Ages 18 & Up 


ro 
u 
o. 




































<o 


y 


D 




WMU Ldrship Team 


ro 
u 
" 




































Q) 


o 






TOTAL 
BROTHERHOOD 
ENROLLMENT 


00 

o 

H 
Z 
m 

3 

z 
o 
o 
o 


ro 




O 





































o 




Ages 6 -11 


ro 




o 
































V) 


v.; 


o 




Ages 12 - 17 


ro 

a- 




o 









































Ages 18 & Up 


ro 
r> 




o 





































o 





Mission Action Groups 


ro 



































o 





Q 





o 


Other Missions 
Education 




ro 
cn 































r 

^_ 


r 

r 
£ 


I 

5 


r 


:} 

*=> 

o — 

r 


r 

I* 

c 


CHURCHES 




Pi 

'J- 1 

pi 

ro 
-> 


? 


w 

is 

£ 
s> 

D 


FINANCIAL INFORMATION YEAR ENDING ■ 3 / - 1997 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


-1 
O 
-i 
> 
I— 

w 




























5" 

a — 

o 

r 

rN 
So 


c ^ 
^ P 

^ * . 
-f 

r-r- 
z 

o 

r 

*o 


» -• 
t> 

1 


I "n 
<* 

Si 
rv 



r 

\ 


=^ 

D 
t 

r 

'"^ 
St. 

•5 


Til 

si ^. 
nl »^ 

2 (p 
IT -C- 

cd 

t 

■c 


m 

^ 
X 
m 

J3 

V) 

> ' 

D 
O 
H 

m 

CO 
CO 

m 

CO 

2 

O 

c 
o 

fn 
M 

■D 

O 
O 
D 


I 

o 

i 




€— 




























-C 

-c 


r- 


Oa 


5^ 
Js 

< 








Undesignated Gifts 


ro 
o> 




oC 

O- 
































^ 
«N 




Vi 

--a 
v> 






Designated Gifts 


ro 




-CI 




































c — 






Other Receipts 


ro 

OD 




O 




























So 

< 


lA 


-J 


<A 


o 






Total Receipts 


> 

Q. 
Q. 

ro 

O) 

ro 

CD 




£- 

c 




































NO 






Cooperative Program 


ro 
to 


































So 
NO 






Nj 


6^ 
C 




Assoc fi/lissions 






— 1 






































■ — 




State Missions 


u 




-C 
O 
^ 




























OO 
UN 








o 






Annie Armstrong 




































\ 


>^ 




o 


€^ 




Lottie Moon 


u 
u 


































Vj 


«^ 

6X 




o 
o 






Other SBC Mission 
Expenditures 


i: 
































s> 

NO 


i 












Non-SBC Mission 
Expenditures 


Hi 




-c 
c- 

O 






























Vi 

<i 

!i 
o 




o 


^N 

^^ 

c> 
o 

a 


o 




Value-Cong. Property 






o 










































Congregational Debt 


u 
-J 































I 


r 




f 


. 

s> 


*> 

Q 


CHURCHES 


^'1 

r 

6- 

I. 
I 

s? 

1 


?! 

(0 f 


en 

^ 

"» 

z. 


o 

r 

s 

S 

P> 

O 


MEMBER/CONGREGATIONAL INFORMATION YEAR ENDING '?- a/-1997 


PREVIOUS YEAR TOTALS 


H 

o 

H 
> 
r- 
CO 

1 




























z\ 

D 

r 

:i 

2 ^- 
0— - 

r 

o 


Z. 
£ 

LP 

H 

^ fT 

^ r. 

€- 

-c 


—J 

?5 

•a 


W 
z 
t 

Oi^ 
=" 

r -t- 
r> 

% 

s« r 

oJ 
o 


P 
■s 

S 

3. 

TO 


r 

Lu 
lA 
tov 
(» 

r ^ 

\ 

1 


> 

O 
(/i 

> 

o 

o 

n 

m 

lit . 

w 

m 

(n 

z 

o 

c 
o 
m 

•D 

8 

o 
m 




























E 
p 

c 

r 


6. 

(0 




? 

p— 
C - 


P 
& 
P 


P_ 




County 


i 
i 
1 




U\ 
So 




























oQ 








6- 
<^ 


6- 

so 




TOTAL MEMBERSHIP 


































«^ 

CO 














ResidlM Members 


ro 




j 




























o 




so 




"\ 






1 

TOTAL BAPTISMS 


u 
































o 






o 


O 


C5 




Bstptiims Under 6 


CO 

u 
































D 




Q 






O 










— 




























O 


o 






o 


o 




1 Baptisms Age 9-1 1 


































O 


o 


Cs 






o 




Baptisms Age 12-17 











































o 


O 




Baptisms Age 1 B-29 






€^ 

































o. 





o) 


G» 




Baptisms Age 30-59 


































O 


c> 


O 


Cs 





Ci 




Baptisms 60 & Up 


<§? 




































JO 











Other Additions 


































o 


So 














New Member Training 


U1 
































Id 




~3 




■< 


~0 
•0 




Year Organized 


o> 
































■« 


->© 


Cm 


^> 








Year Pastor Came 


->J 
































>v 


V. 




ra 




4> 




Location (A-J) 


o> 














































Raaal/Etti. Grp. (1-7) 






So 


































v> 

y\ 




>^ 




AM Worship Service 
Attendance 


ID 
































pi 






Cs 




O 




Church-Type 
Missions Started 


O 




O 




























o 


o 




c> 








Ch.-Type Mis. Oper. 


J 


































-< 


-< 


-< 








Lost/Unchurched (Y/N) 


































-< 


•< 








^. 




Assoc. Missions on % 
Basis (Y/N) 
















































Inlerces. Prayer (Y/N) 





5: 



■ « 
5 



O- TO- 

,0- C < 



o 



so 



5:^ 



i 7 C 



(A 



73 



P 



r 



-t1 



so 
-0 



0\ 



TOTAL SS 
ENROLLMENT 



Preschcxjl Birth-5 



a 



3o 



Children 6-11 



Youth 12-17 



Adults 18-24 



3o 



Adults 25-34 



Adults 35-54 



O 



Adults 55-Up 



Gen. Otiicers 



Other Bible Study 



o 



BS Avg Weekly Attend 



ISS Not Cong Members 



A. 



5j 



Vacation Bible School 



248 CI ^ 

11/09/09 48B70